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As stated, helium is inert, so it will not form compounds with other elements. In addition, once it is freely released into the atmosphere, it will quickly rise to very high altitudes, and I assume that it would be stripped away by the solar wind. Despite this, I don't anticipate running out of helium in the near future. Helium is a small constituent of ...


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I'm no expert in this specific area, but there goes my answer: Helium has neutral net charge and a spherically symmetrical electron distribution. It is in the "noble gases" family in the periodic table, therefore it interact very weakly with other atoms, and it does not bond easily. Due to its charge neutrality, I would guess that Helium suffers almost no ...


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You can read the abstract of the Tajmar paper here: http://arc.aiaa.org/doi/abs/10.2514/6.2015-4083. Important quote: We identified the magnetic interaction of the power feeding lines going to and from the liquid metal contacts as the most important possible side-effect that is not fully characterized yet. Our test campaign can not confirm or refute the ...


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There is another speed limit, though The problem with ultra-high speeds could be the doppler beamed and boosted cosmic microwave background (CMB), which may well fry your circuitry. I don't know enough about radiation shielding to give you an exact number where problems would begin. This limit would still apply even should the spacecraft be moving through ...


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Yes. But, using an inverse truss, a form of cable truss and a tensegrity, described in Patent # US8474760B2, eliminates central trusses, significantly reducing weight. Mockups and the patent can be see at http://ffc.futurehistory.us/


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It is not possible to completely void space. In fact, if you and your friend each have a Geiger counter (a particle detector) and yours doesn't go off (so you see a vacuum) and your friend accelerates with their Geiger counter then their device will go off, i.e. they won't see a vacuum. And if you adjust your space so that your friend's device doesn't go ...


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The vacuum is, by definition, the state with no particles (or any other kind of excitation of a field). This is good, because a vacuum that actually had particles and antiparticles jumping in and out of existence would not be Lorentz covariant (that is, it would not respect relativity). Instead, what people mean by this "sea" of virtual particles is that if ...


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The relativistic determining factor would be acceleration, not speed. According to the axioms of relativity, an object moving at constant speed cannot be distinguished from an object at rest in another inertial frame; at high constant speed the satellite will still think it's at rest. The practical limit on speed would be determined by the density of the ...


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Gravity assist might be used in some cases, but generally it is incompatible with the mission required. The space shuttle was only used in low earth orbit. There is nothing in that region that can be used for gravitational assist. Missions to the moon could launch toward the moon on free-return trajectory. But they had to leave that trajectory to line ...



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