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It sounds like what you're looking for in general is an SSTO (Single Stage To Orbit -- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-stage-to-orbit -- meaning it doesn't drop off boosters on the way up) rocket with a high payload fraction ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Payload_fraction -- meaning most of the spacecraft isn't fuel and fuel tank). Unfortunately, ...


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The answer based on accepted physics is trivial: none. That's why they call it science FICTION. One can theoretically reduce the amount of propellant, but then the required power these ships would have to develop would go trough the roof. Keep in mind that a medium sized rocket develops on the order of 10GW of power for a few minutes during first stage burn ...


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Hopefully not to add confusion, if the question was more about getting somewhere beyond Earth and not about launching satellites into orbit. Those who grew up during the "space race" should know that every mission to the Moon went partially around the Earth first. It's not the shortest distance but it's the most efficient because of what was called a ...


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I'm sure this is an incomplete answer, and would only add to those already excellent, more knowledgeable answers, but I do know that rocket scientists try to situate their launch site as close to the equator as they can, so the Earth's diameter gives some extra "throw" as compared to higher latitudes. I expect when the rocket tilts toward the horizontal, it ...


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It's not efficient that way. There is something called gravity turn. You need sideways velocity to stay in orbit and gravity turn essentially assists the rocket to turn sideways.


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I highly recommend you download Kerbal Space Program and see for yourself! Typically the goal of a satellite is to orbit, and thus as the other answers address, you must build significant horizontal velocity. Indeed if the Earth didn't have an atmosphere, you could orbit a few km above the surface, so the main goal is building enough orbital (horizontal) ...


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It sounds like you are imagining that what satellites do is go up through the atmosphere, break though into outer space, and hang there. That is not right. If you simply go straight up to outer space (say 300 km above Earth's surface), gravity will pull you right back down, even if you've left the atmosphere, and you'll crash back into the Earth. Gravity is ...


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Rockets take the shortest path to reach their orbit. If all we want to do is pop up to LEO and come back down again, then we do go straight up. See the first two Mercury missions for an example - they landed north of Nassau. If you want to end up in orbit, you need substantial horizontal speed. Turning at right angles is the least fuel-efficient way to do ...


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The International Space Station is in low Earth orbit, only about 400 km above the surface according to this page, or about 1.063 time Earth's radius. This means that, air resistance aside, getting the International Space Station to escape the Earth's gravitational pull would be nearly as difficult as launching a payload with the same mass from the Earth's ...


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If i understand you correctly, you want the real dv change considering drag, varying air density, engine efficiency and overall pretty much everything? In that case, there is no analytical solution. You have to integrate numerically.


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I made a simple Excel spreadsheet to calculate this. Some simplifying assumptions: Mass = 66 gram (during thrust), 33 gram (after burn) Cd = 0.5 (like for sphere) rho = 1.22 (air) Simple numerical (Newton) integration of equation of motion (0.1 second time step) Resulting curve: Height of about 300 m, total flight time just under 14 seconds. Based on ...


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You have to integrate all the forces over time. As soon as the rocket is flying, drag acts as a downward force that reduces altitude and since drag depends on velocity there is no simple equation you can just plug it all into. I recently started programming a rocket simulation, if i plug in the numbers into that: delta mass = 10.22g Isp = 99.74s assuming ...



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