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I think this has to do with sync of the oscilation of the glass molecules and the air molecules. When the planes passes over your house the air molecules approach the frequency that the glass moleculs oscilate, thus making the amplitude of oscilation bigger. That is why the glass vibrates.


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The simplest is probably a Fabry Perot interferometer and a source of light if well defined wavelength. Years ago we used sodium lamps, but a cheap green laser may be good enough. This is about as simple as it gets


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Before we go too far ... the wavelength of visible light is about half a micron. If you do succeed in setting up standing waves, and figure out how to visualize it, you won't be able to see the wave pattern themselves. The wavelength is too small. You might be able to visualize the increased intensity in the cavity, though. I've seen that in plastic ...


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It might not actually answer your question, but to throw it into the bowl: There are some advances in MRI using permanent magnets and even conventional electromagnets with static magnetic fields of about 0.5 Tesla. As far as I know one can do imaging with a reasonable resolution with these devices without the need for extensive cooling. They are used for ...


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Resonance occurs when small amounts of energy accumulate because the rate at which they are being added matches the the frequency of the system itself and the phase. The classic example is pushing a child on a swing. If you add energy, ie push, at a frequency that matches the fundamental frequency of the pendulum motion of the swing the amplitude slowly ...


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Your two proposed approaches are the ones usually followed by researchers in acoustics. There is a third one that would be an experimental approach. For example you could place a microphone inside the tube and move it to a large number of positions to construct a sound pressure map. The first approach you mentioned is comparable to a lumped elements model ...



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