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When a mass-spring system moves, kinetic energy is 'stored' as momentum in the moving mass which is then converted to potential energy in the compression of a spring and back to kinetic energy as the spring extends, moving the mass back again. This periodic conversion of energy from kinetic to potential and back again is known as 'resonance' and occurs at a ...


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I understand that a inductor builds up a charge on it, The energy stored by an inductor is proportional to the square of the current through. No electric charge builds up on an inductor. then the current flows to the capacitor, charging it. For a simple LC circuit, there is just the series current which is through (not to) both the inductor and ...


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At t=0, $i=0$ and the capacitor is charged with a given energy $$E_{capa}=\frac{1}{2}CV^2$$ where $V$ is the voltage at its terminals. Since the circuit has two elements, the inductor shares this voltage. However, $$V=L\frac{di}{dt}$$ thus the current increases. The capacitor gives its energy to the inductor : $$E_{ind}=\frac{1}{2}LI^2$$ and the voltage ...


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From here, how do I define the "resonance"? At resonance, the energy flow from the driving source is unidirectional, i.e., the system absorbs power over the entire cycle. When $\Omega = \omega_0$, we have $$\phi(t) = \frac{A}{2\beta \omega_0}\sin\omega_0 t$$ thus $$\dot \phi(t) = \frac{A}{2\beta}\cos\omega_0 t$$ The power $P$ per unit mass ...


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I think this has to do with sync of the oscilation of the glass molecules and the air molecules. When the planes passes over your house the air molecules approach the frequency that the glass moleculs oscilate, thus making the amplitude of oscilation bigger. That is why the glass vibrates.



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