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You can also have a look in Landau and Lifshitz (Quantum Mechanics - Non-relativistic Theory, where in ยง39. The secular equation, degenerate perturbation theory is treated, then there is specifically to your question Problem 2.: "Derive the formulae for the correction to the eigenfunctions in the first approximation and to the eigenvalues in the second ...


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Most papers on quantum mechanics don't explain issues like interpretation clearly and non-locality clearly. The most notable exceptions to this are David Deutsch and to a lesser extent David Wallace. "The Fabric of Reality" by David Deutsch is a popular book that explains quantum mechanics, see especially chapter 2. See also "The Beginning of Infinity" by ...


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Lectures on Quantum Theory: Mathematical and Structural Foundations by Chris Isham is a thin, easy to read book. The first 6 or so chapters are a simple introduction to quantum mechanics, but from about chapter 7 or 8 he goes into the Quantum Measurement problem and various interpretations and their associated difficulties. He also discusses Bell's Theorem, ...


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Some note-worthy index pages for spectal data: XPS data for all elements: in a periodic table format Quantitative Infrared Database THz Spectral Database X-ray properties of elements (also in a periodic table format)


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In addition to Weinberg's fantastic book which does cover things pretty well, a good companion book is "Relativistic Cosmology" by Ellis, Maartens and Maccallum, which covers a lot of stuff Weinberg doesn't and is in general a good book on Cosmology. Aside from the standard introduction to FLRW cosmology, inflation, thermodynamics etc, it covers an ...


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I just discovered: opticalraytracer From the manual: OpticalRayTracer is a free (GPL) cross-platform application that analyzes systems of lenses and mirrors. It uses optical principles and a virtual optical bench to predict the behavior of many kinds of ordinary and exotic lens types as well as flat and curved mirrors. OpticalRayTracer ...


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If you are interested in molecules then The nist webbook has a huge store of information ---- see http://webbook.nist.gov (NB no pay wall) You can search pretty easily and get mass spectra, heats of formation and some information about IR and UV/Vis spectra as well To quote from their front page there are.... Thermochemical data for over 7000 ...


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The service authorea.com has a very good built in system to search for citations across many disciplines. This is what your particular example returns: If instead of using the full line presented by the OP with all the information on the article (ie: Zhou H J and Wang C 2012 J. Stat. Phys. 148 513-547) you give this service the smaller line: J. Stat. ...


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The line J. Stat. Phys. 148 513-547 contains all the information needed to locate the article. It appeared in the Journal for Statistical Physics, issue 148 on pages 513-517. In fact, if you just type the stuff in my quote into Google, the third hit (at least on my search) is a .pdf version of the paper.


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Most physics publications nowadays (at least in my experience) include a link to the paper's DOI, which is the easiest way to get to the reference's abstract page. If I am reading a printed-out paper and care about the references, I'll usually have the references section in a browser window and use that to go to each reference. Absent that, the best bet is ...


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Physics papers and books from 18th and 19th century by Kelvin, Rayleigh and J.J. Thomson and other physicists who invented lot of physics while thinking about everyday phenomena. You can find them on Internet Archive as their collected papers/works.


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Frank Wilczek will edit The Princeton Companion to Physics, but unfortunately the anticipated publication date is in 2018.


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I like Bill Gibbs' book Computation In Modern Physics for a couple of reasons (aside from having taken the course from the author): After introducing basic tools (difference approximations to differential equations, numeric quadratures (i.e. integrals), and eigenvalue problems in a matrix form) it moves right on to problems of interest to me. The examples ...


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The "Problem book in relativity and gravitation" is free online here -- legally, from the authors. It's got a pretty broad variety of questions, along with solutions. It is a little on the old side, but many of the problems are just as relevant today. But I don't think there's much that can compare to MTW.


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I would get Wald. That's the standard text for the field. It has a small number of problems, but they're very good. I would recommend downloading homework problems from other schools, for example MIT opencourseware. It seems to be the trend that for GR the most popular textbooks are not problem-heavy. One neat book that is dedicated to problems is the ...


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Until today, there is little review literature about AdS/CFT given how young the subject is. This might change soon, when the book of Erdmenger and Ammon apprears. Until then, this review of Sean Hartnoll is a great reference with much focus on the applications of charged black hole solutions for boundary condensed matter systems. In this review, one can ...


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WSxM is free and does this sort of statistics using the "flood" tool.



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