Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I can see that this question has been downvoted but I think it still deserves a proper answer. First, it is the Chandrasekhar (one word) limit, named after the Indian-American astrophysicist Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. Second, the Chandrasekhar limit does not mean that an object cannot be more massive than 1.4 times the mass of the Sun. There are plenty of ...


0

As Hritik said, it's generally better to ask one quesiton at a time, and it's also a good idea to do a little reseach yourself. Most of these questions are researchable, but they're also pretty straight forward, so I'll give it a shot. First what if anything could cause the orbit of the Earth to start to diminish start to go towards the Sun closer on ...


1

The Earth, actually, is moving away from the sun at a very slow rate. The tidal forces between the Earth-Sun pair slowly transfers the Sun's rotational energy to the Earth, and this causes the Earth to move further and further away. (albeit this happens almost unnoticeably slowly.) The Earth moon system is the most well known case when it comes to tidal ...


-1

Earth is in equilibrium in the space ( both rotational and translational) . The net ext force on earth is zero and hence torques too. Hence under any circumstance earth cannot deviate from its original path. It will continue to be moving as it was moving. There are many other theories which can lead to the decline of earth ( like black hole one) but nothing ...


2

Giving that most of the solar system's mass is concentrated in the sun, you may say that the order of magnitude of the number of atoms in the sun and in the solar system is the same. Thus, we may find this number by using the sun's mass and dividing it by the hydrogen's mass, because the sun is composed of it almost entirely: ...


6

A very brief Google search gets you the number 1,192,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 (approximately $10^{57}$ atoms)- but in fact this is wrong. That value is derived from the mass of the objects of the solar system (mostly the Sun) divided by the mass of a proton (which is what most of the Sun is made of). But the ...


1

To quote from Will's book (Theory and Experiment in Gravitational Physics, Rev. Ed., Cambridge, 1993), "[...] in almost all experiments discussed in this book, the observable effects of torsion are negligible". Will then mentions a counterexample (Ni, Phys. Rev. D 19, 2260 (1979)), but that example is a specific theory in which torsion propagates and ...



Top 50 recent answers are included