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An excellent and clear review of String Field Theory may be found in the paper "Analytical Solutions of Open String Field Theory" by Ehud Fuchs and Michael Kroyter: hep-th/0807.4722. It discusses the CFT and the Oscillator Formalism for covariant string field theory and presents the Schnabl solutions. There is also a detailed discussion of the Sen ...


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After a long discussion with "curiousone" I would like to like to share the relevant points of our discussion (hopefully I will do them justice) and some extra bits I added after thinking it over First Law of thermodynamics While the equation $$TdS = k_b T \ln N dN + dU -PdV $$ is quite general to any system where particle number is not conserved. We ...


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This could be probably the closest one that I know: Data Analysis in High Energy Physics: A Practical Guide to Statistical Methods Olaf Behnke (Editor), Kevin Kroninger (Editor), Gregory Schott (Editor), Thomas Schorner-Sadenius (Editor) ISBN: 978-3-527-41058-3 http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-3527410589.html Especially Chapter 11 is ...


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You may want to refer to Jackson's 'Classical Electrodynamics' for several examples of solutions using Green functions. I also found chapter 7 of 'Mathematics for classical and quantum physics' by Byron and Fuller quite helpful. Its title itself is 'Green functions'.


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I would highly recommend the two seminal papers by E. T. Jaynes, http://journals.aps.org/pr/abstract/10.1103/PhysRev.106.620 and, http://journals.aps.org/pr/abstract/10.1103/PhysRev.108.171 Also check out the book by E. T. Jaynes, which has a focus on the foundations in probability but is rather light on applications in physics: ...


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While this may not be an objective answer, I personally like G4Beamline. They have plenty of built in materials and have all the particles in the PDG. Further, it's particularly easy to use and gives a nice graphical output (as well as numerical).


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Since this has become a community wiki... I think that the following two references (authors mentioned below) are among the standard recommendations for thermal field theory: Kapusta & Gale Le Bellac If I recall correctly, the former uses the imaginary-time formalism while the latter also has a treatment of the real-time formalism.


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I am recent graduated physicist. Assuming that you are looking for rigorous learning instead of just popular science, I would like to recommend a few books to get started in this amazing field of knowledge. Before you learn some hard Calculus, you can read this books: Physics for Scientist and Engineers. Tipler & Mosca. This books are the easiest ...


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Can't go wrong by starting with Griffiths. EDIT for clarity: Griffith's QM assumes very little math background, which is usually the case for beginners. I personally learned much more in the first chapter of Shankar than I did in Griffiths, but my linear algebra was very fresh. Griffiths starts by solving PDEs and it becomes evident that QM is messy this ...


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Did you had a look at this one KALUZA-KLEIN SUPERGRAVITY ? (and references therein)


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opinion based question, so it may be closed. The author Vincent (family name) has a very good introduction to group theory for molecules. I like this book as it has questions for you to answer as you go along so you really learn it as you read. If you are interested in solid state then you will have to go further to space groups with another text - this ...


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In the Schrodinger equation time is treated like a parameter. But there is no reason to think it has to be treated this way and there are attempts to put clock times on a more physical footing in quantum mechanics, especially in quantum gravity, e.g. http://arxiv.org/abs/gr-qc/9303020. There are various problems associated with understanding relativity and ...


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If it is still of interest, next to all the excellent suggestions above there is a book from 2013 which I found rather helpful as it makes some neat observations I could not find in other texts: Nonequilibrium Many-Body Theory of Quantum Systems - Stefanucci and Leeuwen


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For the theoretical background with an occasional nod to experiments, my bible is "Optical Coherence and Quantum Optics" by Mandel and Wolf. This book is both a text book and a reference for researchers. It covers the basics of random signals, quantum mechanics, the quantum theory of radiation, quantum optics, a bit of nonlinear optics, a bit of laser ...



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