New answers tagged

1

Thanu Padmabhan's 'Gravitation: Foundation and Frontiers' is good both for General relativity and tetrad formalism. Supergravity by Daniel Z Freedman and Antoine Van Proeyen has two chapters on differential geometry with first and second order formulations of general relativity. This is used to teach how to work with tetrads, also in conjunction with ...


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I strongly recommend that you look into book "General Relativity" by Wald if you havent yet. It uses tetrads and spinors only once in a while but it is one of the best textbooks I used.


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For GR, Straumann's General Relativity with Applications for Astrophysics uses the local tetrad approach extensively, but not exclusively. I seem to recall Chandrashekhar's The Mathematical Theory of Black Holes and this book also uses tetrads at places (the latter one also null-tetrads and spinors). For particle physics, I second "Quantum Field Theory in a ...


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You don't list Q.M, but just in case on your way to particle physics: Q.M. Exercises and applications: Squires and another book by Tamvakis, both called "Problems and Solutions in Q.M". Although my questions sure don't display it, I learned a lot from both of these. Squires is particularly good, with a summary and longer answers for the basic aspects of ...


3

This depends largely on what apparatus your school already has. But every school should have a good diffraction grating and a large white screen. You can then do a diffraction experiment and take measurements on the screen. Then using the formula $d \ sin \theta =n \lambda$, you can get wavelengths. See http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/phyopt/...


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Google mathematical methods in the physical sciences pdf and you will be able to download an ebook by Mary Boas, which was written for people like yourself. As Jacob says above, calculus is a must learn, and lots of websites give you examples of different levels of calculus problems. Conceptually, a good textbook is Halliday and Resnicks Physics, which sets ...


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Beautiful (in my opinion) source in which higgs mechanism nature of superconducting phenomena is discussed, is Steven Weinberg's QFT Vol. 2, sec. 21.6. Topological nature of superconucting vortices is discussed in this section. Also, there is general discussion on topological configurations in QFT, with theoretical minimum, in Chapter 23.


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One place you could look for a rather neat derivation (that I haven't really found elsewhere) is Lecture 38 and 39 from the series that Sidney Coleman gave at Harvard in 1976. The series is available online at the Harvard physics website. He says he learnt that method himself from Smorodinsky (Russian mathematician) at the Dubna conference (probably in the ...


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In CFT, we are interested in the continuum limit, where we can classify classes of models at their critical points. By means of the Jordan-Wigner transformation one can construct a fermion operator out of the spin operators of the usual 2D Ising model. Then, the continuum critical Ising model is described by a massless real fermion: $$ S=\frac 12\int d^2 z\...


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Lamarsh is a great textbook, but a little dated and out-of-print. You can usually pick up copies on E-Bay. The book currently used in many junior-level nuclear engineering courses is E. E. Lewis, "Fundamentals of Nuclear Engineering", Elsevier (2008). ISBN 978-0-12-370631-7


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This is a very good book which covers atomic spectra and Laser Physics, with good Physical intuition and fairly rigorous Mathematical proofs. https://www.amazon.com/Atomic-Physics-Oxford-Master-Optical/dp/0198506961


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The PhD. Thesis: Hannah Dunstan Noble, "Mueller Matrix Roots" gives a gentle introduction to the concepts and José J. Gil, "Characteristic Properties of Mueller Matrices", JOSA A, 17, pp328-334 derives necessary and sufficient conditions for a matrix to be a physical Mueller matrix. The situation is not quite as simple as you assume, although the ...


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As you are talking about a "Star map" and "current visible positions", I'll assume you are talking about a star map of the ${\sim} 5000$ stars visible to the naked eye. Most of those stars are within 1000 light years of he Earth. They have typical velocity dispersions with respect to the Earth of ${\sim} 10$ km/s, with the occasional rare star with a ...


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I suggest Group Theory in a Nutshell for Physicists by A. Zee


3

Disclaimer: i understand you didnt ask about gauge invariance but gauge invariance and vector potentials are connected and so ill discuss both in my answer below. Schwartz "quantum field theory and the standard model" has a good, albeit very brief, accessible discussion of the utility of gauge invariance, in particular the vector potential. Gauge ...


1

If you really want to learn Quantum Gravity it is never too late to introduce yourself to General Relativity as well as Quantum Field Theory. First one is crucial for understanding Quantum Gravity because it is based on both QM and GR. So for more advanced studying I recommend this book http://www.cpt.univ-mrs.fr/~rovelli/book.pdf


2

I wish someone had recommended Paul Renteln's Manifolds, Tensors, and Forms. An Introduction for Mathematicians and Physicists. Unlike many mathematically inclined differential geometry textbooks, it works with an indefinite metric the whole way through. Chapters one and two aren't very necessary and primarily form a review of linear algebra. It also ...


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I learnt from Schutz: Geometrical Methods of Mathematical Physics, combined Choquet-Bruhat, DeWitt-Morette (& I think one other): Analysis, Manifolds and Physics, and I found it a good combination. GMoMP is mildly rigorous, and covers most of the material you need to get a pretty good handle on GR. AMaP is a much more serious approach to a larger ...


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Doesn't Sean Carroll's book give recommendations? It has an extensive bibliography, and recommends Schutz among others. The Preface explains what pre-requisites are useful, and that "building a mathematical framework is the goal" of the early chapters (2 Curvature, 3 Manifolds). It contains 8 mathematical appendices. So you are unlikely to need any ...


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I think you are asking far too much of one book, and your requirements are somewhat contradictory. Books for the layman are not usually "in-depth." It is up to you to define what you consider to be "major" and what topics you would like to read about. If you do not do so, we can only guess. Books on the detailed history of physics usually specialise in ...


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One book I'd definitely recommend is John Gribbin's The Scientists. While it is a little more biographical, it does include the trial and error, the buildup, etc., as well as the stories of quite a few more obscure scientists that contributed way more than you'd think. His book is also in a narrative format, not an encyclopedic format. John Gribbin's book ...


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The question is always what is a 'decent' level... There are many books that appear to deal with semiconductor device physics, but generally deal more with semiconductor technology. I have a number of those gathering dust on my shelf. The one that has stood the test of time since my graduate device physics course is S.M. Sze's Physics of Semiconductor ...


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You can try Modern Problems in Classical Electrodynamics by Charles Brau. I think it is relatively clear in this book. At least I hope you can find the end-results in Zangwill or Brau. Then you should after trying be able to get there yourself. Start from the expression for the electric potential. In the integral there is a $\frac{1}{|\bar{r}-\bar{r}'|}$....



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