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Most physics publications nowadays (at least in my experience) include a link to the paper's DOI, which is the easiest way to get to the reference's abstract page. If I am reading a printed-out paper and care about the references, I'll usually have the references section in a browser window and use that to go to each reference. Absent that, the best bet is ...


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The line J. Stat. Phys. 148 513-547 contains all the information needed to locate the article. It appeared in the Journal for Statistical Physics, issue 148 on pages 513-517. In fact, if you just type the stuff in my quote into Google, the third hit (at least on my search) is a .pdf version of the paper.


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If you are interested in molecules then The nist webbook has a huge store of information ---- see http://webbook.nist.gov (NB no pay wall) You can search pretty easily and get mass spectra, heats of formation and some information about IR and UV/Vis spectra as well To quote from their front page there are.... Thermochemical data for over 7000 ...


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I like Bill Gibbs' book Computation In Modern Physics for a couple of reasons (aside from having taken the course from the author): After introducing basic tools (difference approximations to differential equations, numeric quadratures (i.e. integrals), and eigenvalue problems in a matrix form) it moves right on to problems of interest to me. The examples ...


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Physics papers and books from 18th and 19th century by Kelvin, Rayleigh and J.J. Thomson and other physicists who invented lot of physics while thinking about everyday phenomena. You can find them on Internet Archive as their collected papers/works.


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I would get Wald. That's the standard text for the field. It has a small number of problems, but they're very good. I would recommend downloading homework problems from other schools, for example MIT opencourseware. It seems to be the trend that for GR the most popular textbooks are not problem-heavy. One neat book that is dedicated to problems is the ...


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The "Problem book in relativity and gravitation" is free online here -- legally, from the authors. It's got a pretty broad variety of questions, along with solutions. It is a little on the old side, but many of the problems are just as relevant today. But I don't think there's much that can compare to MTW.



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