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9

This list is extensive, but not exhaustive. I am aware that there are more standard GR books out there such as Hartle and Schutz, but I don’t think these are worth mentioning. Books with stars are, in my opinion, “must have” books. (I) denotes introductory, (IA) denotes advanced introductory, i.e. the text is self-contained but it would be very helpful to ...


5

The first thing that must be said is that the question is not really specific enough: Applications to what exactly are you looking for? To me, a book on algebraic geometry and mirror symmetry, and how it relates to mirror symmetry as physicists know it, is very relevant and interesting. However, I have the feeling that this is not exactly what you're looking ...


2

For online sources, there are some good introductions to special relativity here and here. For a print book An Illustrated Guide to Relativity seems like a good intro. Another good one is Spacetime Physics by Wheeler and Taylor, which I think for the most part just requires algebra though there may be some sections/problems that use some basic calculus. ...


2

Anthony Zee just came out with Group Theory in a Nutshell for Physicists - covers most of what a undergrad physics student needs including finite groups and representations, except Young diagrams.


1

Collected Papers of L.D. Landau edited by D. Ter Haar The Discovery of Super Fluidity These above books might help you. Start doing your own research, this is how we study.


1

I second Jammer's book. It is conceptually well laid out. Contrasted to this, Pais' book ("Inward Bound") tries to chronologically catalogue the events. So, it depends on what exactly you are looking for. Apart from these two, there are other books which are narrow and focused about quantum physics topics. E.g., there is Wheaton's "The Tiger and the ...


1

'Mathematical Physics' by Kusse and Westwig is just the thing you need. The fifth chapter is devoted to the Dirac-delta function. The book is fairly easy to understand and provides the proofs of the theorems that are stated in Arfken-Weber. After having read this, you can read the appendices I and II in Cohen-Tannoudji (Quantum Mechanics) on Fourier ...



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