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Your question actually contains many questions, which are all related but not so strictly so that it is possible to give a full answer to it. Is every event in the universe related to each other? There are various ways to answer this question. Straight forwardly, we have observed that there is a finite speed at which information can propagate in our ...


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This is known as the two-body problem of modeling the interactions of two bodies. More specifically, it is called the Kepler problem, as the objects interact via an inverse-square force - gravity. If we define some parameter $u$ as $$u\equiv\frac{1}{r}\tag{1}$$ where $r$ is the radius of the orbit at some angle $\theta$, then, using the Euler-Lagrange ...


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From the wikipedia article you cited "It is important to note that the timestep involved is a function of the probability that all events j, did not occur." (note they use i in wikipedia but we are using j so I changed the quote to match) This probability is u which can be constructed from the multiple poisson distributions for each individual event ...


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In kinetic Monte Carlo, the idea is to describe a trajectory as a set of events, at which the system makes a transition from one state ($i$) to another ($j$). To generate such a trajectory, we need to randomly select both the states that are visited and the intervals between them. The time interval $t$ between a pair of events is the time in which nothing ...


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The answer to the title question (Is every event in the universe related to each other?) is clearly a no. Some events can't be related to others due to the fact that light has a finite and unsurpassable speed.


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i think PIConGPU is the best choice for simulation of laser plasma interaction especially for large scale plasma. the VLPL code has been written by Prof. Pukhov's group and isn't open source. you have to contact to him or his coworkers to get the code. if you have enough time like two or three years for your simulations, you can write your own code by ...


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The uncertainty principle is often confused with the observer effect. The former says that the certainty in position times the certainty in the momentum is greater than some constant. We think of momentum and position as two different things, but the underlying physical phenomenon may not be. Of course, none of this speaks to whether or not quantum ...


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Could the universe be accurately simulated with an infinitely powerful computer? First Could and infinitely powerful are not compatible. A system able to simulate / predict accurately anything is quite impossible : one would need a clone universe able to compute faster than the universe runs. Initial values, indistinguishability and uncertainty ...


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Any finite physical system can be simulated by a universal computer. This includes quantum systems, which could be simulated by a universal quantum computer if we knew how to build one. Quantum mechanics is deterministic in the sense that the state of the whole of physical reality at one time can be worked out from the state at an earlier time given the ...



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