Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

If you are interested in physical applications you could also include: Bratteli-Robinson: Operator algebras and quantum statistical mechanics It is a two-volume quite complete book, mathematically minded, discussing lots of applications of operator algebras theory to several physical systems, especially arising from statistical mechanics. Haag: Local ...


3

You might consider having your research mentor co-write a paper with you and submit it to a journal of pedagogy such as The Physics Teacher. Or, if your result is novel enough, any peer-reviewed research journal that includes in its scope the type of science you have worked on in the lab. Your mentor should have some idea of whether this is appropriate or ...


3

First let me refer you to Eric Weinberg's book where the instanton moduli space is described in more detail. Principal bundles over 4-dimensional Riemannian manifolds are classified by the second Chern class = Instanton number and the t' Hooft discrete Abelian magnetic fluxes. Please see the following Lecture notes by Måns Henningson. t' Hooft fluxes ...


2

Higher maths for beginners is ana amzing little book on all the subjects you mentioned, written by one of the fathers of Soviet nuclear bomb, and theoretical phsyicists. On math physics, the best introductory test is Elements of applied math physics, it has dufferential equations and complex analysis and other cool topics. Unfortunately, it may not have ...


2

A very good introduction is "Introduction to Elementary Particles" by David Griffiths. Then, if you really want to get into the nitty gritty, jump to a text on quantum field theory, such as: "Quantum Field Theory" by Franz Mandl and Graham Shaw "Quantum Field Theory in a Nutshell" by A. Zee, specially if you have any background in the path integral ...


1

Kyle Kanos mentioned Geometric Algebra for Physicists. While geometric algebra is somewhat different in notation from differential forms, the basic concepts are all there, and in many ways, geometric algebra avoids some cumbersome things that differential forms does (I'm thinking of Hodge duality in particular). I think the notation is easier to relate to ...


1

There aren't really many books on quantum cryptography. The only one I am aware of is a book titled Applied Quantum Cryptography. The Nielsen and Chuang book has a few pages dedicated to quantum cryptography in chapter 12.6. However, I would recommend the following review papers on quantum cryptography as opposed to textbooks: Gisin et. al (2001) ...


1

I found chapters in books on regge theory as: (P. D. B. Collins) An Introduction to Regge Theory. (Geoffrey F. Chew) S-Matrix Theory of Strong Interactions. (S. C. Frautschi) Regge Poles and S-Matrix Theory. (V. N. Gribov) The Theory of Complex Angular Momenta.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible