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2

In my opinion, Purcell is actually a mathematical step down from Griffiths, and certainly covers fewer topics than it. It's great for intuition-building (and every serious physicist should own it), but if rigor is what you're after, it's not the best choice. Jackson and Landau & Lifshitz are going to be the standard answers here. Another option, and ...


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You might be interested to have a look at the the site The Universe in Problems. This is a community maintained web site, so the problems are very variable in style and difficulty. The downside of this is that many of the problems will not suit your current level of expertise, but on the other hand the upside is that there is bound to be some fraction of ...


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The only book that I know can help build you intuition is "Lectures on Quantum Mechanics" by Weinberg. Weinberg's book is used to give a course in Advanced QM. It should not be your first read on the subject. The book is quite enlightening because it sheds lights on details that most QM books jump over without explaining the intuition or at least the ...


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(i) Roger Shawyer Shawyer's output seems to be mostly available on emdrive.com. Among the theoretical explanations he provides there are A Note on the Principles of EmDrive force measurement Principle of Operation Theory paper None of these appear to be peer-reviewed. (ii) NWPU group Applying Method of Reference 2 to Effectively Calculating ...


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I found an article by E. J. Copeland, D. J. Mulryne, N. J. Nunes, M. Shaeri that explains this, it's called Super-inflation in Loop Quantum Cosmology. This is part of the answer I wrote most the equations come from this article unless I cite otherwise. According to Loop Quantum Cosmology, in super inflation a smaller number of e-folds are required. This is ...


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There are some excellent recommendations above, but the best introduction to classical thermodynamics I've found is the first 70 pages of J. S. Dugdale's Entropy and its Physical Meaning. He follows the historical development of the subject, including page long quotes from the likes of Fahrenheit, Joule and Carnot. He develops the idea of the Carnot engine, ...


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I'll give it a try: Jesse L. Silverberg, Matthew Bierbaum, James P. Sethna, and Itai Cohen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 228701 (2013): "Collective Motion of Humans in Mosh and Circle Pits at Heavy Metal Concerts". (I got the idea from a Sixty Symbols video.) http://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.228701 It's not written by someone famous ...


3

I'm going to be perverse and suggest Blas Cabrera's "First Results from a Superconductive Detector for Moving Magnetic Monopoles" (Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 1378 (1982).) Cabrera isn't a household name, of course, but this does have some advantages as a teaching paper: First, the experiment is dead simple to explain to students who know about EMFs and ...


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From the details I assume it needs to concern a specific experiment, rather than just some musings. In recent news, in Nature Chemestry, "Coulomb explosion during the early stages of the reaction of alkali metals with water" (online version) has the Mythbusters appeal. When combined with the you-tube lead-up to the formal experiments, it is quite ...


4

As noted in P. Weinberger's revisit of Louis de Broglie's 1924 doctoral thesis: De Broglie's contribution in the Philosophical Magazine from 1924 is fascinating from many standpoints: for its moderate use of mathematics, the close connection to Einstein's special theory of relativity, and of course for the proposal of matter waves. We revisit ...


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It seems to me Fermi's 1949 paper On the origin of the cosmic radiation (pdf copy link) is fairly accessible, requiring basic E&M and conservation of energy & momentum. The paper was written as a proposal for a mechanism to accelerate cosmic rays from thermal velocities to relativistic ones. The mechanism he proposes (based on Alfven waves) ...


35

If you want research-level physics papers about topics high school students can understand, your best bet might be to look to the past. Older papers are great fun to read, but with their archaic language and notation they're not always the most efficient way to learn. One famous exception is Einstein's 1905 classic On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies. ...


1

All these links are accessible at a non-mathematical level, and they are by recognized scientists (with the exception of the first link). (1) To start, see the "Simple English Wikipedia", which explains what the Higgs effect is, and the reason for the Higgs effect: http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Higgs_field. (2) The difference between the Higgs boson and ...


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You can refer to chap 9 of "An introduction to quantum field theory" of Peskin & Scroeder, which includes a detailed calculation of path integral using the original physical definition of path integral. After the brutal treatment, they will show you more modern treatment using generating functional.


1

Some of the mathematical aspects of the Liouville operator can be found in the second book by Reed and Simon, in section X.14 (it is not a comprehensive account, but it gives the basic ideas and proofs). In the notes at the end of chapter X, in the part dedicated to section X.14, there is also a quite extensive bibliography that may be useful.


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I forgot I had asked this a while back, but I thought I would provide an answer since I have many references now. I realize that when I first asked this question I may have sounded a bit naive and I hadn't put much time into searching for references. Anyway, here are some references (old) related to no-hair theorems. Older references: 1967, 1968, 1971, ...


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try this link. it basically works on the same principal as a prism, but is many times more effective.


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For anyone interested, I found a good document with all Feynman rules and different notations: http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.6213


2

I think that your teacher (?) asked you about thermal de Broglie wavelength, where $$\lambda_T \propto\frac{1}{\sqrt{T}}.$$ You get this expression when you express the momentum in $\lambda=h/p$ in in terms of kinetic energy and the kinetic energy itself in terms of the energy due to temperature. (The derivation is also in the wikipedia article...) Indeed, ...


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Try here for background into the derivation of the AdS/CFT correspondence and also this thesis for an excellent introduction to the correspondance with regards to symmetry breaking. Further to this, try these slides outlining the motivations and also providing a good reading list.


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I can recommend these lecture notes, which discuss many prerequisites for understanding the correspondence in a concise yet accessible way.


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Quantum Computation is mostly written in terms of quantum gates, which translates more directly to hardware implementation. It will probably be easy for you to understand it. Steps you need to take: Understand how to compute the quantum way: Know how bra-ket works, that's easy to learn. I highly recommend Quantum Computation by Nielsen and Chuang. Get to ...



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