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I am recent graduated physicist. Assuming that you are looking for rigorous learning instead of just popular science, I would like to recommend a few books to get started in this amazing field of knowledge. Before you learn some hard Calculus, you can read this books: Physics for Scientist and Engineers. Tipler & Mosca. This books are the easiest ...


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I would highly recommend the two seminal papers by E. T. Jaynes, http://journals.aps.org/pr/abstract/10.1103/PhysRev.106.620 and, http://journals.aps.org/pr/abstract/10.1103/PhysRev.108.171 Also check out the book by E. T. Jaynes, which has a focus on the foundations in probability but is rather light on applications in physics: ...


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This could be probably the closest one that I know: Data Analysis in High Energy Physics: A Practical Guide to Statistical Methods Olaf Behnke (Editor), Kevin Kroninger (Editor), Gregory Schott (Editor), Thomas Schorner-Sadenius (Editor) ISBN: 978-3-527-41058-3 http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-3527410589.html Especially Chapter 11 is ...


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An excellent and clear review of String Field Theory may be found in the paper "Analytical Solutions of Open String Field Theory" by Ehud Fuchs and Michael Kroyter: hep-th/0807.4722. It discusses the CFT and the Oscillator Formalism for covariant string field theory and presents the Schnabl solutions. There is also a detailed discussion of the Sen ...


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For the theoretical background with an occasional nod to experiments, my bible is "Optical Coherence and Quantum Optics" by Mandel and Wolf. This book is both a text book and a reference for researchers. It covers the basics of random signals, quantum mechanics, the quantum theory of radiation, quantum optics, a bit of nonlinear optics, a bit of laser ...



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