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I am using a computation book with very specific procedures of derivation and I find it very helpful with my daily study,but it focuses on the quantum computation methods, the writers are Nielsen & Chuang. this is the free access to this book: http://pan.baidu.com/share/link?shareid=3745380098&uk=2049226949


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I am using this.(freely available) http://farside.ph.utexas.edu/teaching/329/329.html A complete set of lecture notes for an upper-division undergraduate computational physics course. Topics covered include scientific programming in C, the numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, particle-in-cell codes, and Montecarlo methods.


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I know these aren't necessarily great references, but I recently read these two interesting articles about it: http://www.wired.com/2014/06/the-new-quantum-reality/ http://www.kpopstarz.com/articles/111389/20140913/fluid-dynamics-quantum-mechanics.htm


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If you don't know the mathematical topics to study that might mean that you are a starter. And if you are planning to learn it by yourself, you might want to study demystified qm. It has a lot of errata in it. But it goes through each and every example in detail. It doesnt use differential integral though (at least till the chapter i have covered) . It ...


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There is probably a closed question covering all this, if someone has the courage to go and dig it up. Anyway, to study QM you need knowledge of differential calculus, matrices (and in particular Hermitian matrices), a good understanding of classical mechanics (Hamiltonian formulation, and the concept of "turning points"). To go further, consider Lie ...


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There are only two open source GR/tensor packages that I am aware of, Cadabra (coordinate-free) and Maxima/xwMaxima (coordinate based, ctensor, itensor and atensor packages)


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A good database with several materials could be found here RefractiveIndex.INFO . It could be accesed online por download un different formats.


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I would not recommend either of the choices you mentioned. If you have Mathematica, and your needs in general relativity are fairly basic (computing connections, curvature, geodesics), then I recommend using the notebooks from Hartle's text freely available here. If your needs are more advanced, or you need something more capable, I would suggest using ...


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I would recommend you some Soviet Classics. I E Irodov's Basic Laws of Electromagnetism is a good book to start with. For application-level problms, see his Problems in General Physics. And since you are so curious, it must be the right choice.


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Peskin & Schroeder is really difficult and time taking books for beginning, it's exercises are not suited at all and there is least compatibility with preceding chapter. It has very bad approach to QED. And will kill all motivation to pursue. The book by Zee, Quantum Field Theory in a Nutshell, is good for someone with background on gravity and condense ...


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The rigorous answer is that experimentally you can prove that something exists, not that something doesn't exist. We proved that the electron exist, because we found it. But about the non-signaling, we can do one type experiment, two types, three, etc. And if none of the three experiments transmits FTL (faster-than-light), can we conclude that no type of ...


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Try either of Weinberg's books. Read his 1972 book to prep for his 2008 book because he uses a lot of results from the former in the latter. You'll also need a background in quantum field theory (electron scattering), the standard model (nucleosynthesis), thermodynamics (CMB), special functions (Jackson-tier special functions in some parts) and statistical ...


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The best book about QM for beginners I know is by the Nobel Prize Claude Cohen-Tannoudji, coauthored with Bernard Diu and Frank Laloë. Mécanique quantique. 2 cols. Collection Enseignement des Sciences. Paris. (Quantum Mechanics. Vol. I & II, 1991. Wiley, New-York). Even I could understand it.


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A second recommendation for the A zee book. I'd say GRAVITATION is the goal,but I'd get there by: "Exploring Blackholes" by Wheeler, nice intro, stops at Schwartzchild. then the soft introduction provided by piccioni, which exists in many places (amazon, nook, oyster) but not in print, oddly. "General Relativity" 1-3. The other books in the series might ...


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There is a rather small section on the topic in the book "Differential Forms with Applications to the Physical Sciences" by H. Flanders. I don't find this extremely satisfactory, but what I'd do instead is take any book on fluid mechanics which has some consistent vector calculus notation and start "translating" it into the corresponding geometric notions. ...


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All physics knowledge does not exist on one centralized database. No matter how complete it is, there would always be some scrap of physics knowledge that exists on another database only. If there were a centralized database of all physics knowledge, I can assure you it would not be peer-reviewed. The peer review process is too lengthy for one database to do ...


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Geometric Algebra for Physics by Doran and Lasenby (Cambridge University Press) has an introduction to Quantum Mechanics. The quantum section starts 250 pages into the text, and not surprising is a spin-first type introduction to quantum mechanics. It does into the detail of a spin 1/2 system and notes the similarity to to the properties of rotors ...


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i think if we follow the Ray D' Inverno book intitled Introducing Einstein Relativity then we get easily this metric. on chapter 19 it is explanied in a very simple method


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This thread is a year old, but I felt the need to make this book known. The following book is perhaps what you seek: Special Relativity in General Frames: From Particles to Astrophysics. Eric Gourgoulhon. Springer (Graduate Texts in Physics), 2013. It is destined to be a classic text on the subject. It adopts a four-dimensional point of view from the ...



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