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If you want a more palatable assumption than a population of alpha particles dwelling inside each heavy nucleus waiting to escape, imagine this instead: Inside the nucleus that you have many protons and neutrons rattling about, and that pairing interactions cause alpha particles to form and disintegrate with some frequency which doesn't depend (much) on the ...


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I am recent graduated physicist. Assuming that you are looking for rigorous learning instead of just popular science, I would like to recommend a few books to get started in this amazing field of knowledge. Before you learn some hard Calculus, you can read this books: Physics for Scientist and Engineers. Tipler & Mosca. This books are the easiest ...


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I would highly recommend the two seminal papers by E. T. Jaynes, http://journals.aps.org/pr/abstract/10.1103/PhysRev.106.620 and, http://journals.aps.org/pr/abstract/10.1103/PhysRev.108.171 Also check out the book by E. T. Jaynes, which has a focus on the foundations in probability but is rather light on applications in physics: ...


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This could be probably the closest one that I know: Data Analysis in High Energy Physics: A Practical Guide to Statistical Methods Olaf Behnke (Editor), Kevin Kroninger (Editor), Gregory Schott (Editor), Thomas Schorner-Sadenius (Editor) ISBN: 978-3-527-41058-3 http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-3527410589.html Especially Chapter 11 is ...


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As others have stated, it really depends on why you want to learn quantum mechanics, and how deeply you want to learn it. (1) If you want to learn it as badly as you want to watch a movie at the movie theaters (i.e. not that badly - you're just mildly interested), then I'd recommend, aside from the books already mentioned, Mr. Tompkins in Paperback by ...


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For the theoretical background with an occasional nod to experiments, my bible is "Optical Coherence and Quantum Optics" by Mandel and Wolf. This book is both a text book and a reference for researchers. It covers the basics of random signals, quantum mechanics, the quantum theory of radiation, quantum optics, a bit of nonlinear optics, a bit of laser ...



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