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You don't say what simulation technique you are using, but clearly errors are adding energy to the system. A simple one would be to take a starting position $(x,y)$ and velocity $(v_x,v_y)$. Note that if your velocity is not exactly right for a circular orbit, you should just get an ellipse that is close to the circle you are after, so that is not your ...


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First we need to clear up a number of fundamental problems. Always use units. You give all these numbers, but no sense of whether they are meters or nanoseconds or newtons or furlongs. You should read up on significant figures. There is no point in writing out all those digits, since past the first one or two they are all uncertain. In science, writing out ...


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So I figured it out--wasn't too hard. First, we need to decide what it means for the mass to have "flipped over" The point where the mass flips is the point where the absolute angle it makes with the normal is bigger than 180 degrees: So when all we need to do is find the first time when $|\theta_{2}|>\pi$. That can be done with any programming ...


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For the sake of doing a strict units analysis in data conversions, to confirm that the code converts correctly; for that, each variable must be documented with the correct units. Then you're straight outa luck (or some cruder version of SOL). This unsigned eight bit integer contains a value that represents a temperature in a non-standard unit. The value ...


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255 values sounds like the value that can be contained in a single byte. The person who created this "code" wanted to be able to represent "reasonable" temperatures with a single byte - they decided they wanted resolution better than 1°C, and they wanted to go down to "about as cold as you can get". This means that the conversion is as follows: From "C" ...


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The units are probably in degrees Celsius. Whenever you add physical quantities together, they must have the same units. You can't add meters to kilograms (although you can multiply them or divide them). The result of such a thing would be nonsensical. However, you can add meters to meters. In your case, you are multiplying degrees by 2. If '2' is ...



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