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Introduction to Plasma Physics by Francis Chen is probably one of the best sources for introductory plasma physics, despite being slightly dated (publication date of 1995) and using CGS units. It covers, among other things, particle motions in E&M fields plasmas as fluids (e.g., MHD) plasmas as particles (kinetic theory) controlled fusion As a ...


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As far as I understood from my so far cursory look into a living review article by Poisson, Pound and Vega on The Motion of Point Particles in Curved Spacetime, it's a bit messy. But I think if you manage to go through GR, this should be manageable, as well. It will probably help if you've dealt with Green's functions before and even better if you've seen ...


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I would suggest one of the (standard) books (though somehow old) on QFT in curved spacetime, Quantum Fields in Curved Space (Birrel & Davies) Relates to path integral formalism, and covers a lot of topics in QFT on curved spacetime Quantum Field Theory in Curved Spacetime (Parker & Toms) Uses DeWitt notation, a lot based on effective action ...


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Rather than a book, consider the Susskind Physics lectures made available on Youtube as well as Stanford on iTunes via iTunes-University. You want to watch the latest version of the course lectures on Classical Mechanics. After a small bit of introductory material, Susskind gets right into the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian approach to mechanics using a simple ...


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There is a new book called Physics From Symmetry which is written specifically for physicists and includes a long, very illustrative introduction to group theory. I especially liked that here concepts like representation or Lie algebra aren't only defined, but motivated and explained in terms that physicists understand. Plus no concepts are introduced which ...


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Physics from Symmetry is a book that explains all group theoretical concepts needed to understand the foundations of QFT in great detail and is written specifically for physicists. It's not very technical, but it's great if you want to understand quickly what concepts are really important for modern physics and why. For example, it explains why things ...


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There is a great introduction called "This is How Quantum Field Theory Works" which, I think, is exactly what you are looking for. All essential concepts are introduced and the basic idea how one gets from the fundamental equations to cross sections, i.e. quantities that can be measured in experiments is sketched.


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The energy balance is still the same in higher dimensions. You have that for a given control volume (rate of energy in) - (rate of energy out) + (rate of energy generation from heat source) = (rate of accumulation). The Fourier equation in 3 dimensions is $$\frac{q}{A}=-k \nabla T$$ where the derivative has been replaced with a gradient. Your convection ...


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Michael Faraday by L. Pearce Williams. Lots of biographical information but also detailed explications of his work referencing his published papers and diary. No math though, since Faraday wasn't a mathematician, but he was a great experimentalist!


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There is a derivation in Fetter and Walecka, as well as another treatment in Sakurai. I haven't looked at these in a while and they may or may not provide the mental satisfaction you are looking for, but it is worth looking at these two treatments at any rate.


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In chemist's terms you are looking for the ionization energy of the molecule. I imagine most standard quantum chemistry programs should be able to calculate this. If you have access, try out Gaussian. Otherwise Orca is a great quantum chemistry binary that is freely available. Both resources have great manuals.


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I have to suggest Barron's AP Physics C supplemented by some lectures from Professor Walter Lewin. Though designed as a supplement, the Barron books are fairly good at getting you right to the heart of the physics, complete with proofs when appropriate. It's also got a great set of practice problems.


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When I was in high school about 7 years ago, I taught myself a lot of what was necessary to get a 5 on both the AP Physics B and C exams through Dr. James Mooney's AP test preparation books. I would recommend these for learning physics at the high school level, especially if you are trying to learn quickly and well in preparation for the AP test. These ...


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My recommendations are: For Mechanics, Mathematical Methods of Classical Mechanics, by Arnold. For Electromagnetism, Modern Electrodynamics, Zangwill. For Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Physics, Le Bellac, or, at an easier level, Introduction to quantum mechanics, Griffiths. For General Relativity, General Relativity, Wald. This should give you a (good) ...


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There are a lot of review articles and books on these topics. But most of them require some knowledge of basic General Relativity and QFT. For Black hole thermodynamics I found the reviews by Jacobson and Ross very useful. On EE from vondensed matter (QFT) point of view there are papers by Cardy and others. But for those you need CFT background. Here is a ...


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One of the first complete study was performed by Obukhov in 1949 with his famous paper The structure of the temperature field in a turbulent flow. You can find it here [link] (This is a PDF file, you can check by searching the report title on Google). It is a nice thing to know. A complete review was written by Warhaft in the Annual Review of Fluid ...



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