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I've been looking at this Java archive General Relativity (GR) Package written by Wolfgang Christian, Mario Belloni, and Anne Cox It includes a lot of simple programs about Newtonian mechanics, special relativity and general relativity, including the aforementioned GROrbits. It doesn't permit custom metrics - you are limited to Schwarzschild ...


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There are of course many books out there, quantum statistics is a really well-established field, so regardless of suggestions here you should really look further on your own as well and find one that suits you best. But here are a few that I've used in the past that you may find useful: Statistical mechanics: A survival guide by Mike Glazer and Justin ...


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A further investigation led me to the desired reference, which discusses this precise problem: Hard Superconductivity: Theory of the Motion of Abrikosov Flux Lines Work of Anderson and Kim, at Bell Labs, around 1964


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You can read the utterly fantastic Feynman Lectures on Physics which is free for online viewing at the link provided. I would also recommend Feynman's Tips on Physics: Reflections, Advice, Insights, Practice - A Problem-Solving Supplement to the Feynman Lectures on Physics. My University uses Giancoli as well as the textbook for introductory physics, but I ...


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I'm not completely sure what you want, but honestly the entirety of Spivak's Calculus on manifolds is devoted to exactly that. If you want something that feels familiar, you can simply find $\nabla$ in various coordinate systems in Wikipedia, but if you want a less coordinate-centric view then you're probably going to need to step outside of your comfort ...


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For particle/light motion in 2D space, my nomination would be GROrbits It's free and requires a JVM to run, there is also a web start version for the brave ;) Sorry but I've never found anything aimed at visualizing metrics or curvature (apart from plotting programs of course).


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"The Feynman lectures" are an amazing gem for learning physics and are available online for free.


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Where should i start in physics? As I also mentioned as an answer to a similar question: http://physics.stackexchange.com/a/154425/4962 a great overview and understanding of physics, starting from scratch, can be achieved by studying topics in this order: Kinematics (motion) Dynamics (forces) Rotational kinematics and dynamics Collisions (momentum ...


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This is not a full answer to the question, but just to point out existing related studies. This kind of question was considered a lot in the context of Josephson junction, which is basically a superconducting ring but with a weak link (i.e. the junction), where intuitively vortices tunnel through the junction. The simplest model of such a system is just the ...


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I second The Cartoon Guide to Physics by Larry Gonick, but I also have to add Einstein for Beginners by Joseph Schwartz. Those two books are probably the most responsible for getting me into my physics career. I'd also give a big nod to Thinking Physics: Understandable Practical Reality by Lewis Carroll Epstein. This is a phenomenal choice for excellent ...


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I would say that the Wikipedia page on curvilinear coordinates and the article Mathematical Physics Lessons - Gradient, Divergence and Curl in Curvilinear Coordinates by James Foadi are enough to understand what is going on.


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This answer contains some additional resources that may be useful. Please note that answers which simply list resources but provide no details are strongly discouraged by the site's policy on resource recommendation questions. This answer is left here to contain additional links that provide little or no commentary. Staelin's Electromagnetic Waves. This is ...


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There is a book "Exact Solutions of Einstein’s Field Equations" by Hans Stephani, Dietrich Kramer, Malcolm MacCallum, Cornelius Hoenselaers and Eduard Herlt where classified solutions are given. Table of contents: http://assets.cambridge.org/97805214/61368/toc/9780521461368_toc.pdf


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I'm not familiar with "Modern Analytical Mechanics" by Pellegrini & Cooper so I can't comment on that one but I'm very familiar with the other two books you mentioned. Landau's books are generally excellent but tend to be shorter in length and sometimes very dense. Nearly every paragraph has some profound insight that you'll miss if you don't ponder ...


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The Walter Lewin Classical Mechanics lectures contain lots of good demonstrations. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUdYlQf0_sSsb2tNcA3gtgOt8LGH6tJbr



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