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This answer contains some additional resources that may be useful. Please note that answers which simply list resources but provide no details are strongly discouraged by the site's policy on resource recommendation questions. This answer is left here to contain additional links that provide little or no commentary. Staelin's Electromagnetic Waves. This is ...


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There are of course many books out there, quantum statistics is a really well-established field, so regardless of suggestions here you should really look further on your own as well and find one that suits you best. But here are a few that I've used in the past that you may find useful: Statistical mechanics: A survival guide by Mike Glazer and Justin ...


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The Walter Lewin Classical Mechanics lectures contain lots of good demonstrations. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUdYlQf0_sSsb2tNcA3gtgOt8LGH6tJbr


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I'm not familiar with "Modern Analytical Mechanics" by Pellegrini & Cooper so I can't comment on that one but I'm very familiar with the other two books you mentioned. Landau's books are generally excellent but tend to be shorter in length and sometimes very dense. Nearly every paragraph has some profound insight that you'll miss if you don't ponder ...


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This may not be quite what you're after, but "Relativistic Hydrodynamics" by Rezzolla and Zanotti covers (relativistic) hydrodynamics in the language of differential geometry. This is a graduate level textbook on hydrodynamics in the context of general relativity (hence the differential geometry). It covers kinetic theory (including quantum effects), ...


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There is a book "Exact Solutions of Einstein’s Field Equations" by Hans Stephani, Dietrich Kramer, Malcolm MacCallum, Cornelius Hoenselaers and Eduard Herlt where classified solutions are given. Table of contents: http://assets.cambridge.org/97805214/61368/toc/9780521461368_toc.pdf


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I've been looking at this Java archive General Relativity (GR) Package written by Wolfgang Christian, Mario Belloni, and Anne Cox It includes a lot of simple programs about Newtonian mechanics, special relativity and general relativity, including the aforementioned GROrbits. It doesn't permit custom metrics - you are limited to Schwarzschild ...


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For particle/light motion in 2D space, my nomination would be GROrbits It's free and requires a JVM to run, there is also a web start version for the brave ;) Sorry but I've never found anything aimed at visualizing metrics or curvature (apart from plotting programs of course).


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Use Google Scholar search! It turns up the paper when searching for 2012 J. Stat. Phys. 148 513-547 or even J. Stat. Phys. 148 513-547 Barring a good academic search engine, a longer route is using something like Web Of Knowledge or Scopus, but those both need subscriptions which, in light of Google's excellent search engine, seems a bit daft. A third ...


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I'm not completely sure what you want, but honestly the entirety of Spivak's Calculus on manifolds is devoted to exactly that. If you want something that feels familiar, you can simply find $\nabla$ in various coordinate systems in Wikipedia, but if you want a less coordinate-centric view then you're probably going to need to step outside of your comfort ...


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I would say that the Wikipedia page on curvilinear coordinates and the article Mathematical Physics Lessons - Gradient, Divergence and Curl in Curvilinear Coordinates by James Foadi are enough to understand what is going on.


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Wikipedia does a pretty good job at explaining the basics of this, in my opinion. Looking at review papers are very good for this and so are the papers(you can find the papers on sites like Pubmed and APS Journals). Just because the review papers are from the 80s, does not mean they are bad. Even if a tiny fraction of the information has changed it is still ...


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I second The Cartoon Guide to Physics by Larry Gonick, but I also have to add Einstein for Beginners by Joseph Schwartz. Those two books are probably the most responsible for getting me into my physics career. I'd also give a big nod to Thinking Physics: Understandable Practical Reality by Lewis Carroll Epstein. This is a phenomenal choice for excellent ...


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I really recommend 4 books in 3 steps 1)Mathematics for physics, Michael Stone Paul Goldbart 2)Modern Mathematical Physics, Peter Szekeres 3)Geometry for Physics, T. Frankel with An introduction to Manifolds, Loring W. Tu After all, The Road to Reality, Roger Penrose


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I don't know how much you are adept at mathematics but before you begin physics, you ought to study calculus from Thomas' Calculus & Differential & Integral Calculus by Richard Courant. Now, first of all, you'll come across Newtonian Mechanics. For this, I would recommend A.P.French's Newtonian Mechanics. Unlike Lectures of Feynman(though they are ...


