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This answer contains some additional resources that may be useful. Please note that answers which simply list resources but provide no details are strongly discouraged by the site's policy on resource recommendation questions. This answer is left here to contain additional links that do not yet have commentary. Acoustics by L. Beranek An Introduction to ...


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I would like to suggest the book I am folfollowing presently-NCERT 11th Grade CChemsitry.It explains in an intuitive and interesting way the basics of QM. It is free for download on ncert.nic.in MIT opencourseware provides neat lectures. Ted-ed is amazing too (but I prefer MIT ocw). For mathematics-you can get great content on Khanacademy.org Regards,do ...


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Some algebraic geometry with the main purpose of understanding D-branes in the context of mirror symmetry is reviewed in Paul Aspinwall's 'D-branes on Calabi-Yau manifolds' (http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/0403166). I have not begun reading it thoroughly myself, but it seems accessible to physicists, at least those with the basic math background for string ...


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There is a book on the topic: B. Andrei Bernevig, Taylor L. Hughes: Topological Insulators and Topological Superconductors, Princeton University Press (2013).


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I think two great reviews on the topic (cited by almost any paper on the matter) are: M. Z. Hasan and C. L. Kane, Colloquium: Topological insulators, Rev. Mod. Phys. 82, 3045 (2010); X.-L. Qi and S.-C. Zhang, Topological insulators and superconductors, Rev. Mod. Phys. 83, 1057 (2011);


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Most any quantum mechanics textbook will discuss molecular resonances. The classic book on molecular resonant frequencies is Spectra of diatomic molecules by Gerhard Herzberg. For larger molecules, you will want to consult Infrared and Raman spectra of polyatomic molecules, also by G. Herzberg. As for the microwave issue, the second link that you cite, ...


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I would recommend S.T. Yau's book on Mathematical Aspects of String Theory, following @Tomas Smith. There is also a two volume set based on lectures given at Princeton. The books can be found on Amazon at http://www.amazon.com/Quantum-Fields-Strings-Course-Mathematicians/dp/0821820125 and ...


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"Theory of Elasticity" by Timoshenko and Goodier has explanations of a lot of solid mechanics of isotropic solids in the elastic regime. Also useful for the same general area is "Theory of Elasticity" by Landau and Lifshitz. If you find them rather heavy going then "Electromechanics and MEMS" by Jones and Nenadic has easier derivations of some particular ...


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I came across this one recently. It had a good chapter on stress and strain with a lot of derivation. Coming from Physics, not Engineering, it was a good primer. Lots of equations, derivations and prose. Polymer Engineering Science and Viscoelasticity: An Introduction By Hal F. Brinson, L. Catherine Brinson http://www.springer.com/us/book/9781489974846 ...


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The American Association Institute of Physics (AIP; the parent organization of the APS and AAPT among others) publishes The Physics Teacher, which publishes articles on pedagogy and exposition. Their blurb reads: Dedicated to the strengthening of the teaching of introductory physics at all levels, The Physics Teacher provides peer-reviewed materials to ...


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Reviews of Modern Physics has been created exactly with that scope, as you can see in the link. Feynman's article on the path integral approach, for example, was published on this journal. Physics Reports is similar to Rev. Mod. Phys. albeit the article submission is by invitation only. Reports on Progress in Physics is another one.


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I'm not sure if this is what you're looking for, but physics news websites, like phys.org and nature news are really good for "exposition" of different topics. I'm a PhD student in physics and I use phys.org and nature news and views (http://www.nature.com/subjects/physics#news-and-views) to have a non-technical source for other physical subjects and if I'm ...


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Assuming you are asking undergraduate mechanics book. I found the one used by Caltech is unbelievably awesome. The Mechanical Universe: Mechanics and Heat, Advanced Edition by Steven C. Frautschi, Richard P. Olenick, Tom M. Apostol, David L. Goodstein (pick the advanced edition intead of introduction edition) The good parts of this book: It teaches ...


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I like a 1941 text Stratton Electromagnetic field and Waves and also Like Born and Wolf which is elegant and clearly written. I like another old Text Rojanski. I also like the latest version of Purcell which is in MKS units and has answers to problems in the back


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Right now, I'm using a book entitled " An Introduction to Wavelets through Linear Algebra" by Micheal Frazier. Published in 1999, it's still a pretty good book, and contains a nifty refresher to linear algebra as well.


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Walecka's graduate level text Theoretical Nuclear and Subnuclear Physics focuses on developing the theory in detail. He follows the historical development most of the time, but skips over big chucks that don't lead in the direction he is going. That direction is actually about laying the foundation for being able to do JLAB-style transition-regime physics ...


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Have you tried Samuel Wong's book "Introductory Nuclear Physics"? I used in for both undergraduate and graduate nuclear physics and found it very useful. It seemed to have less handwaving than many other traditional texts.


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Introduction to Plasma Physics by Francis Chen is probably one of the best sources for introductory plasma physics, despite being slightly dated (publication date of 1995) and using CGS units. It covers, among other things, particle motions in E&M fields plasmas as fluids (e.g., MHD) plasmas as particles (kinetic theory) controlled fusion As a ...



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