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For a reversible process, the overall change in entropy is zero (i.e. no entropy is created). However, entropy can be transferred between different systems and the environment through reversible processes. For a system transferring heat/work to/from its environment - as I understand it, for an internally reversible process, no irreversibilities exist within ...


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Entropy is a state function, correct ! But entropy itself depends upon how you got to that state (final state). In thermodynamics Entropy is considered the quality of heat (hotness/coolness) whereas temperature is considered quantity/degree of heat (hotness/coolness). The reversible processes (and adiabatic i.e. no heat exchange) do not mess with the ...


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Adiabatic process would mean no heat transfer between the surrounding and the system. Irreversiblility would mean entropy definitely changed after the process. Let's say, entropy increased (which is obviously natural) after the process. The increase in entropy of the system is because its volume is suddenly increased (and so did the disorder and ...


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There is a general formula to get the entropy change between two states $A$ and $B$ for a system, that is: \begin{equation} \Delta S_{A \rightarrow B} = \int_{\Gamma^{rev}(A \rightarrow B)} \: \frac{\delta Q_{rev}(\Gamma)}{T} \end{equation} It states that the variation of entropy of a system between the states $A$ and $B$ can always (even for irreversible ...


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The example they're considering is a spontaneous (irreversible) process which occurs within a rigid container in water bath - i.e., at constant $T$ and $V$. Integrating the differential \begin{equation} \text{d}A = -S\text{d}T -P \text{d}V \end{equation} along a path of constant $T$ and $V$, you get the result that $\Delta A = 0$. The apparent ...



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