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NO Acceleration does not change at all because it is proportional to force applied and the force does not change. The effect of force does increase (sometimes decrease) something and that is velocity (speed if we are talking one dimensional). Also velocity increases continuously. It is not like it changes after every one second. If acceleration is 1 ...


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For a constant acceleration $a$ the speed is given by $v(t) = at + v_0$, where $v_0$ is the initial velocity, as you correctly used. But to find the distance you would have to integrate the last question to find that: $x(t) = \frac{1}{2}at^2 + v_0 t+ x_0$, where $x_0$ is the initial position. You can then check your results and you will find that they are ...


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Let's say for argument's sake that light is a speeding car. That's quite a silly analogy, because a car is generally thought of as some thing which can be observed while it's driving along on the road (e.g. being observed by landmarks such as delineators along the road, or by other cars), and which may observe them in turn. A similarity to light is ...


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With respect to your question, the immediate thing you need to clarify is: constant with respect to what? How SR answers that question The speed of light is usually held to be constant with respect to reference frames. In other words, if we're both at the same place in outer space, but you're passing by me in your spaceship, then every photon in either of ...


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Is the speed of light constant or does the math just happen to work out? None of the above. It's a tautology. What happens is that instead of having just one car, you count 9192631770 cars passing you by. See the defiition of the second which involves microwaves passing you by. Then you declare that a second has elapsed. If those cars are going slower, ...



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