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5

Here's something I believe is a simple proof. Unfortunately it uses a little bit of cohomology. Consider the canonical 2-form in extended phase space $T^*M \times \mathbb{R}$ $$\omega = \sum_{i=1}^N dq_i \wedge dp_i - dH(\vec{q},\vec{p},t) \wedge dt ,$$ where $N = dim(M)$. A function $f: M \to M$ is said to be a canonical transformation iff $f^* \omega = ...


3

To add to Whelp's Answer. Even though the $$\bar{d}Q=T\,dS$$ does not hold in an irreversible process, it still gives us something general. Consider a thermodynamic system linked to a system of reservoirs and which can only exchange heat and nothing else with the reservoirs. Let's call the thermodynamic system an engine for our convenience. Then the engine ...


3

This relation is not true for general processes. For a closed system, the general relation is $\delta Q \leq TdS$, as is illustrated by the Clausius Theorem (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clausius_theorem). Another way of writing it is $dS=\delta Q/T + dS_{irr}$ where $ dS_{irr}$ is the entropy change due to irreversibilitiy in the closed system ...


2

By the main theorem of connectedness in general topology, continuous maps preserve connectedness. Time evolution of Hamiltonian systems preserves connectedness because it is continuous. I think it is independent of from Liouville's theorem, it just requires the proving Hamiltonian time evolution is continuous. This is just a formal way of restating ...


2

Bose particles cannot be identified as different in a given state, whereas boltzmann particles can (even though both types can occupy a given energy state with more than one particle). Thus boltzmann statistics need to take into account the permutations ($n!$) of the $n$ particles into a given state, in contrast to the bose particles (which are not ...


1

REMARK. Perhaps I wrongly interpreted the question. I interpreted it as if were referred to the total volume of phase space. The answer is negative if the question regards general changes in time of topology of the total space of phases and if you do not impose any generic restriction on the topology of the spaces, like compactness (see the final ...


1

Since you have the expression of $\Omega$ your work is almost done. First remember that the entropy for a micro-canonical (fixed energy) system at thermal equilibrium is given the very famous Boltzmann's formula : $$S=k_B\,ln(\Omega)$$ Then, simply use the Stirling's approximation to evaluate $ln(N!)\approx Nln(N)-N$ (because $N>>1$, i.e. very long ...


1

Interesting question. I would have thought that if you were aware of the exact number of energy states and the populations thereof, you could apply boltzmann statistics to each of the levels in order to fit an appropriate temperature to the population in each state. This temperature, if comparable amongst the included levels, would therefore require that the ...



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