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6

There is a new book called Physics From Symmetry which is written specifically for physicists and includes a long, very illustrative introduction to group theory. I especially liked that here concepts like representation or Lie algebra aren't only defined, but motivated and explained in terms that physicists understand. Plus no concepts are introduced which ...


3

There is a great introduction called "This is How Quantum Field Theory Works" which, I think, is exactly what you are looking for. All essential concepts are introduced and the basic idea how one gets from the fundamental equations to cross sections, i.e. quantities that can be measured in experiments is sketched.


3

Physics from Symmetry is a book that explains all group theoretical concepts needed to understand the foundations of QFT in great detail and is written specifically for physicists. It's not very technical, but it's great if you want to understand quickly what concepts are really important for modern physics and why. For example, it explains why things ...


2

My recommendations are: For Mechanics, Mathematical Methods of Classical Mechanics, by Arnold. For Electromagnetism, Modern Electrodynamics, Zangwill. For Quantum Mechanics, Quantum Physics, Le Bellac, or, at an easier level, Introduction to quantum mechanics, Griffiths. For General Relativity, General Relativity, Wald. This should give you a (good) ...


2

I would suggest one of the (standard) books (though somehow old) on QFT in curved spacetime, Quantum Fields in Curved Space (Birrel & Davies) Relates to path integral formalism, and covers a lot of topics in QFT on curved spacetime Quantum Field Theory in Curved Spacetime (Parker & Toms) Uses DeWitt notation, a lot based on effective action ...


2

As far as I understood from my so far cursory look into a living review article by Poisson, Pound and Vega on The Motion of Point Particles in Curved Spacetime, it's a bit messy. But I think if you manage to go through GR, this should be manageable, as well. It will probably help if you've dealt with Green's functions before and even better if you've seen ...


1

Introduction to Plasma Physics by Francis Chen is probably one of the best sources for introductory plasma physics, despite being slightly dated (publication date of 1995) and using CGS units. It covers, among other things, particle motions in E&M fields plasmas as fluids (e.g., MHD) plasmas as particles (kinetic theory) controlled fusion As a ...


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There are a lot of review articles and books on these topics. But most of them require some knowledge of basic General Relativity and QFT. For Black hole thermodynamics I found the reviews by Jacobson and Ross very useful. On EE from vondensed matter (QFT) point of view there are papers by Cardy and others. But for those you need CFT background. Here is a ...



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