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To say I am skeptical would be an understatement. I briefly worked on this around 1997 and what I see here, although it matches his description of what he wanted, in no ways matches the effects he claimed for his "original" which exhibited massive positive feedback, ionization, extreme cooling and massive antigravity effects. The over-unity claims were just ...


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The scales and scopes of the models we do have are far larger than cellular level. Further, while there are skeletal models for animal bodies, the models for their motion is very much top-down modelling rather than bottom-up modelling. That is, an actual human's motions will be recorded and interpolated into the model, or an animator will pose the model in ...


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As a chemist turned engineer, I think I am well placed to answer this question. Does there exist a graphics engine that is as true to our reality as possible given our current understanding of physics? Given appropriate constraints and simplifications, it is possible to build a useful model from simple elements. Whether you consider this "true to ...


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Yes, the refraction index will be changed, but the absorption will differ even more. Look at similar situation. (P.S. I'd like to add this as comment but I cant yet, cause of reputation)


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Assume also that I have access to an immense amount of parallel computing processing power (I do). Unless you are an important person in the Chinese computational science world (using Tianhe-2), or you have access to secret government computers us mere mortals don't know exist (so they don't appear in rankings of the best supercomputers in the world), I ...


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The simplest solution is to find the center of mass of the two objects - at any moment in time, if the stars are a distance $d$ apart, and their respective masses as $m_1$ and $m_2$, then the center of mass is found at a distance $x$ from $m_1$ where $$x = d \frac{m_2}{m_1+m_2}$$ From this you can see that if $m_1 >> m_2$, the center of mass will be ...


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Most of the time, scientific computer code is written in such a way that variables have no "knowledge" of the units they are intended to represent. (Of course, you could be arbitrarily sophisticated in the way you write your program, e.g. by defining classes that keep track of dimensionality and used units, and then use these classes to define your ...


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The simplest way to look at this is to consider separately the horizontal and vertical velocity/position. For a projectile launched at angle $\theta$ and velocity $v$, the components are: Horizontal velocity $$v_h = v\cos\theta$$ Vertical velocity $$v_v = v\sin\theta$$ The position at time $t$ is then given by $$(x, y) = (v_h\cdot t, v_v \cdot t - ...


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The diffusion is caused by collisions between the molecules due to the random thermal motion of each molecule. So you have a blob of oxygen in a box of nitrogen then they are all moving with a random velocity from the Maxwell velocity distribution. When two molecules collide, they change velocity and so they change both speed/direction. They then collide ...


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Diffusion is one of several entropic phenomena the average effect of which can be described as a purely Newtonian phenomenon. This is done via the introduction of an entropic force. For diffusion the entropic force takes the shape of a repulsive radial force directed away from the starting position of the diffusion process: $$F_r=\frac{2kT}{r}$$ Here, $k$ ...


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It sounds like you're trying to solve the Langevin Equation. This is a model of Brownian motion where the particle experiences stochastic kicks at discrete time intervals. Your force, in this case, is a random variable you draw from a distribution each time step (instead of being given by an explicit formula). For the simplest case, the "kicks" are ...



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