New answers tagged

1

Collected Papers of L.D. Landau edited by D. Ter Haar The Discovery of Super Fluidity These above books might help you. Start doing your own research, this is how we study.


0

Vorticity and Incompressible Flow - Andrew J. Majda, New York University Andrea L. Bertozzi, Duke University, North Carolina The above one is pretty much for beginners, with a good mathematical background it is good for you. After reading this you may also read the book 'Vorticity and Vortex Dynamics by Jie-Zhi Wu, Hui-Yang Ma, Ming-De Zhou', it's not ...


0

You might want to target a book on $Characterization Methods$ also. John Hudson out of RPI taught an excellent course which was right to the point, but I don't know if he ever published the materials. I'm sure there are books that survey the field.


0

Adding two more in the list... Gravitation: Foundations and Frontiers by T. Padmanabhan An Introduction to General Relativity and Cosmology by J. Plebanski and A. Krasinski


0

Chis Pope's notes are very useful - http://people.physics.tamu.edu/pope/ihplec.pdf


0

There are a couple of books that explain quantum mechanics fairly well with no technical prerequisites. "The Fabric of Reality" by David Deutsch explains a lot about quantum mechanics. See especially chapters 2,9 and 11. "The Beginning of Infinity" by David Deutsch, chapter 11 and 12.


0

what is dark matter ??? We know how much dark energy there is because we know how it affects the Universe's expansion. Other than that, it is a complete mystery. But it is an important mystery. It turns out that roughly 68% of the Universe is dark energy. Dark matter makes up about 27%. The rest - everything on Earth, everything ...


2

Anthony Zee just came out with Group Theory in a Nutshell for Physicists - covers most of what a undergrad physics student needs including finite groups and representations, except Young diagrams.


0

I was able to find an answer to my question in literature. The reference is: A.S. Wightman, "Introduction to some aspects of quantizes fields", in "Lectures notes, Cargese Summer School, 1964". At the bottom of p. 204 Wightman writes ".. there is no such mathematical object as a free scalar field of mass zero in two-dimensional space-time unless one of the ...


8

This list is extensive, but not exhaustive. I am aware that there are more standard GR books out there such as Hartle and Schutz, but I don’t think these are worth mentioning. Books with stars are, in my opinion, “must have” books. (I) denotes introductory, (IA) denotes advanced introductory, i.e. the text is self-contained but it would be very helpful to ...


1

'Mathematical Physics' by Kusse and Westwig is just the thing you need. The fifth chapter is devoted to the Dirac-delta function. The book is fairly easy to understand and provides the proofs of the theorems that are stated in Arfken-Weber. After having read this, you can read the appendices I and II in Cohen-Tannoudji (Quantum Mechanics) on Fourier ...


5

The first thing that must be said is that the question is not really specific enough: Applications to what exactly are you looking for? To me, a book on algebraic geometry and mirror symmetry, and how it relates to mirror symmetry as physicists know it, is very relevant and interesting. However, I have the feeling that this is not exactly what you're looking ...


2

For online sources, there are some good introductions to special relativity here and here. For a print book An Illustrated Guide to Relativity seems like a good intro. Another good one is Spacetime Physics by Wheeler and Taylor, which I think for the most part just requires algebra though there may be some sections/problems that use some basic calculus. ...


-2

It's not uncommon for high school physics course to have a unit on Special Relativity so the easiest place to start might just be the relativity chapter in your physics text. One of the beauties of Special Relativity is that you can go a long with math no more complicated that you would cover in high school. General Relativity, which deals Gravitation and ...


0

Apart from reading books about celestial mechanics, may I suggest an incredible computer game, called Kerbal Space Program? It is incredibly fun to use your knowledge of physics to build stuff in space -- and in process you develop your intuitions and skills around the subject enormously. As XKCD puts it (and, currently working at NASA, I can confirm): ...


0

In three months you can study a lot of material. You can find a good calculus book and you can find out come good calculus books in the website goodreads.com(it contains reviews by users). Then you can re-study the material that you covered in your last year but not in the traditional sense. You must just try to solve a lot of difficult exercises(i take for ...



Top 50 recent answers are included