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I don't know the specific context that you may be looking for, but it's quite common to use a four-point correlation function of the quantum dipole moment operator to retrieve non-linear relaxation dynamics. These correlation functions make up the nonlinear response function of a material system to an electric field which, when convolved with the excitation ...


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The apparent color of an object does change when different frequencies of light are incident. In the extreme case that light of a single frequency is incident, only that frequency is reflected, and the color of the object ... and every object ... is the color of the incident light. The apparent color of an object changes under different types of "white ...


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The phenomenon is a little different that you describe. A red object, for instance, absorbs most of the frequecies and only reflects back the ones on the red spectrum. Actually the reason that a red object looks black on blue light (which has higher frequency) is that the blue light will be absorved by the object (not reemited), and there is no red light to ...


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One powerful method is LIF, laser induced fluorescence. You start with molecules or atoms in the ground state normally and use a laser with variable wavelength to excite them. Whenever you hit a transition to an excited state that fluoresces laser light is absorbed and then the excited states emit light in all directions. A simple photomultiplier detector ...


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A problem formulated in the time domain and its equivalent formulation in the frequency domain contain essentially the same information. They just have different mathematical forms. One is easier to solve than the other, that is why we use transformations. Many problems attempted through the equations of motion obtained from Newton's equations are really ...


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There are no differences. Frequency domain is used as a mathematics transformation tool (Fourier, Laplace) in order to resolve too complex differential equations in time domain spectra.


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A single oscillator will make the rope tied between the two walls, to display standing waves, i.e. any point of the rope will rise and get down according to a law f(t) = Asin(ωt), where A is the maximal amplitude of oscillation at that point. But you have two oscillators. The oscillation of a point in time is (1) f(t) = A_1 sin(ω_1 t) + A_2 sin(ω_2 t). ...


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I believe it's the integral of intensity over time. $$\text{Lifetime intensity}=\int_0^\infty{I(t)dt}$$ "Intensity" in the instantaneous light output - the total light you get is that intensity from excitation until final decay. That said - it seems that the figure 2 in the paper you referenced in your link is using inconsistent labeling - because in the ...



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