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You can read the utterly fantastic Feynman Lectures on Physics which is free for online viewing at the link provided. I would also recommend Feynman's Tips on Physics: Reflections, Advice, Insights, Practice - A Problem-Solving Supplement to the Feynman Lectures on Physics. My University uses Giancoli as well as the textbook for introductory physics, but I ...


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The textbook my school uses for my AP Physics 2 course is the fifth revised edition Giancoli textbook. Like you, I am reading ahead and trying to absorb as much information as possible. I am sure many high school physics books are a great starting place to go further in studying physics at your level, but do not forget there are many resources online too. ...


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A further investigation led me to the desired reference, which discusses this precise problem: Hard Superconductivity: Theory of the Motion of Abrikosov Flux Lines Work of Anderson and Kim, at Bell Labs, around 1964


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This is not a full answer to the question, but just to point out existing related studies. This kind of question was considered a lot in the context of Josephson junction, which is basically a superconducting ring but with a weak link (i.e. the junction), where intuitively vortices tunnel through the junction. The simplest model of such a system is just the ...


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Any series of textbooks or a general work on physics that start from classical mechanics and goes all the way up to electromagnetism (and even quantum mechanics if you like) would be good choice, this way you won't get confused by different notations and you won't lack any assumed knowledge because you stay within the framework of one series or book. I have ...


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Where should i start in physics? As I also mentioned as an answer to a similar question: http://physics.stackexchange.com/a/154425/4962 a great overview and understanding of physics, starting from scratch, can be achieved by studying topics in this order: Kinematics (motion) Dynamics (forces) Rotational kinematics and dynamics Collisions (momentum ...


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Not the Feynman lecture. It is too hard even for freshman in physics. Assuming you want to be a good physicist. Books are too early for you right now. Your first priority is get excel in your school work in these sense (ALL important): 1.) Do a lot of problem set 2.) Then ask yourself what you have learned when finished working on a problem. 3.) Discuss ...


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"The Feynman lectures" are an amazing gem for learning physics and are available online for free.


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Introducing Quantum Theory: A graphic guide is a very good graphical book. It really provokes one to study more and more in this area. It uses the Pilot wave theory which is a negative point. Neverthless, the pictures are really breathetaking! Physicists here explain their contributions & the problems by themselves! Being jealous at the Solvay ...


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I was thinking about building my virtual elastic bodies as systems of "nodes", each with a certain mass, interconnected by springs. You just described Finite Element Modeling - the cornerstone of mechanical engineering, and the method used for making sure that that bridge won't collapse when an 18 wheeler passes over it. This is an extremely well ...


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No, there's not a map of all the black holes in the galaxy, remember they're quite hard to detect, but there's one of stars in our solar interstellar neighborhood.


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I don't think you can get much better than the physical books Susskind and Hrabovsky's "The Theoretical Minimum". If the words "hamiltonian" and "lagrangian" sound scary to you, then you should pick up both the book "What you need to know to start doing physics" and the book "Quantum Mechanics: The Theoretical Minimum". The math isn't dumbed down, but is ...


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As far as cosmology is concerned, the book which I consider to be THE best for a mathematical treatment of cosmology, is AK Raychaudhuri's "General relativity, astrophysics, and cosmology". It is excellently presented, Raychudhuri doesn't shy away from the math, and the old-school style makes it all the more elegant. So, I would STRONGLY recommend it. I ...


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Just a quick preliminary answer, I will fix it later. The connection to general relativity is a change of variables in which the metric is replaced by a "spin connection" and a "frame field". These quantities can then be arranged in a new matrix, so the metric field has been rewritten as a different matrix-valued field, and the transformations ...



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