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12

First off, physics tends to provide a very good background for people who move on to study problems in other areas, which is perhaps why there is a lot of cross-over to computer science. However, there are also a number of areas at the interface of computer science and physics which attract people from both sides: Computer hardware (which is generally ...


11

I'll chip in here because I'm a research student and I work with a stellar evolution code (the Cambridge STARS code) more-or-less daily. Regarding some of the comments to the question, stellar evolution is actually quite fast, depending what code you use. Certainly, it isn't like hydrodynamics or N-body simulations like those used in galaxy ...


9

It most certainly exist outside secret labs :) Like Gerben wrote, the fields are called molecular dynamics (MD) and quantum chemistry which, as computers grow faster, will be essential tools of nanotechnology and medicine. Molecular Dynamics is currently implemented by making certain approximations in that electron motion is not explicitely modelled. In ...


9

You can perform $\LaTeX$ search - that is, write formula in LaTeX in an appropriate search engine: http://www.latexsearch.com/ However, as one can type the same expression in different ways and with different symbols, I never used it it practice. (Anyone did?)


9

The two main free destop programs that I know about, Stellarium and Celestia, do not include the proper motion of the stars when they move forward and backward in time. At least according to documentation that I've seen. These programs claim to do it but I have no experience with them: Home Planet (free) Starry Night (commercial) The Sky (commercial) ...


8

First of all, I do not have any experience with this, I am an Astronomy hobbyist at best. So I am just going to present what I found with minimal comment at this time. I found this web page that links to several programs: http://nbody.sourceforge.net/ They link to the University of Washington and their n-body shop. I don't know what your status must be ...


7

Yes, NASA's FTools software contains a program that will do this for you. Go to the FTools website and download a copy of the HEATOOLS. You want to specify that you want the Fimage package on the download page. Since you're running windows, you'll proabably need to download the PC-Cygwin package and install Cygwin as well as there is no native Windows ...


6

There are, of course, a lot of codes floating around. Which of them you should choose, depends on what you want to calculate exactly. Here I mention four possibilities: 1) CALHEP - this package takes you from a given Lagrangian through its Feynmann rules to the calculation of cross sections. 2) xloops - this package calculates the 1-PI Feynman diagrams ...


6

This probably isn't exactly what you're looking for, but if you're looking for the time-independent bound states of a system, the Fourier grid Hamiltonian method may be applicable. Here is an application of it to the following strange-looking potential well: Here are a few low-energy bound states: And here are some of the high-energy ...


5

Dithering is as much an art as a science and depends on many factors including, but not limited to: The type of object being observed (point source, small extended object, large extended object) Telescope parameters (The field of view of the telescope relative to the size of the object, optical quality, size and type of abberations, etc) The quality of the ...


5

If you don't already have an estimate of where you are pointing, the only other option I know of is WCSFixer. There also used to be the Pittsbugh WCS correction service, but it seems to be defunct now. These tools only work with FITS files, so your first step would be converting whatever format you have into a FITS file. The FITS website has a FITS viewer ...


4

From my reasoning and knowledge of one CS professor who has a PhD in astronomy: Above all, the answer depends on your definition of what a "computer scientist" is. What do you mean by "computer scientist"? Someone who does research in a computer science department? Or does perhaps artificial intelligence, algorithm development, or grid computing for a ...


4

I think the main reason why this is so common is that many people who are of the tenured professor age now (50-60) were in graduate school before most colleges offered a Ph.D. in computer science. So back then, people who were interested in theoretical computer science got their doctorate in Mathematics, and people who were interested in applied computer ...


4

For statistical analysis Gnumeric works very well, as it has passed a lot of statistical test. This report explains why it is a much better choice than Excel. Of course there is also R, which is the largest free statistical package and is used in a lot of research areas. Personally I think going the plain python route is also not a bad idea, as there is ...


4

The closest program to the description is Phun: http://phun.en.softonic.com/ Download it, it's a lot of fun. Oh, I see, you want 3D immediately. Ambitious enough so that I won't erase my answer. Update, May 2012. You may try to download trial of Wolfram System Modeler, http://www.wolfram.com/system-modeler/


4

Is there a complete physics simulator that I can use to do general simulations for learning purposes? Any Turing complete programming language. Some assembly required. We often say that all models are wrong, so whatever problem you desire to simulate is working on some level of abstraction of more fundamental physical laws. These are generally ...


4

Since you say you're a programmer, I see where criterion #1 comes from. But telescopes are not computers, you can't upgrade the CPU today, the RAM tomorrow, and so on. A scope is defined largely by its aperture (the diameter of the objective lens or mirror). That puts a major cap on pretty much everything else, performance-wise. Aperture is like an old ...


4

I think it simply means that you didn't choose the point in the parameter space that gives the Higgs mass you want. Try and increase $\tan \beta$ and/or $m_0, m_{1/2}, A$ and see how this affects the mass of the lightest Higgs. And yes, this little $h_0$ is a SM-like Higgs. To answer the question in your title, the mass of the lightest Higgs in the MSSM is ...


4

Goptical GNU-Optical Description Goptical is a C++ optical design and simulation library. Goptical is free software and is part of the GNU project. It provides model classes for optical components, surfaces and materials. It enables building optical systems by creating and placing various optical components in a 3d space and simulates light propagation ...


4

As mentioned in the comments, you need one more piece of information to determine the magnitude of the velocity. You said that you might use the eccentricity, so in that case you can use the formula given here and deduce a quadratic equation on the velocity which yields: $$ v= \sqrt{\frac{G M}{r \sin(\alpha)} (1 \pm \epsilon)}, $$ where $G$ is the ...


3

There are many, many algorithms and pieces of software to do this. In addition to Molecular Dynamics, there are also methods based on statistical simulations in Quantum Monte Carlo, and density functional theory as implemented in programs like Quantum Espresso. It is a simple and worthwhile exercise to program these things yourself - if you wish to study ...


3

Simulating the time-evolution of thousands of molecules interacting is generally the domain of molecular dynamics. MD codes usually dramatically simplify calculation by modelling atoms classically, generally with predefined connectivity, heavy parameterisation and bonds modeled by harmonic potentials. Whilst such approaches can give decent results for things ...


3

There was a similar question at Mathoverflow. I think it contains some useful references and discussion so it's definitely worth checking out. Usually I would post this as a comment under the question but probably nobody would notice it anymore. And seeing that the other answer is also quite short I hope this is fine.


3

There are a number of commercial packages you can use for such purposes. Comsol multiphysics simulation software is a general purpose physics modelling software package that I belive can deal with electromagnitism. The link to their website is http://www.uk.comsol.com. Ansys is another commercial vendor that provides a electromagnetic physics module. There ...


3

The industrial tool is zemax; however, it is very expensive. If you just want to make diagrams, the TeX package pst-optics might do the trick. In the gaussian beam regime, optocad (free) is a tool often used in the laser interferometer gravitational wave detector community.


3

Some static ones: Zotero Firefox plugin for Visual Understanding Environment CiteSpace Thesis visualization There are dynamical ones: PaperCube by Peter Bergstrom (it's a pity the program is working only on a demo database, the sole arXiv database would be great) Web of Science - Citation map (nice, but for seeing not exploring + only for WOS) (I ...


3

The Hartree potential is typically calculated not through the integral you're giving, but by solving Poisson's equation. Look here or there for details about this calculation applied to DFT, and here for what I found to be a good lower-level introduction to Poisson solvers in general. Good luck for your quest, it's really a nontrivial thing to do! As an ...



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