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Yes or no, it depends what you precisely understand by this short sentence. The word "inelastic" doesn't really mean that we don't "want" to detect something. Physics doesn't say what we should "want". "Deep" means that the quarks (and perhaps the electron) penetrate very close to each other and the scattering studies the behavior of the matter at ...


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I will address: My question - Does not photon, which is supposed to be quantum of electro-magnetic field, interact with an electron "electromagnetically"? A photon and an electron are elementary particles, quantum mecanical entities. Probabilities of interaction in quantum mechanics are calculated from the wave functions of the system in QED, using ...


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The cross-section for photon-electron interaction is quite low, and requires a very high energy density optical pulse to obtain. I attempted to use this interaction during work involving ultrafast optical and electron pulses, in order to determine the temporal crossing point of the two pulse trains. Unfortunately my calculations were off by a factor of ...


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For the absolutely continuous part of the spectrum of a self-adjoint operator $H$, the "density of states" is provided by the Radon-Nikódym derivative of the spectral measure of $HP_{ac}$ with respect to Lebesgue measure, where $P_{ac}$ is the orthogonal projection onto the absolutely continuous subspace of the domain of $H$. This formula is well defined ...


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I am not sure I understand perfectly you question but formally in the canonical ensemble we can write the partition function $Q(\beta)$ as being: \begin{equation} Q(\beta) = \int\cdot \cdot \int d\mu(x)\: e^{-\beta H(x)} = \int_0^{+\infty} dE \: \rho(E)e^{-\beta E} \end{equation} where $d\mu(x)$ is the volume measure for the micro states in the system, ...


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From page 319, the $n$th coefficient of the expanded Taylor Series has a divergence degree $D = D_0 - n$, where $D_0$ is the degree of divergence of the amplitude considered (photon-photon, in this case). So we have for the first non-vanishing term $n = 4$ and so $D = 0 - 4$ .


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Compton scattering occurs when a photon impacts an atom, and is reflected with less energy, and at an angle. The larger the angle, the larger the share of the photons energy is absorbed. This proves that photons have a particle nature and posses quantized energy. Imagine a golf ball hitting a pole and getting deflected. If the pole is more massive, there ...


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When a high energetic photon (like the gamma or X ray photon) hit a charged particle like an electron, due to inelastic collision, the photon loses some energy and the electron get scattered. The energy lost by the photon will be equal to the energy gained by the scattered electron. This process of inelastic scattering of electron by a photon is called ...


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Some examples of techniques that don't necessarily involve scattering: -Mass spectrometry -Bubble chambers -Cherenkov detectors All these techinques were fundamental in the developing of modern nuclear physics and some of them are widely used still today.


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A ratio of 1 to 3 is well within the regime where the wavelength is "similar" to the object size, and diffraction/scattering effects are massively important. Without even getting into the details of diffraction patterns (which make the difference between these frequencies even more pronounced than my simplified explanation suggests), if we suppose that the ...


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1) This is just one of the basic postulates of Quantum Mechanics. Let $|\phi\rangle$ and $|\psi\rangle$ be any two normalised kets, and $Q$ be an operator. Then the matrix element of $Q$ is, by definition, $$ Q_{\phi\psi}=\langle\phi|Q|\psi\rangle $$ Now, if $\psi$ and $\phi$ are not normalised, we must take $$ ...


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The experiment certainly does produce a very general complex superposition of momentum eigenstates. The spread is not "small" in any way – virtually all allowed (by conservation laws etc.) final states are represented in the superposition for any initial state. We detect particles of particular momenta in the final states because the detectors (e.g. at the ...



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