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0

Yes, it would work. The trouble is becoming stationary. The earth is moving, and the trees, sky, and even you are moving with it.


1

Assuming you can stay stationary, you will move 180 degrees in longitude. Unless you started at the equator, you won't be at the opposite side of the world. For example, if you start at San Francisco, CA (37.788 N, 122.466 W) You would be at 37.788N, 57.534E, in Northern Iran near Turkmenistan. Why can't you stay stationary? You need somehow to ...


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You can not become stationary. what ever you do, you are moving with the earth as it rotates. (I think no more explanation is needed.)


1

When thinking about such relativistic problems, one should always clearly define who the observer is and who he observes. If you think Earth to be a reference frame of the observer, Earth is not moving w.r.t itself, therefor we don't see time dilation on our self. But for an observer on Sun, Earth is moving and there is a time dilation, as observed from ...


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Your entity is pretty close to the conception of the modern conception of the quantum field in its ground (lowest energy) state. Space and time are not voids of "nothing", but are made of the quantum fields. What conscious beings mean when they say "things happen" in the World is that they are observing interactions between the handful of quantum fields that ...


0

First the obligatory comment that the Big Bang didn't happen at a point. Put behind you all those representations of the Big Bang as an explosion, which are so beloved of TV documentaries. Now on to your question: far more than 90% of the volume of (the known) universe is vacuous. The average density of matter is around 1 hydrogen atom per cubic metre while ...


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To first order, no. The definition of an orbit is that it's a free-fall trajectory — since everything around you is always experiencing the same acceleration as you are, you cannot actually perceive this acceleration without some external reference (like measuring your velocity compared to the Earth, and how fast it changes). That said, the closer ...


-1

When you are in a synchronous circular orbit, the gravitational force equals the radial force, at all times. If the orbit is elliptical, the variations in the orbit will translate into force variations. Whether these variations would be perceived by humans, depends on how "elliptical" the orbit is, and how close to other celestial bodies the orbit takes ...



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