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7

Instead of assuming the earth is made of metallic hydrogen, let's just compare Earth's density of $5.52 \times 10^3 kg/m^3$ to that of neutrons' $2.3 \times 10^{17} kg/m^3$ because degenerate matter consisting of neutrons is what you get when electrons are forced into nuclei. That's a density increase of about $4.17 \times 10^{13}$ (at least 3 orders of ...


6

When you look at crystalline substances, there is really not that much space between the atoms. What people mean when they say that an atom is mostly empty space, is that the INSIDE of the atom is very sparsely populated with stuff. This is because the stuff in question, the nucleus and the electrons, are tiny in comparison to the actual size of the atom. ...


3

Actually, the Higgs scale is not the TeV scale. The Higgs scale is the scale of electroweak symmetry breaking, i.e. $\mathcal O(100 \mathrm{GeV})$. The Terascale comes into play along with the Higgs, as supersymetry - the most popular extensions of the Standard Model - would actually like a small Higgs mass, much smaller than its measured value ($< M_Z$ ...


3

According to the same Wikipedia article you cite, ...the zero point is determined by placing the thermometer in brine: he used a mixture of ice, water, and ammonium chloride, a salt, at a 1:1:1 ratio. This is a frigorific mixture which stabilizes its temperature automatically: that stable temperature was defined as 0 °F (−17.78 °C). The second point, at ...


3

Reynold's number is defined to be: $$ \text{Re} = \frac{ v D }{ \nu } $$ where $v$ is the characteristic velocity for the flow, $D$ is a characteristic size and $\nu$ is the kinematic viscosity. Now, why should we care? Why is Reynold's number important? Well, the first thing to realize is that the Reynolds number is a dimensionless number. This means ...


2

If you want the new physics to solve the hierarchy problem, it's best if it is close to the weak scale, or else you will be left with a residual little hierarchy. You are describing the "big desert" between the weak and GUT scales. I think it was motivated by the idea that SUSY lived at the weak scale, solving the hierarchy problem and insuring gauge ...


2

The story is this, as much as I remember. Fahrenheit chose the zero point on his scale as the temperature of a bath of ice melting in a solution of common table salt (a routine 18th century way of getting a low temperature). He set $32^{\circ}$ as the temperature of ice melting in water. For a reproducible high point on the scale he chose the temperature of ...


1

At first you'd burn your hand, then it would feel like a normal rock. An orange sized Earth would cool very rapidly. If an object gets twice as big, its volume increases by $2^3$, but its surface increases only by $2^2$. You can only lose heat at the surface but you 'hold' all your heat in your interior. Simply said, the bigger something is, the harder it ...


1

As already said size of elementary particles is not so simple. Orderer from high mass to lower (add 125GeV to the Higgs): (From Matt Strassler's blog) Anyway, why don't you create an image yourself?


1

Your "sizes" sequence as one goes to smaller and smaller particles stops at the elementary particle table of the Standard Model. The Standard Model of elementary particles, with the three generations of matter, gauge bosons in the fourth column and the Higgs boson in the fifth. Here is a plot that gives sizes of particles which are composed out of ...



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