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I've been looking at this Java archive General Relativity (GR) Package written by Wolfgang Christian, Mario Belloni, and Anne Cox It includes a lot of simple programs about Newtonian mechanics, special relativity and general relativity, including the aforementioned GROrbits. It doesn't permit custom metrics - you are limited to Schwarzschild ...


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Stefano Bordoni's 2012 Taming Complexity (e-book from ResearchGate; review) is a good place to start.(Bordoni has a master's degree in physics and three PhDs, in the history of science, anthropology and epistemology of complexity, and philosophy.) Bordoni refers to Brush's 1986 The Kind of Motion We Call Heat: A History of the Kinetic Theory of Gases in ...


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I'm not completely sure what you want, but honestly the entirety of Spivak's Calculus on manifolds is devoted to exactly that. If you want something that feels familiar, you can simply find $\nabla$ in various coordinate systems in Wikipedia, but if you want a less coordinate-centric view then you're probably going to need to step outside of your comfort ...


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For particle/light motion in 2D space, my nomination would be GROrbits It's free and requires a JVM to run, there is also a web start version for the brave ;) Sorry but I've never found anything aimed at visualizing metrics or curvature (apart from plotting programs of course).


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A further investigation led me to the desired reference, which discusses this precise problem: Hard Superconductivity: Theory of the Motion of Abrikosov Flux Lines Work of Anderson and Kim, at Bell Labs, around 1964


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You can read the utterly fantastic Feynman Lectures on Physics which is free for online viewing at the link provided. I would also recommend Feynman's Tips on Physics: Reflections, Advice, Insights, Practice - A Problem-Solving Supplement to the Feynman Lectures on Physics. My University uses Giancoli as well as the textbook for introductory physics, but I ...


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I was thinking about building my virtual elastic bodies as systems of "nodes", each with a certain mass, interconnected by springs. You just described Finite Element Modeling - the cornerstone of mechanical engineering, and the method used for making sure that that bridge won't collapse when an 18 wheeler passes over it. This is an extremely well ...


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Introducing Quantum Theory: A graphic guide is a very good graphical book. It really provokes one to study more and more in this area. It uses the Pilot wave theory which is a negative point. Neverthless, the pictures are really breathetaking! Physicists here explain their contributions & the problems by themselves! Being jealous at the Solvay ...


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"The Feynman lectures" are an amazing gem for learning physics and are available online for free.


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Where should i start in physics? As I also mentioned as an answer to a similar question: http://physics.stackexchange.com/a/154425/4962 a great overview and understanding of physics, starting from scratch, can be achieved by studying topics in this order: Kinematics (motion) Dynamics (forces) Rotational kinematics and dynamics Collisions (momentum ...


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This is not a full answer to the question, but just to point out existing related studies. This kind of question was considered a lot in the context of Josephson junction, which is basically a superconducting ring but with a weak link (i.e. the junction), where intuitively vortices tunnel through the junction. The simplest model of such a system is just the ...


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Hook and Hall is probably my personal favourite as it is very clear and concise without a lot of fuss. For a totally different style to the classics maybe try "The Oxford Solid State Basics". The lecture notes on which this book was based are available (in part) online (google steve simon solid state lecture notes and you should get there without much ...


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Start with the lecture notes at the top of Slava Rychkov's blog, http://sites.google.com/site/slavarychkov/home


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If you have not seen it yet, conformal bootstrap in $1+1$ is extremely powerful, and in many cases essentially determine the whole theory. Everything is done analytically. Recent works of higher-dimensional generalizations share many basic features with the $1+1$ version, so it seems not a bad idea to start from there.


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Just a quick preliminary answer, I will fix it later. The connection to general relativity is a change of variables in which the metric is replaced by a "spin connection" and a "frame field". These quantities can then be arranged in a new matrix, so the metric field has been rewritten as a different matrix-valued field, and the transformations ...


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I second The Cartoon Guide to Physics by Larry Gonick, but I also have to add Einstein for Beginners by Joseph Schwartz. Those two books are probably the most responsible for getting me into my physics career. I'd also give a big nod to Thinking Physics: Understandable Practical Reality by Lewis Carroll Epstein. This is a phenomenal choice for excellent ...


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I would say that the Wikipedia page on curvilinear coordinates and the article Mathematical Physics Lessons - Gradient, Divergence and Curl in Curvilinear Coordinates by James Foadi are enough to understand what is going on.


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There is a book "Exact Solutions of Einstein’s Field Equations" by Hans Stephani, Dietrich Kramer, Malcolm MacCallum, Cornelius Hoenselaers and Eduard Herlt where classified solutions are given. Table of contents: http://assets.cambridge.org/97805214/61368/toc/9780521461368_toc.pdf



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