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I think you have a small misconception about rotation sensing. Accelerometers will sense a frame's rotation of constant angular velocity as well as rotation where the angular velocity varies. This is because constant angular velocity rotation is itself an acceleration: something must undergo a centripetal acceleration to follow a curved path at constant ...


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What may be confusing you is that the passage you quote about the Space Shuttle is talking about speed relative to a fixed frame of reference: one fixed relative to the distant stars. On the other hand, when you think about aircraft flying through the air (or people walking along the ground), you think about a co-rotating frame of reference: fixed relative ...


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There is a slight effect on the lift requirement for an aircraft. A "stationary" object on the equator is actually traveling in a circle, at one earth-circumference per sidereal day velocity. That lessens its apparent weight because it is accelerating toward the center of the earth (centripetal acceleration). The effective gravitational constant (g minus ...


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Actually it's not like that when Earth is rotating all the objects in it's gravitational influence will also move with the same angular velocity $w$ so even if you are at certain height you are still stuck with your initial point but you can contradict it simply by using another external force which can cancel out your gravitational pull or you can go up to ...


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Translations and rotations are not different. A rotation is a general state of motion, and a pure translation is a degenerate form of rotation. In fact a translation is just an indication that rotation occurs at a distance, just as a torque is an indication that a force is acting on a distance and angular momentum is an indication that something at a ...


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What is the difference between "observed" and "true" angles of rotation? What I think you mean is that the "true" angle is "specific" to the compound. It is defined like absorption coefficient $\beta$ as a constant of proportionality : $absorption \space A = coefficient \space \beta \times concentration \space C \times path \space length \space L$ $...


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For your first question you want to find a way to express the observered angle in polarization in a form that is independent of the concentration of the molecule and pathlength of the light. In other words you are looking for units of angle per concentraion pathlength and you need to divide by the concentration and pathlength. Of course when you want to ...


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You say everything orbits counterclockwise, what does that mean? Think of any of the examples you gave, You can look at them from a different point of view and they will appear to be traveling clockwise. I'd love to see the source of this information. That all electrons and planets only move counterclockwise.


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Conservation of angular momentum means if a nebula is rotating the systems formed once it collapses will also rotate in the same direction. This is the reason for your observed 'anti-clockwise' rotation. Nothing metaphysical just a simple symmetry of physics.



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