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The power generated by wind turbine goes approximately like $P={1\over 2}C_p\rho A v^3$ Where $\rho$ is the density of air, $A=\pi r^2$ is the area swept by the blades, $v$ is the velocity of the wind and $C_p$ is a power conversion factor that is around 0.3-0.4 for the best wind turbine designs and will probably be on the order of 0.1 for your rotor. ...


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I think there is a problem in your question, cause "sound" is a phenomena in the meaning of process. When we talk about renewable energy, we in fact generally discuss sources (E.g. sun, not EM waves). Straightforward and basically there are two, mostly engineering problems: Sound is a mechanical wave of a very low energy compared to industrial processes ...


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Sound could be considered a renewable resource if taken from a source that was created by continual physical processes - such as the sound of waves crashing against rocks. Although those sound waves contain energy (which is the kinetic energy of moving/vibrating air particles), their energy density is very low. Therefore they are not useful for generating ...


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I think you might be a little confused. The phrases 'renewable energy' and 'un-renewable energy' are used to refer to industrial sources of energy. These industrial sources include Wind, Solar, Wave, and Nuclear power, and traditional fossil fuels (coal, oil, natural gas etc.). If a source of power is renewable, it is not depleted (used up) when utilised ...


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Yes, it "Is possible to generate energy from gravity". Gravity affects the orbit of the moon. The moon affects the level of tide waters. The movement & mass of tide waters can be captured & converted into electrical energy using energy harvesting technologies. e.g.: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jsOerwz4Z8


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As per userTLK's comments, there are two ways we harness gravitational potential energy: Hydro systems are systems where water is given gravitational potential energy by being evaporated by the sun's radiant energy. That gravitational potential energy then converts to kinetic energy - the falling of the water - which is then converted to electricity by the ...


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We don't harvest waste artificial light, because it would be ridiculously expensive to do so. The energy in sunlight is, at full sun, $1000W/m^2$. That's way higher than any artificial light in normal circumstances. So it's far more economic to position solar panels to optimise collection of daylight, rather than to capture artificial light at night. Any ...


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Most utility-scale (large-scale, the thing you've referred to as "government") generation is photovoltaic. Photovoltaics work on any scale, from watts to gigawatts. Whereas concentrating solar thermal generation needs to get a mass of fluid up to hundreds of degrees celsius, in order to drive a turbine. It's absurdly inefficient (in energy terms and ...



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