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It's close enough to the earth to be well within the range of solar eclipses. There's always going to be a solar eclipse somewhere in space because the moon will always cast a shadow behind it, well, except for when the moon is eclipsed by the earth. But the moon's shadow passes over the earth just a small percentage of the time. Given that the space ...


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A great amount of planetary data is available at this NASA website. There doesn't appear to be a strong correlation, but you could use this NASA data to do the statistics.


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In respect to above answer, although you are correct but there is a little discrepancy in your last line " a bigger leap was to try the Sun's location at a focus and not the center." A circle is a ellipsoid with a special case having the two foci at same point, so there could not be so chance putting in centre because it was observed that planets near ...


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In principle in Newtonian mechanics the rest frame can be any of the bodies in a gravitational complex. The geocentric system is one possible rest frame and a one to one mathematical transformation exists going from a heliocentric to a geocentric system. It is when one introduces the concept gravitation, a theory that explains the orbits, that the ...


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I found in an italian book (Barone) that using special relativity precession is 1/6 of the 43''/century observed. The book has merit to treat an argument usually ignored (orbit precession in special relativity) but I find the treatment very concise so I tried to be more explicit and I connect result to a specific initial condition. I find delightful this ...


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The Moon's orbit would be nearly Keplerian were it not for the perturbing effects of the Sun. The time from perigee to perigee and from apogee to apogee wouldn't change, and the time from perigee to apogee would be exactly half the orbital period. What you are seeing are perturbing effects of the Sun on the Moon's orbit. If you use push the site you found, ...


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Interesting question. The earth/moon system around the sun certainly changes speed as the earth gets closer to are farther from the sun, but the Earth/Moon orbit the sun together so the direct effect on the Moons orbit regarding the earth's Apogee and Perigee would probobly be small. I think a larger effect is the tidal effects on the moon's orbit around ...


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Both the the Earth and the Sun orbit around the solar system barycentre. This is defined as the centre of mass of all the bodies in the solar system. Because the Sun contains the vast majority of the mass of the solar system then the barycentre is very close to the Sun. The picture below, from the wikipedia entry on the solar system barycentre, has the ...


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There are at least 8 more planets in the solar system, besides the Earth (and some more were discovered). When Copernicus decided to place the Sun in the center of the solar system, instead of the Earth, that was mainly because this arrangement simplified drastically the form of the orbits of the other planets. With the Geocentric model of the solar system ...


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In binary systems, each object is so affected by the others gravity that they have significant orbit. The sun has so much inertia that the earth's pull barely moves it, but the earth certainly revolves around the sun. In the reference frame of the Earth however, the Sun does revolve around the Earth.


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After a bit of research, the key term here is "the secular dynamics of Mercury". With that, you can easily find course notes that cover the whole calculation: https://farside.ph.utexas.edu/teaching/celestial/Celestial/node118.html It's frowned upon to give a link-only answer, but this is a big reference so I think it's appropriate.


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As the moon is continually receding from the earth due to the tides, the end result will be a stable orbit. about 2.3 billion years from now, the increase of the Sun's radiation will have caused the Earth's oceans to vaporize,[13] removing the bulk of the tidal friction and acceleration. The orbit should be stable. But the sun will finally become a ...


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The Sun will collide with the Earth. The orbits are stable. But in about 5 billion years, the Sun will run low on hydrogen and begin burning helium. This will make it expand and engulf the Earth.



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