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The answer suggesting "Art of Electronics" is spot on -- no argument. However, it is also spot on expensive. An alternative is Practical Electronics For Inventors which is now in its 4th edition and an excellent low priced book that allows you to move through the material more quickly. The scope of coverage for "Practical Electronics For Inventors" is ...


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Art of Electronics, now in its 3rd edition by Horowitz and Hill has always been a classic. Comprehensive and easy to read with an emphasis on practice rather than deep theory. I am a professional electronics engineer and I have used it (I transitioned from physics) for decades


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You can't really go past anything written by R. E. Colins on the subject of antenna theory. Robert E. Collin, "Antennas and Radiowave Propagation" This book with give you a thorough discussion in the theoretical grounding of such useful intuitive crutches such as the effective area formula, gain versus directivity formula and, above all, electromagnetic ...


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A classic on the subject is Giorgio Parisi's Statistical Field Theory. It is a complete book written by one of the most influential physicists in the field. The book starts with a brief recap on statistical mechanics and then introduces the Ising Model, were the basic techniques of statistical field theory are introduced. It then moves on to (in this ...


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This question is a little too big, entire text books have been written to answer it. A standard reference is van Kampen, Stochastic processes in physics and chemistry. Roughly speaking, for a Markov process Master equation -> Kramers-Moyal expansion -> Fokker-Planck equation where the master equation gives the microscopic probabilistic rule for ...


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Reichenbach's original volume, "Axiomatization of the Theory of Relativity", appeared in 1924. It is one of a long string of works that periodically rediscover and/or explore the issue of non-Einstein synchronization in Special Relativity. See for instance this review on "Synchronization Gauges and the Principles of Special Relativity" and refs. therein ...


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Although you might find most applications of the concept of Berry's phases in condensed matter physics, it is really present in most areas of physics as it captures the deep connection between geometry and physics. Plainly stated, this connection stems from the fact that for the really interesting problems in physics, wave functions are not functions on the ...


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As you described the book you are searching for I thought of a book that fit that description except it may not be the same book. I have a text book for a course given at Cal Berkeley by Professor Richard A. Muller. It is called "Physics and Technology for Future Presidents" with a subtitle of "An Introduction to the Essential Physics Every World Leader ...


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Since the question has not been closed, here are a few references on the subject that exist on the net. Of course a nuclear physics course is a prerequisite for serious physics studies. http://ee.stanford.edu/~hellman/sts152_02/handout02.pdf http://www.abomb1.org/nuketech/ this has many more references inside. ...


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Of course, you can do it with Matlab, Mupad, Maple, Mathematica or even the Smart Math Calculator. Use this method: First define your variables with your units of choice, then tell the programm what the conversion factors from the given units to the target units are, for example, if you have km/h and need m/sec define 1km as 1000m and 1sec as h as 60² ...


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I second Jammer's book. It is conceptually well laid out. Contrasted to this, Pais' book ("Inward Bound") tries to chronologically catalogue the events. So, it depends on what exactly you are looking for. Apart from these two, there are other books which are narrow and focused about quantum physics topics. E.g., there is Wheaton's "The Tiger and the ...



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