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I've only really done antennas in undergrad, and the most we really looked at was phased arrays of half wavelength antennas and looking at the resulting field distribution far from the source, so take what I say with a grain of salt. One interesting thing to look at might be genetic optimization processes for antenna design. I believe that there has been ...


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A very good book along the lines you seem to want is Gallavotti's Statistical Mechanics - A Short Treatise, which can be downloaded from here. He covers many of the classical topics, with a detailed discussion of foundational issues, the role of ergodicity/mixing, etc. From a very different point of view, with a colleague, we are writing a mathematically ...


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My personal favorite is "Mathematical Foundations Of Statistical Mechanics" by A. I. Khinchin (a mathematician) and G. Gamow. The content remains mathematically rigorous throughout, but nonetheless very readable. In chapter two, both the Liouville and Birkhoff theorems are derived, followed up by a long discussion on metric decomposability of phase space and ...


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I would recommend for the concepts & intuitions for Newtonian Mechanics: $\bullet$ Newtonian Mechanics: Introductory M.I.T. Physics series by A.P.French: Newtonian Mechanics by A.P. French, retd. MIT physics professor, is really as worthy as gold to have. It is designed to be a more or less self-contained introduction to Newtonian mechanics. Students ...


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I suggest the American Journal of Physics as a good reference for undergraduates. The readership is Physics teachers so usually covers the topics that are of interest to students and the parts of a research subject that are of most interest to students. Plus it tries to make thing accessible to people that aren't in the specific subfield (in case they are ...


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String Theory volumes 1 & 2 by Joe Polchinski are very recommendable with many exercises. See also: Barton Zwiebach: A First Course in String Theory and (!): String Theory and M-Theory: A Modern Introduction, by: J. Schwarz, K. Becker and M. Becker, with many exercises. Regards. Pascal Kwanten


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A book for self study to get you from introductory QM to elementary is Claude Cohen-Tannoudji's Quantum mechanics textbook which is in two volumes. It has a very high price but it deserves it. It has all the glory details inside! (Shankar's book is also great and is on the same level and also covers path integrals. Griffiths' is only introductory, although ...


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I will add another recommendation: CP2K. It is not written C/C++, it is written in Fortran; this might require a bit of time to adapt if you want to actually modify the code and have not encountered Fortran before. However, CP2K can do both quantum and classical mechanics simulations, and it can scale well. For example, a presentation by Jürg Hutter from ...


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then the created pions will be at rest correct? Well, they will be at rest in the Center of Momentum frame. But that is not the frame of reference that your problem is stated in. Momentum is conserved, which tells you that you have written the pion four-vectors incorrectly.


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I highly recommend Richard D. Mattuck A Guide to Feynman Diagrams in the Many-Body Problem. You can read some pages here. It's a very surface level introduction, but the first 3 or so chapters are presented at what he calls a "kindergarten" level so you shouldn't have any problems understanding it. However, the last part is most definitely not ...


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There are many resources on many-body Green's functions (propagators) both on-line and in print. You may want to search "quantum field methods in many-particle systems" or "quantum field methods for condensed matter systems" or variations thereof. In any case, I personally recommend the oldie-but-goodie book by Fetter and Walecka, Quantum Theory of ...


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You can check The Best Cheap Budget Telescopes Under $200; this presents the latest list of all affordable telescopes that are competent for beginners. Also you can check The cheap telescopes of 2014. Remember always that though magnification is good, but you must need to have a good apparture in your device & for that I prefer Newtonian telescopes or in ...


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My absolute favorite book on the subject is the one that we used in our Gas Dynamics class: Introduction to Physical Gas Dynamics by Vincenti and Kruger. I had never had an introduction to statistical mechanics prior to this book and it does a great job developing the requirements as they are needed and providing motivation for the path it takes. I also ...


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Rickman (2014) reviews the relationship between the Oort cloud and long period comets, but does touch on the origins of the Oort cloud. The review of Jewitt (2010) deals with the Oort cloud, Kuiper belt and comets (basically, icy bodies in the solar system), highlighting what we don't know. The Annual Reviews articles by Mumma & Charnley (2011) and by ...


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I found an answer myself and I would like to share it via this answer. The process of arriving to this Hamiltonian is described in details in the following book: G.L. Bir, G.E. Pikus "Symmetry and strain-induced effects in semiconductors" The process is described in chapter 15 below the topic "Perturbation theory for the degenerate case" The approach the ...


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I'll elaborate on the things mentioned in the comments. That being said, this will refer mostly to very specific foliations and not much of a general theory. First, since manifolds in GR have a timelike and a spacelike component, it's always worth keeping track of those. Then foliations arise very naturally trying to see whether or not there is a reasonable ...


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The key idea for the positive mass theorem is that asymptotically flat spacetime always has non-negative energy. Furthermore, of all spacetime which are asymptotically flat, empty Minkowski space is the only one which has zero energy. This is an important result because it tells us that spacetimes such as Minkowski are inherently stable. Now, the proof of ...


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The term to look for is Coulomb wave. These wavefunctions are well explained in the corresponding Wikipedia article. Depending on your mathematical background, you should be ready for a bit of a formula jolt, as these wavefunctions rely very intimately on the confluent hypergeometric function. If you want the short of it, then I can tell you that the ...


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I would like to suggest the book I am folfollowing presently-NCERT 11th Grade CChemsitry.It explains in an intuitive and interesting way the basics of QM. It is free for download on ncert.nic.in MIT opencourseware provides neat lectures. Ted-ed is amazing too (but I prefer MIT ocw). For mathematics-you can get great content on Khanacademy.org Regards,do ...


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Some algebraic geometry with the main purpose of understanding D-branes in the context of mirror symmetry is reviewed in Paul Aspinwall's 'D-branes on Calabi-Yau manifolds' (http://arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/0403166). I have not begun reading it thoroughly myself, but it seems accessible to physicists, at least those with the basic math background for string ...



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