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This might be unusual, but I will now give an answer to my own question. Maybe somebody who reads this has the same problem and finds this interesting. After all, I have been able to successfully solve also problem (2), and both algorithms actually work quite well. The approach was to calculate both beam and diffuse parts on the horizontal for all ...


2

I think you are doing your math incorrectly if you get $10^{21}kg$. $$M = \frac{Rv^2}{G}$$ Let's try Jupiter from your reference. $$M = \frac{(778 \times 10^6km) (13.1\frac{km}{s})^2}{G}$$ $$M = \frac{(7.78 \times 10^{11}m) (1.31 \times 10^4 \frac{m}{s})^2}{6.6743 \times 10^{-11} \frac{m^3}{kgs^2}}$$ $$M = \frac{1.34 \times 10^{20} \frac{m^3}{s^2}}{6.6743 ...


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$$M_{gal}=Rv^2/G$$ ($G=6.67\times10^{-11} (N*[m/kg]^2) $. Units of $v$ and $R$ are km/sec. and km., respectively) You gave G in MKS, then: R and v are m, m/s, $ m= (\frac {1}{10^3}) km$, that's why you got a wrong result: $ 10^3 * (10^3) ^2 = 10^9 $ that's the order of magnitude you are missing $$ 1.5*10^{11} *(3*10^4)^2/(6.6*10^{-11}) = ...


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Over long periods gravitational interactions between planets can have a very large effect on their orbits - especially if the planet you are interacting with is Jupiter. Orbits can become "adjusted" into periods which are in resonance with Jupiter's period. It is also possible for a planet to be moved to a completely different part of the Solar System by ...


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You've asked a very entertaining question, and the answer is not simple. Let's ignore collisions for the moment. The "purest" effect, that is, the one which involves no change on the part of the planet or its sun, is the effect of tidal bulges in the sun. Just as the earth, for instance, is not a perfect sphere due to tidal forces, so the sun is not a ...


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Sun is greater 330,000 / 93 mil squared / 1(earth mass) x 250,000 mil sqared = ratio of g sun to g earth towards the moon at new moon. = 2.38 The ratio of sun to earth gravity is 2.38 , so the sun is more influential. However the moon is at a velocity that precludes it from fallimg into the sun. Just as the earth has has a velocity that allows it to ...


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This is a very late answer, but no answer has been selected yet. Why do only big rocks (planets) have satellites, and not small ones? Almost 100 asteroids have satellites, and some of them are rather small. For example, asteroid 54509 YORP has a mass of only 1×1010 to 4×1010 kilograms. That sounds like a lot, but that's a body with a mean radius of ...



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