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21

Time dilation is a comparison of rates. When an object is moving fast with respect to you, it's clock rate is slow, and when it comes to rest with respect to you its clock rate returns to normal. The time difference between the two clocks at this time is due to the accumulation due to these different time rates. That is the leftover effect of the time ...


10

It's my understanding that when something is going near the speed of light in reference to an observer, time dilation occurs and time goes slower for that fast-moving object. According to the 'something', it is the observer's clock that runs slower and it is the observer's rulers that are contracted. That is to say, the time dilation and length ...


7

Length contraction effects may be permanent in the same way as time dilation! You just have to choose the right example. Example: An astronaut is traveling at v=0,99 c to an exoplanet, according to Earth frame he is traveling 198 light years in 200 years. According to his frame (reciprocal gamma = 0,141) he is traveling 27,9 light years in 28,2 years. ...


7

The way I see it, time dilation is the real effect here. Length contraction (in SR) is just a consequence of the fact that the "length" of a rod is the distance between simultaneous positions of the rod's endpoints. But two observers with different velocities will have different ideas about what simultaneous is, and this means they measure different ...


4

Careful with comments like "when he receives it"--simultaneity is relative, different frames will disagree about which reading on your clock happens "at the same time" that he receives the pulse. If he is 10 light years away in the frame where you were initially at rest, and you wait 10 years after sending the signal to fire your rockets, then you fire your ...


4

There is actually an equivalent to "total elapsed proper time" along time-like curves in spacetime (which can represent the worldlines of particles moving slower than light), and that is the "proper distance" along a space-like curve (which cannot be any real particle's worldline). See the spacetime wikipedia article for more on time-like vs. space-like, ...


3

Your starting point is incorrect. You say: The point is, Rindler's observer shows us that the "action" of an accelerated observer on space-time is non trivial (there exists a black hole behind a uniformly accelerated observer). You're correct that there is a singularity, but it is only a coordinate singularity. The Riemann tensor is everywhere zero in ...


3

Let's do some math, shall we? Let's call $t$ the time as measured from Earth, and let's say your engine is running with acceleration $a$ for $0 \le t \le T$. The proper time, that is, the time as measured by a clock on a ship, is given by $\tau = \int_0^T \sqrt{1-v^2/c^2}\ dt$, where $v$ is the velocity as measured from Earth. Newton's second law for ...


3

There is an asymmetry between space and time, and that is the reason why time dilation can be permanent and length contraction can not. The reason is that you can travel back and forth in space but not in time. In turn, this is related with an asymmetry between time and space in relativity, not in the laws of motion, but in the theory itself: we cannot go ...


2

No, your facts weren't gathered incorrectly, your reasoning is just incorrect. It doesn't even take knowledge of physics to answer the question, just logical reasoning. (Don't take my language as a personal insult, I'm just trying to be clear.) "It's not like time goes slow for a while, and then speeds back to "normal," so that the age of the observer once ...


2

This is the answer for the "continuum" bit of your question or what happens if Bob leaves for Vogon on a sublight spaceship. I've assumed that Alice and Charlie are one light year away from each in the rest frame of either and that they are at rest with respect to each other (ie the separation will remain one light year for the entire experiment). In ...


2

In relativity there's no objective frame-independent way to compare the rate two clocks at different locations are ticking--different coordinate systems can give different answers (ultimately this is due to the relativity of simultaneity). There is also no frame-independent notion of speed, so you can't say in any objective sense that clocks moving at high ...


2

The only naturally occurring symmetry breaking radiation of this kind is the CMB. Unless you are talking about charged particles of more than approx. 1e19eV energy (in the CMB rest system), the effects are negligible, as far as I know. For those ultrahigh energy particles, however, this so called Greisen–Zatsepin–Kuzmin limit (GZK limit) forms a cosmic fog ...


1

The explanations involving clocks ... Textbook examples or explanations of relativity that involve clocks are often about time-dilation. ... Is valid only if the clocks is ticking ... These examples/explanations generally assume that any clock they mention is a working clock. It doesn't have to be a clock that ticks. It could be any type of clock ...


1

Putting CuriousOne's comment into an answer, In the theory of relativity, time dilation is an actual difference of elapsed time between two events as measured by observers either moving relative to each other or differently situated from gravitational masses. Wikipedia I see that such a definition might be misleading as it talks about time ...


1

Assuming a direct hit - so traveling through about 50 km of atmosphere - at 0.1 c that would take about 2 ms if it didn't get slowed down too much by the atmosphere. What about drag force? Let's assume a radius $r$, density $\rho$, mass $m = \frac43 \pi r^3 \rho$. If it is a sphere, it experiences a drag force $F=\frac12 \rho_a v^2 C_d A$. Putting $\rho_a=1 ...


1

Consider the following results: From the definition of scalar product of four vectors, $$ \tag{1}(p_1 p_2)^2 \equiv (p_{1\mu}p_2^\mu )^2 = (E_1E_2 - \textbf{p}_1 \cdot \textbf{p}_2 )^2.$$ The usual dispersion relations: $$ \tag{2} E_i = \sqrt{ | \textbf{p}_i |^2 + m_i^2}.$$ The velocity $\textbf{v}_i$ in terms of momentum and energy: $$ \tag{3} ...


1

A neutrino has rest-mass and travels at (near) $c$, why isn't its mass/ energy (nearly) infinite? Because it has too low rest mass or still too low speed. Neutrinos are very light particles: Their rest energy is comparable to energy of a hydrogen bond (weaker than typical chemical bound). So you can understand, that full energy must not be infinite. ...


1

As with most apparent paradoxes in relativity, the problem is that you are neglecting to account for the relativity of simultaneity--if the rockets left at the "same time" in the frame of the station, they did not leave at the same time in the frame where rocket E was at rest during its journey across the station. Say that we place the spatial origin (x=0 ...


1

Time dilation does disappear as relative velocity approaches zero. The things experienced during the time experienced do not disappear; cells which have died remain dead and second hands which have ticked ahead do not reverse direction. To undo those things would require time reversal. Sine we as humans only perceive time in one direction, time reversal is ...


1

Alice: 2 years Bob: No time has passed Charlie: 2 years There are a couple of things to point out: First two planets aren't likely to be stationary with respect to each other, they will be rotating at different rates around different suns that are themselves in a solar system with it's own movement. But for a realistic scenario (e.g. another planet in ...



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