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When there is a resonance in electron response, both refractive index and absorption change rapidly: the refractive index has a "jiggle" in the vicinity of the resonance, like this sketch (adapted from this earlier answer by John Rennie - but I disagree with the "n=1" label so I cut it off...: As you can see there is higher refractive index at the low ...


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RIC involves magnetic fields oscillating at a high frequency. The system won't pick up any other frequency. A constant-in-time (DC) magnetic field magnetic field has no direct effect because 0 Hz is the wrong frequency, and it has no indirect effect by the superposition principle. I guess it's possible that there may be a magnetic material in the RIC ...


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Your understanding of resonance seems about right on a qualitative level. If one were to ignore losses like friction, drag, or the like, "driving" a system at its resonance frequency would indeed result in feeding it more and more energy which is stored in the form of a large amplitude of the oscillation. For a completely lossless system, the amplitude would ...


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For resonance to occur you must have (1) A 'system' capable of 'ringing'. Ringing means that the system has internal structure that can admit energy from outside the system and which allows energy to move about within the system in a periodic manner. The harmonic oscillator is an example of a linear system that is capable of ringing, but the system does not ...


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The key tool that makes resonance applicable to many general situations is the concept of Fourier series. It's mathematically much easier to analyse the motion of oscillators when the driving force is simple harmonic. You can work out how much the oscillator is driven and what the steady state amplitude is. In fact, for a oscillator with natural frequency ...


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Exactly at the frequency of a damped resonance, the field leads the response by π/2, which manifests as strong damping. Above the resonance, the field leads almost by π, which causes nearly opposite signs of the response to the field. Note we are speaking of "effective parameters", that are obtained by some choice of a homogenization procedure. Depending ...



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