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My references are very good reviews: Quantum inverse scattering and Algebraic Bethe Ansatz: Faddeev: How Algebraic Bethe Ansatz works for integrable model Kulish and Sklyanin: Quantum Spectral Transform Method. Recent Developments Takhtajan: Introduction to algebraic Bethe ansatz and the Books: Jimbo and Miwa: Algebraic Analysis of Solvable Lattice ...


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Well, I'd like to give a different perspective to the train of thought here. Geometric topology and its related fields are important in the study of elastic membranes and sheets and their d-dimensional variants. In particular, understanding topological transformations of membrane vesicles or sheets is a non-trivial and open problem. On a related note, the ...


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I learned my GR from Landau and Lifshitz Classical Theory of Fields, 2nd edition. Even at 402 (4th Edition) pages it is kind of breathless. The interesting thing about it is the first half is special relativity and electrodynamics which dovetails into the 2nd half which is GR. One has to persivere because it's terse but not too terse. Like Weinberg it has a ...


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As part of the sympy computer algebra system there are geometric (clifford) algebra modules. The latest can be found in my fork of sympy at https://github.com/brombo/sympy Their is a latex doc in the repository at sympy/doc/src/modules/galgebra/pdf/GA.pdf Various examples are in sympy/examples/galgebra (especially look at the latex examples). In the ...


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Theoretically, if a galaxy is far enough away and the universe ends or we become extinct, then it would never reach "us". Unless there is a distance that, once traveled, light dissipates to nothing, which seems unlikely, given ample time it will all reach "us" eventually.


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I have found that the review by Nayak et al. on topological quantum computation (http://arxiv.org/abs/0707.1889) to be helpful in getting acquainted with topological phases, Chern-Simons theory and many related issues. It is really a wonderful review and definitely should be on your reading list.


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Sometimes a brief notes is a better introduction than a whole book, because you directly go to some essential ideas (if the notes are good of course). Then, you can expand your knowledge later. Particularly, I liked some course notes by Raúl Toral, notes that I have found just by chance.


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Your question and this answer are really better suited to the Meta, and I suspect a moderator will be along some time soon to migrate them. But while your question is still here ... An intuitive understanding of GR is extraordinarily difficult to attain. I've been studying GR (as an interested amateur not a pro) for a decade and I still make naive errors ...


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The Particle Data Book, published by the Particle Data Group is probably the nearest to what you're asking for. The actual book is a massive tome costing a fortune. I'm not sure how much of and in what form it's online, but some intrepid Googling should find you most of what you want. As fqq points out the book is available from Phys. Rev. D vol. 86 Issue 1 ...



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