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The Compton effect is the inelastic scattering of photons by electrons. Compton's initial experiment used electrons in a graphite crystal to act as scatterers. These electrons are not free, they are bound, but the X-ray energies (17 keV) were large compared with the binding energies, so they approximated to free electrons. Photons of lower energies (UV to ...


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Absolutely not. Both you and the people on Earth would see each other moving $7$ times slower. To repeat myself: you would see them going $7$ times slower and they would see you going $7$ times slower. This is because of the main principle of special relativity. As long as neither of you is accelerating there is nothing to choose between your frame of ...


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So Special Relativity states that for all non-accelerating objects of matter the laws of physics are the same. I think the point is just that the constants and the time and space derivatives that appear in a law of physics should not have to change the form of the equation if you measure the time and the space in two frames that move relative to each ...


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If you are abit more careful about making the statements, then "both perspectives" are actually correct. Let me be more concrete and explain. Let $E$ be the one who stays on Earth and $S$ be the one who is on the spaceship. The first issue you have is you said "let's say seven years passes on Earth" - this is an ambiguous statement: from whose perspective? ...


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First let us cut away some of the meat and the bones of your question. Let us forget about thermodynamics for a minute and classical physics; however we will need GRAVITY (not Newton’s version). Instead of calling it Gravity let us call it General Relativity or (GR). We can still use the term Gravity, but when discussing Quantum Mechanics it’s better to ...


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The axis of simultaneity, or in other words, the set of events which are simultaneous as measured in the rest frame of the ship, does indeed change suddenly when we turn back. This is because it depends on your reference frame. There isn't a single inertial frame that stays with the ship for the whole journey; you can either accept that the frame is ...


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Perhaps it's more illuminating to look at the whole thing in a spacetime diagram. we have the earth frame with coordinates $(t,x)$, and its trajectory through spacetime is the blue line. The trajectory of the spaceship is the red one. Straight worldlines are inertial frames of reference, curved or non-straight worldlines are non-inertial frames of ...


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Entanglement experiment performed in one frame of reference guarantees that the two measured results are synchronized in this frame of reference. If we try to perform the same entangled experiment while the two ends of the same length fiber optic lines are attached to two frames of references moving with a constant relative velocity, the two measured results ...


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You have a good intuition on the possible answer because it does involve oscillations, but you need to visualize the string differently. The origin of the conundrum is not quantum, but relativistic. Here's why: Consider an inertial frame O and set up a string spanning the entire $x$ axis, stretching from $x \rightarrow -\infty$ to $x \rightarrow \infty$. ...


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No. A heavier object will gain more kinetic energy when falling than a lighter object but it has a higher potential energy to start with. It is actually not kinetic energy that is needed to fall but potential energy that is converted in kinetic energy while falling. Generally, while the gravitational force on an object depends on it's gravitational mass, so ...



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