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Other answers have handled the oxygen issue quite well. In regards to the temperature, space itself has no temperature because it's a vacuum. Objects in space, however, do have a temperature. If a human is exposed, unprotected, to space near the sun (or any other star), the temperature change in their body could very well be terminal. Even near our ...


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It is a bit of a hypothethical scenario where the body can breathe oxygen and does not rupture from the pressure difference (dissolved gases in the intestine and blood bubbling), but at the same time can evaporate and radiate freely. If we assume so, and also assume that there is no sunlight, then there are two major mechanisms for heat loss: radiative ...


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No. If you go to a random spot in the visible universe, you will usually be far from any galaxies because the separation between galaxies is large compared to the size of the galaxies themselves. Since distant galaxies are so dim that we can't even see them, you certainly cannot see your reflection by them.



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