Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

As pointed out, the cross sections for certain processes diverge in the IR. However, we know from everyday life that measurements don't diverge. In other words in any actual experiment the number of photons is finite. While physically very obvious, it is apriori unclear how QFT is consistent with this observation. Based on this observation, one might naively ...


0

You question title is broad enough that folks might find these resources useful, even though they do not address your specific electron-atom scattering in the body of the questions. Brookhaven National Laboratory hosts the National Nuclear Data Center, which includes a variety of data bases that they maintain for the nuclear physics community. It can be ...


0

This is not really an answer but it's longer than a comment and I think it's somewhat valuable so I'll put it here. Some time ago, I found myself in need of electronic dipole moment transition matrix elements for CO$_2^+$, between the ground state and the first few excited states. I thought to myself: "this is a perfectly well-defined quantity which is not ...


1

there are various databases for this sort of information. In your position I would start with http://www.vamdc.eu/ which has links to other databases and is currently maintained. It may have more information on molecules than on atoms, but I hope it is useful. Another database is Gaphyor, but an issue with this database is that it does not accept new ...


0

As I understand - you start with a barrier ($E$ being higher or lower the $V_0$) and you get a left part (incoming wave and reflected wave) and a right part (transmited wave). Suddenly - there is a new condition: $V_0 \lt 0$, which means a hole and you have one more situation =direct passage of the particle. ok. You have a reflected part with factor $R$, ...


0

There has to be some amplitude for transmission with scattering and some amplitude for transmission without scattering. The 1 in the $1+T$ term is the amplitude of the wave that does not scatter, this is just a matter of definition. The $T$ term is the amplitude for transmission by definition. The part of the wave that scatters has square amplitude $\sigma$ ...



Top 50 recent answers are included