Hot answers tagged

5

I assume you're talking about the numerical instabilities that arise from having an infinite potential at $r=0$. Here are three common solutions: Use a soft-core potential that behaves like $1/r$ except very close to $r=0$ where it levels off to a finite value. For example, $1/\sqrt{\epsilon+r^2}$ instead of $1/r$ is common. Add hard sphere collision ...


5

TL;DR: Yes. Although in reality you don't have unlimited floating point precision, and this will almost always break time-reversibility. I should point out that not all integrators are time-reversible. For example, predictor-corrector schemes, and most schemes that deal with constraints. The Verlet method, however, is time-reversible, even for large ...


2

With forward Euler, you're simply out of luck. Because of the way the scheme is constructed, you always make an error in momentum in the same direction, which then compounds, leading to exponential behavior. You need a symplectic integrator, the simplest being leapfrog, or any other Verlet integrator. These still won't conserve momentum on a timestep to ...


1

For a 2D planar simulation with zero friction do the following Definitions Each body has 3 degrees of freedom. These are $(x_1,y_1,\theta_1)$ and $(x_2,y_2,\theta_2)$ defined at the center of mass. Each body has mass and mass moment of inertia. These are $m_1$, $m_2$ and $Iz_1$, $Iz_2$. The contact is at point A with coordinates $(x_A,y_A)$ and with ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible