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These videos practically demonstrates what happens when launching an object from a moving object. Projectile Launch from moving object Horizontal velocity remains constant Projectile Motion ( Skit video to 3:25 ) Anyway, thanks to all for your valuable and logical answers on this question.


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This sounds a bit in the spirit of John Wheeler's geometrodynamics. He hoped to find in the dynamic geometry of GR a way for "mass without mass, charge without charge, field without field" to somehow emerge just from vacuum gravitational fields interacting. He contemplated "geons" which would be packets of gravitational waves held together on the short ...


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As a first approximation work out how much mass is being intercepted by your ship per second. Multiply that by 0.5xV^2 and you will get the power in Watts (if V=metres/s) being dumped into your ship assuming all the kinetic energy is dissipated as heat.


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There is another effect to take into account as you accelerate your ship. It is the Unruh Effect


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Firstly, the immediate answer is no, the intensity of radiation is higher when you fly into it, like the rain situation (but the maths is different). There are three interrelated effects that you need to know about regarding your question, which are frequently omitted in popular or introductory SR: aberration of light, the full angle-dependent doppler ...


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Not only does your speed affect the amount of radiation that you receive, but this actually happens to the Earth and has been measured experimentally. You say: So basically in space, there is bound to be stray radiation, whether from the stars, or cosmic background, floating around right. and the most obvious example of this is the cosmic microwave ...


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Actually, you do land a little west of where you jumped. However, that distance is so miniscule for a human jumping that you don't notice it. The reason something projected straight up doesn't fall back onto the same spot is that its radius from the center of rotation increases as it gets higher. Initially, the projectile and the surface of the earth are ...


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When planes fly in the west direction they are basically doing what you suggest: the position of the Sun stays almost fixed and the Earth rotates below them. Still to do that they burn a lot of fuel: first they need to come at a stop with respect to the Sun, which means getting some speed with respect to the Earth, then they have to keep this speed winning ...


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As in the comments, because you are initially stationary relative to the Earth's surface, your initial velocity is exactly the same as that of the ground. The reason why is friction and air resistance: if you weren't so (perhaps you'd just dropped in from space, maybe from Betelgeuse Seven to warn Arthur Dent of a disaster in the offing, and you hadn't ...


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IT's not particularly noticeable when you jump, because you didn't get very high. But if you, say, shoot a model rocket a few hundred meters up, barring interactions w/ the air, it'll land to the west of its launch point. For an analogy, suppose you're in a car going at constant angular speed in a circle of some radius. If you then run right behind the ...


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If you jump insite a train (which is not accelerating nor decelerating at this moment) where do you land? At the same position. Why? Because to be decelerated or to be accelerated every body needs a force which acts on him. Without force no change of the bodies velocity. Why you will be dcelerated when you jump out from a (slow :-)) moving train? Becaus the ...



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