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Nothing in the laws of thermodynamics forbids multiple liquid phases for a single substance. The only limit is the simultaneous coexistence of at most three phases (at triple points). Water has a solid-liquid-gas triple point and several soid-solid-liquid and solid-solid-solid triple points; see the phase diagram of water and ice. In addition, although not ...


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There is actually only one disordered phase - from a physicist's perspective, the liquid and the gas are actually the same phase because one can continuously vary the external parameters (temperature and pressure, in this case) to get from the liquid to the gas without passing through any phase transition, because the phase transition line terminates within ...


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The most immediate answer would seem to be that a great variety of different crystal phases can exist because their long-range order makes it possible to classify them based on the different symmetries of their lattice structure. Since the liquid (or amorphous solid) phase only has short-range order and the gaseous phase doesn't even have that, it seems ...


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Yes. An equivalent way of saying this is that if an ice cube (or iceberg...) melts, the water level remains unchanged. (I.e.: the melted iceberg exactly fits in the 'hole' it creates underwater.) To see this, think of what is holding the ice up: it's buoyancy, which is the upward force due to the pressure of the surrounding water. This force is directly ...


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Imagine a portion of the(liquid) water. It will be in equilibrium with the whole fluid. The buoyancy force $E_1$ over this portion matches its weight. Now freezes this same portion. The buoyancy force $E_2$ on the ice equals its weight. Since the weights are the same, the buoyancy forces are equal. This implies the volume of fluid dislocated in both ...


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Shouldn't water pressure change, when water goes from liquid to vapor (boiler) and vice versa (condenser)? No, it shouldn't. Because water is on a constant pressure line during the processes (from point $1$ to $2$ in the boiler and from point $3$ to $4$ in the condenser) for both cases. In addition, phase of a matter doesn't depend on the pressure only. ...



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