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I don't think you can get much better than the physical books Susskind and Hrabovsky's "The Theoretical Minimum". If the words "hamiltonian" and "lagrangian" sound scary to you, then you should pick up both the book "What you need to know to start doing physics" and the book "Quantum Mechanics: The Theoretical Minimum". The math isn't dumbed down, but is ...


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I think what you might be looking for is Quantum Physics by Stephen Gasiorowicz This is what I used for my 2nd year undergraduate course in QM (now taught in the 1st year I believe) It covers most basic quantum physics and then develops to operator theory and perturbation theory etc.


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As far as cosmology is concerned, the book which I consider to be THE best for a mathematical treatment of cosmology, is AK Raychaudhuri's "General relativity, astrophysics, and cosmology". It is excellently presented, Raychudhuri doesn't shy away from the math, and the old-school style makes it all the more elegant. So, I would STRONGLY recommend it. I ...


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Just a quick preliminary answer, I will fix it later. The connection to general relativity is a change of variables in which the metric is replaced by a "spin connection" and a "frame field". These quantities can then be arranged in a new matrix, so the metric field has been rewritten as a different matrix-valued field, and the transformations ...


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Really a simple google search should suit your desires... Anyway, throughout my highschool physics courses i used Physics Classroom which gives you a good insight into it all. Also Leonard Susskind has a playlist of his lectures on classic mechanics available on YouTube, seeing i don't think you would go any further than classic mechanics seeing you would ...


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It all depends on how deep down the rabbit hole you want to go. If you want to have a survey of some of the most interesting concepts that is accessible and, most importantly, short, the Feynman Lectures on Physics are a great place to start. From there you can decide what you want to learn in more depth.


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For the most part, you are right. Physics is tough, and in many ways high school physics is the hardest because it is the first introduction to a new and difficult way of thinking. Furthermore, teachers are under pressure to complete the curriculum. And there's always the possibility that the teacher him/herself does not have a firm grasp of the subject. ...


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sorry to hear that things are frustrating. I don't think you need the Huygen principle for the double slit experiment. Take a look at the diagram below... The diagram shows two rays from a double slit experiment. The path lengths are slightly different from the two slits. In one case the waves arrive in phase and you get the bright fringe - constructive ...


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If you have not seen it yet, conformal bootstrap in $1+1$ is extremely powerful, and in many cases essentially determine the whole theory. Everything is done analytically. Recent works of higher-dimensional generalizations share many basic features with the $1+1$ version, so it seems not a bad idea to start from there.


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Start with the lecture notes at the top of Slava Rychkov's blog, http://sites.google.com/site/slavarychkov/home


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Hook and Hall is probably my personal favourite as it is very clear and concise without a lot of fuss. For a totally different style to the classics maybe try "The Oxford Solid State Basics". The lecture notes on which this book was based are available (in part) online (google steve simon solid state lecture notes and you should get there without much ...


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There would be a big difference between documenting the advance of truly fundamental physics, and documenting the advance of every investigation, discovery and idea which might count as physics. The fundamental advances are documented in places like encyclopedias, textbooks, and the list of Nobel Prize winners. Perhaps the closest thing to a central, ...


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A small note on the definition. It should be $$ M(S) := \sqrt{ \frac{\text{Area}(S)}{16 \pi}} \left(1- \frac 1 {16 \pi}\int_S \theta^-\theta^+ d_{\sigma_S}\right), $$ where $\theta^\pm$ are the divergences along the two null directions. It is equal to what you have written if the 2-surface $S$ lies in a space-like 3D submanifold with vanishing extrinsic ...


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E. T. Jaynes: Probability Theory: The Logic of Science http://omega.albany.edu:8008/JaynesBook.html The book has also printed form. Jaynes also published readable and revealing papers on probability, statistical physics and other physics. Here you can find them: http://bayes.wustl.edu/etj/node1.html


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The linked website from 1995 or 2005 is correct in that it says that "interlocking asperities" is not the universal explanation that it was once naively hoped to be (as in Coulomb's model of friction). Micro-scale asperity interlocking seems to be rare for typical surfaces that are sliding because, for example, sliding often tends to smooth the highest ...


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Here's a list of quantum computer simulators, categorized by the programming language in which they were written: http://www.quantiki.org/wiki/List_of_QC_simulators Specifically, http://www.davyw.com/quantum/ allows the full simulation of up to 9 qubits.


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They are listed in here catalogue of spacetimes


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As a beginner for working on relevant topics, I just write few words about your question. I hope it helps you up. Localization Principle has been great role in computing superconformal index also it gives the exact calculation in susy gauge theories. From some excellent works by Pestun, Kapustin, Willet and so on(about a decade ago?), many researcher now ...


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You can just write down $$\Gamma^i{}_{k\ell}=\tfrac{1}{2}\,g^{im} \left(\partial_{x^\ell}g_{mk} + \partial_{x^k} g_{m\ell} - \partial_{x^m} g_{k\ell} \right)$$ in Mathematica. The example blow is for the Schwarzschild metric. Here is the code. (You might have to patch the parts lost by my excessive use of display style.)


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Frolov's Black hole Physics (Google Books link) has an entire chapter on the Kerr metric, but states at the beginning of that chapter, Mathematical properties of the Kerr metric and its generalization with electric charge included (the Kerr-Newman metric) are discussed in Appendix D. Appendix D does include Christoffel symbols of the Kerr-Newman metric ...


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Not a definite answer to your question, sorry, but if you absolutely can't find it on G. (or you lack the patience to dig through arxiv.org or G. for a lucky reference), one alternative that works for me when I just want confirmation is to visit amazon, stick in say "General Relativity" books and use their "look inside the book" feature. a screenshot of ...


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A classical is Bransden, Joachain - Physics of Atoms and Molecules, a one-thousand tome covering a lot of basic material. Another good book is Atkins, Friedmann - Molecular quantum mechanics. This one is at a slightly lower level than Bransden, and also contains reviews of basic concepts of quantum mechanics (it's pretty much self-contained). It has a lot ...


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Some good books on atomic physics are: The classic "Atomic physics" by Max born. Atomic Physics by J Foot. The Feynman's lectures volumes. Introductory Nuclear Physics by K S Krane. Moreover there is a series of "very short introductions" books, those are good too for a pre insight on a subject of interest.


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The method I will present here is very general and by training this is the first that comes to my mind. There might be a simpler one though. The idea is to consider another function $G(\Gamma) \equiv e^{-g F(\Gamma)}$ with $g > 0$ and $F(\Gamma) = a \sum_i n_i$. The sum I want to compute is now $S_g \equiv \sum_{\Gamma} G(\Gamma)$. This sum is actually ...



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