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3

There are just two requirements, 1) correct frequency, and 2) sufficient amplitude. The correct frequency is, the resonant frequency of the glass cup (pane, cube, etc.). You will know you have sufficient amplitude, when the glass breaks! Both requirements will vary, depending on the material, shape, dimensions of the object, and other variables. If you ...


3

To the point of Is it hard to measure the resonant frequencies directly: it's tricky and careful discussion of the measuring procedures is needed. Some of the main problems: Destruction of the open-end behavior: If you place the speaker and microphone in front of the vocal tract to measure the response, you may have just switched open end behavior of your ...


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note: I accidentally thought OP was asking about a series $LC$, not a series $LCR$. Including the $R$ changes the results here by making the infinities turn into large finite values. Suppose you hook your series $LC$ circuit up to a voltage source with frequency dependent phasor $\tilde{V}_s(\omega)$. Intuition First let's guess what happens. At low ...


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Say your series RLC circuit is excited by a constant current source producing current $I$ at angular frequency $\omega$. Since all 4 elements (R, L, C, and source) are in series, the current through any one of them is just the source current. Then for each element, $V_n=IZ_n$. For an inductor, the impedance Z is given by $Z=i\omega{}L$. For a capacitor, ...


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Please look here you can make a function of w for both voltage across inductor and capacitor, and you can check the neighbourhood of resonant freq.


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Any structure that leads to a high Q system (the glass) will work and the trick is precisely matching the resonant (natural frequency ). By mounting the glass in a clamp that dissipates energy at a lesser rate than the sound energy that feeds it, the glass is doomed regardless of thickness or lack of imperfections. If the rate of energy input exceeds the ...


3

The resonances are quite broad: each cavity will amplify a broad range of frequencies, spanning most of or more than an octave. Driving those resonances isn't as simple as choosing a pitch. You have to do some work to efficiently couple the different cavities to your vocal apparatus, and to maintain the resonance while you're singing. The people who are ...


6

First: what frequency should you hit? There are many, many different factors at play in determining the natural frequency of an object I know from experience. These are (not limited to): Thickness, density, elasticity modulus (you'll need two of those, e.g. Young's Modulus and Poisson Ratio), and of course shape. I'm not aware of any papers publishing a ...


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There are distance measurement devices commercially available, but if none will do, then I recommend making your own using a pulsed laser, a detector, and accompanying electronics. Another method would be a small buoy with a radio transmitter and a sound generator inside. The radio transmitter sends a signal once per minute and the sound generator emits a ...


2

I had the same feeling as you when I watched the video again recently. It seemed like one of the ice giants would get ejected after coming too close to Jupiter. It turns out that there's a name for this: the jumping Jupiter scenario. Outside Wikipedia, it's described in Fassett & Minton (2013) (paywall!) and tangentially in Deienno & Nesvorny (2014). ...


2

Flutter is only possible if you have similar structural and aerodynamic frequencies. One without the other would produce much lower amplitudes. Look at a mass-spring system suspended on an eccentric tappet which sits on the edge of a small rotating wheel. When the wheel turns, it raises and lowers the top of the spring, and the mass on the bottom will ...


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When you pluck the string, you impart energy into it that's slowly radiated as sound. There are ways to radiate the energy faster, in which case the string loses energy faster. You're increasing the power and decreasing the time, so energy stays constant.


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It's the response of the system to a stimulation at zero frequency. In other words, it tells you the displacement of the system in equilibrium under a time independent force. Let me give an example. Consider a mass on a spring with friction and an external force $F_{\text{ext}}(t)$. The friction force is $$F_{\text{friction}} = -\mu \dot{x}$$ so the ...


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The standing waves you introduced are models for how air moves as it resonates. In fact, each is called a mode (of oscillation). In the continuum approximation of air being an infinitely divisible, continuous fluid, you need infinitely many of them to simultaneously model arbitrary resonating movement. In practice, you can hope to neglect all but low ...


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The wavelength is fixed by the dimensional length of the tube, but since wavelength is equal to the speed of sound divided by the wave frequency, temperature will affect the frequency because temperature determines the speed of sound.



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