Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

2

When considering motion in a fluid, or of a fluid, there are two types of forces to consider. Everyone immediately thinks of viscous forces, which arise from the viscosity of the fluid, and as you say these disappear in a superfluid. However there are also inertial forces that arise because the fluid has a mass. Accelerating the fluid requires a force just ...


1

Here is how I would do it: From conservation of energy you find $$mgh = \frac12 m v^2 + \frac12 I \omega^2$$ And the relationship between $v$ and $\omega$: $v=\omega R$. The result then follows.


1

If I understand your question correctly, the principle of transmissibility is just the fact that, when you consider momenta, that is $\mathbf r\times\mathbf F$, you can decompose $\mathbf r$ into a component $\mathbf r_\perp$ which is perpendicular the line of action of $\mathbf F$, and another component $\mathbf r_\parallel$ which is parallel to it. Now ...


1

You can get answer to your first question here. When tires are inflated less area of the tire comes in contact with the ground, and thus there is less kinetic friction.


1

It is there, it's just hidden by the change of coordinates. Written in Cartesian coordinates, the kinetic energy is $$ T=\frac12m_1\dot{x}_1^2+\frac12m_1\dot{y}_1^2+\frac12m_2\dot{x}_2^2+\frac12m_2\dot{y}_2^2+\frac12I_1\dot\theta_1^2+\frac12I_2\dot\theta_2^2\tag{1} $$ where the last term is the rotational kinetic enregy. If you let \begin{align} ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible