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The amount of energy per cubic metre in a degenerate gas depends on the density and composition of that material. I can only give some examples - any specific mixtures or densities would require individual calculation. The energy density of an ideal, completely degenerate gas of fermions is given by $$u = \frac{\pi m^4 c^5}{h^3} \left[ ...


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If Rob Jeffries numbers are right (Here) and it seems as good a baseline as any, you get about 3*10^15th Joules per KG of Neutron Star matter. The Hiroshima bomb was about 6*10^13th Joules, so just 1 KG of degenerate matter, you'd be looking at about 50 Hiroshima bombs released in kinetic energy, in the form of (I think) mostly Neutrons. 1 KG of hydrogen ...


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I've seen this question some years ago. Note that the water level doesn't change as the ice melts ONLY if the ice is melting in pure water. If you melt ice cubes in salt water, the water level will increase as the ice melts.


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The displacement answers of mew and kal are spot on. This is about the chemistry of the displacement. Water is the only substance with solid density less than the liquid. As you cool a liquid and it settles in and get more dense. As it settles to solid it typically just settles in more. Water is very a interesting molecule in that it is very stable ...


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Quasi-neutrality is only observed with bulk plasma. Although it appears neutral to outside observance at large scales, we also know at smaller scales the movement of the charge carriers creates EM fields and electric currents which further affect its behavior. In reality in space no such condition exists, as the plasma is not confined in little glass jars ...


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Your argument is based upon the idea that all the matter in the universe was created at the moment of the Big Bang. If matter can be created from nothing at the moment of the Big Bang then it does seem reasonable that matter could disappear again, as you say. The trouble is that there is no experimental or theoretical support for the idea that matter was ...


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One cannot obtain "clean" energy which is completely free off momentum, and cannot obtain "clean" matter which is free off momentum and potential energy. So question is ill-posed, there is no "clean" states which can be described as "energy into matter". That just cannot happen. When we consider reactions of elementary particles, the most common scenario ...


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In what ways can energy transform into matter and vice versa? I am sure in special relativistic theory there is no such transformation. Why? Energy is an abstract mathematical quantity obeying local conservation law. Matter is a basic thing the world is made of. It is not a mathematical concept. One can quantify one aspect of it, say introduce ...


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I've just remembered that there was once a suggestion to use a mixture of xenon and oxygen under high pressure to allow people to float/fly/swim in it. It was also stated that water could be lighter than such a mixture. According to Smithsonian Physical Tables the critical point for xenon is $16.6\,\text{C}^{\circ},\quad ...



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