Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

5

The best reference I know of is in the book The Kerr Spacetime, edited by Matt Visser. David Wiltshire and Susan Scott. The introduction by Matt Visser contains a lot of additional info on the original paper, and the subsequent chapter by Kerr contains a detailed account of everything that motivated him to look for the metric and the steps that don't ...


3

The original reference is Kerr, R.P. Gravitational field of a spinning mass as an example of algebraically special metrics. Phys. Rev. Lett. 11, 237.


2

An Illustrated Guide to Relativity - Tatsu Takeuchi A very enjoyable book on special relativity for beginners. It covers the basics (Lorentz transforms, length contraction, time dilation, velocity addition, twin paradox,...) using spacetime diagrams rather than equations. It's a fun and intuitive introduction. To give you an idea: this is an illustration ...


2

The Landau series is less modern than many of the Griener books from the series, however its much more concise and of very high quality. If you are comfortable with the maths and just need some physics insight, Landau is a fantastic choice. If you want some more modern approaches with more thought put into application and examples, then the Greiner books ...


2

The American Journal of Physics has in its archives a couple hundred "Resource Letters," which are mini-reviews of some interesting topic with several hundred references each. The recent resource letters usually group the references by their complexity, making it easy to find "simple" or "thorough" treatments of a topic. The journal is published by the ...


1

you can also read this paper , it is very useful A Possible Intuitive Derivation of the Kerr Metric in Orthogonal Form Based On Ellipsoidal Metric Ansatz.


1

A rather recent book is An Introduction to Tensors and Group Theory for Physicists. It also speaks of vectors and tensors at a good level. In my opinion it clears up the confusion physicists tend to make when speaking of these topics. Moreover the book is disseminated with examples and applications from mechanics, EM and QM, so is a great introduction to ...


1

I am not sure what the exact system is from the description. However, if you are considering the Hamiltonian of the form $\mathcal{H} \sim J_{ex}\sum \sigma_i \sigma_j$ or something similar, then the corresponding partition function will be $Z \sim \sum e^{-\frac{J_{ex}}{k_B T}\sum \sigma_i \sigma_j}$. It is pretty clear that the physics only depends on the ...


1

You have to realize that wave equations and interference phenomena had been studied and understood by the nineteenth century. Plane waves are the simplest mathematical solution of wave equations, where k, is the wave’s wave number or more specifically the angular wave number and equals 2π/λ, where λ is the wavelength of the wave. k, has the units of ...


1

I would recommend the book Introduction to Conformal Field theory by Blumenhagen and Plauschinn. It is quite sort and can serve as a perfect introduction to CFT. It covers the basics of CFT in the first 3 chapters and then in the remaining 3 it goes on to introduce the CFT concepts that will appear most frequently in String theory. I believe the content of ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible