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8

Background Stars are composed of plasmas, which are an ionized gas that exhibit a collective behavior much like a fluid. There are two important aspects of plasmas to keep in mind. The first is that they act like very highly conductive metals in that the electrons can move very freely in order to cancel out any charge imbalance. The consequence is that ...


9

Overall, a star stays more or less neutral. This is true for all stellar objects beside black holes. I am using a simple calculation that can be found in a footnote of https://arxiv.org/abs/1001.3294 on p. 11 chap. 2. Suppose the star has an overall charge of Z times the elementary charge, $Ze$, and we consider the Coulomb repulsion of a test particle, say ...


2

Not at all clear what you mean by "the energy of a star". A ten solar mass star that explodes as a core collapse (type II) supernova releases about $10^{46}$ J, mostly in the form of neutrinos. By comparison, the total rest mass energy of the star is around $2\times 10^{48}$ J. Another comparison would be how much energy a star releases during its ...


0

What you are missing is that the size and the distance between two objects perceived by human eye turns out to be false due phenomena of diffraction at very large distances.You see, the limit of resolution of human eye is small. To know what I mean, consider 2 points of paper very close to each other. Move your head away from paper until what you see is ...


1

If I'm understanding the question properly, the actual distance (represented in the diagram by $D$), is very different to the distance that we roughly 'see' with our eyes (represented by $E$). In general, the 'actual' distance will be much greater than the 'apparent' naive distance. There are, of course, much larger problems with trying to use your method ...


3

According to the cosmic censorship hypothesis all singularities are assumed to be behind horizons. This is not the same as saying "all horizons contain a singularity". The black hole solutions to Einstein's equations (which contain singularities) are all stationary, vacuum spacetimes. Stationary means that the spacetime does not explicitly depend on time. ...



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