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1

You don't say at what level you are studying this. Before you get stuck into the intricacies of exotic neutron star equations of state you need a good grounding in statistical mechanics and nuclear physics. A good place to start is the first few chapters of Shapiro & Teukolsky; "White Dwarfs, Neutron Stars and Black Holes" ...


2

here some literature on compact stars and equation of states: Classic book by Norman Glendenning http://www.amazon.de/Compact-Stars-Relativity-Astronomy-Astrophysics/dp/0387989773 Free lecture notes on arXiv http://arxiv.org/abs/1001.3294 http://www.amazon.de/Neutron-Stars-Equation-Structure-Astrophysics/dp/0387335439 These are the sources I used to ...


1

I created this site early in 2014: SpecialRelativity.net The site was built specifically for people who aren't keen on math.


0

i would like to provide another answer (despite my comments on top or complementary to them) i would propose to use a historical account of the evolution of the concepts and ideas/methods in physics from Newtonian mechanics to Relativistic mechanics, including the specific problems that arised (this provides two things: 1. a perspective on the methods and ...


1

I have used: "Relativity: A very short introduction"; Russell Stannard, OUP, to teach relativity to (interested) members of the general public, with some success. http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199236220.do It really is very short - only 128 pages, but covers the main ideas of both Special and General Relativity. I find the explanations very clear. ...


2

What makes water boil/evaporate is the thermodynamic concept derived from the first and second law of thermodynamics. You can read this article to find out the derivation from entropy to the Clapyeron equation. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clausius%E2%80%93Clapeyron_relation#Derivation_from_state_postulate $$\frac{\mathrm{d} P}{\mathrm{d} T} = \frac ...


0

Fulvio Melia's Electrodynamics. My graduate course on E&M used this text as a basis for the lectures (subsequently changed to the aforementioned Jackson). This book is very short (246 pages as compared to say Griffiths at 624 pages!), but covers all the relevant topics of E&M (Electrostatics, Magnetostatics, etc) before smoothly transitioning into ...


3

W. K. H. Panofsky and M. Phillips, Classical electricity and magnetism, Addison Wesley, 2nd ed., 1962 Especially the first 14 chapters are very enjoyable yet carefully written study text about both basic and more advanced topics in macroscopic EM theory (including discussion of EM energy from more experimental angle than is usual and of density of force ...


4

Besides Purcell I really like Feynman Vol. II. I finally could understand magnetic materials and electromagnets. (Warning, Feynman uses his own notation for B,H and M.) The lectures are available online and for free, as the New Millenium Edition, at http://www.feynmanlectures.caltech.edu/, in a nice re-mastered edition with re-drawn ...


8

Purcell is a good non-Griffiths option. I would judge the completeness of the material between Griffiths and Jackson, but with an intuitive level of understanding close to Griffiths. I used it to study for graduate qual exams when Jackson was making me feel particularly obtuse. Some positives: Touches more ideas than Griffiths Uses some real-world ...


12

D.J. Griffith's Introduction to Electrodynamics must be mentioned. To my knowledge this text is ubiquitous in junior-level E&M courses. The writing is extremely friendly and is excellent for self-study. The author frequently tells you what he is doing and provides motivation, unlike the ubiquitous graduate-level text by Jackson. Equations often use a ...


2

Jackson's classical electrodynamics is very complete, and often seen as the reference on CED. But I also like Rohrlich's classical charged particles that, as the title suggests, puts more emphasis on the subject of particles interacting with EM fields.


0

Nakahara's Geometry, Topology and Physics has two chapters covering Fiber Bundles up to Connections on Fiber Bundles with a few applications in Gauge theories. If it is your first time learning Fiber Bundles i would recommend this books, it's rigorous and has a lot of physics-motivated examples.


1

Griffiths has a quite good book, Introduction to Elementary Particles. The last chapter (I believe only in the revised edition) is all about gauge theories and culminates in the Higgs mechanism. This book can be read with just a bit of E&M, though a good deal of quantum mechanics will make the reading much quicker. Many of the specific examples can be ...


7

I'll write here a list of my personal favorites plus some commonly used books. I wouldn't be surprised if your teacher chose either one of the books below as a textbook: i) Mechanics, the first volume of the Landau course on Theoretical Physics; ii) Goldstein's book "Classical Mechanics"; iii) Taylor's book "Classical Mechanics"; iv) Marion's book ...


0

John Baez has freely available book based on a series of internet articles articles. I is very readable and definitely starts from scratch.


3

I think I good book for that may be C. J. Isham's Modern Differential Geometry for Physicists. I haven't gotten to the chapter of fiber bundles, but what I've read seems to be quite rigorous. And as it is written for physicists, I think it could please your needs.


0

My suggestion would be to start with the ADM formalism. The details of the Kaluza-Klein seperation will be a little different, because they're foliating on a timelike fiber, and thus, your "special" dimension is spacelike, but the idea is essentially the same -- the lapse function is your dilaton field, and the shift is your vector potential. I'm sure that ...


0

I found some interesting papers for $N=2$ by Yuji Tachikawa (N-2 supersymmetric dynamcis for dummies, recently revised to N=2 supersymmetric dynamics for pedestrian : arXiv 1312.2684v2) and some advanced supersymmetric textbook contains extended supersymmetry well. Also these topics are related with Seiberg-witten theory, review papers on Seiberg-witten ...


0

Quantum Computing since Democritus was useful to me, coming from a similar background. It first observes that one only needs a few principles of QM to think about quantum computation, and then launches into the complexity theory underlying the abilities of theoretical quantum computers.



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