Hot answers tagged

5

Sound could be considered a renewable resource if taken from a source that was created by continual physical processes - such as the sound of waves crashing against rocks. Although those sound waves contain energy (which is the kinetic energy of moving/vibrating air particles), their energy density is very low. Therefore they are not useful for generating ...


4

I didn't read every word but I'll address what I believe are three of the most important parts of the patent. (1) One of the ideas for reducing radiative heat loss is reasonable In solar thermal systems, the hot object can lose heat by emitting IR thermal radiation, and you want to stop that process. This is a big field but the approach most people use is ...


4

I think you might be a little confused. The phrases 'renewable energy' and 'un-renewable energy' are used to refer to industrial sources of energy. These industrial sources include Wind, Solar, Wave, and Nuclear power, and traditional fossil fuels (coal, oil, natural gas etc.). If a source of power is renewable, it is not depleted (used up) when utilised ...


2

Most utility-scale (large-scale, the thing you've referred to as "government") generation is photovoltaic. Photovoltaics work on any scale, from watts to gigawatts. Whereas concentrating solar thermal generation needs to get a mass of fluid up to hundreds of degrees celsius, in order to drive a turbine. It's absurdly inefficient (in energy terms and ...


2

The power generated by wind turbine goes approximately like $P={1\over 2}C_p\rho A v^3$ Where $\rho$ is the density of air, $A=\pi r^2$ is the area swept by the blades, $v$ is the velocity of the wind and $C_p$ is a power conversion factor that is around 0.3-0.4 for the best wind turbine designs and will probably be on the order of 0.1 for your rotor. ...


1

Yes, it "Is possible to generate energy from gravity". Gravity affects the orbit of the moon. The moon affects the level of tide waters. The movement & mass of tide waters can be captured & converted into electrical energy using energy harvesting technologies. e.g.: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7jsOerwz4Z8


1

Ok, I've got some experience with both solar thermal applications and PV panels. The answer to this question cannot be simple because it involves a wide range of variables. First of all, when comparing such technologies you have to keep in mind that the potential of any solar application depends on the region where it is installed. For example, CSP (...


1

We don't harvest waste artificial light, because it would be ridiculously expensive to do so. The energy in sunlight is, at full sun, $1000W/m^2$. That's way higher than any artificial light in normal circumstances. So it's far more economic to position solar panels to optimise collection of daylight, rather than to capture artificial light at night. Any ...


1

Solar panels work with sunlight. The energy per square meter of light from the sun , depending on the geographic area etc is of order of 8 hour summer day, 40 degree latitude 600 Watts per sq. meter In one hour a photovoltaic cell of one square meter will provide energy of 600 watthours Take a light bulb of 100 Watthour . To gather all that ...


1

I'm going to just ignore all the details of your the mechanics you suggest/propose in your description and just focus on your main question in the title - because 'how' you might do it is better addressed in an engineering forum. And from a pure physical perspective the answer is - it depends. It really depends on how much energy you have available from ...


1

Magnetic fields only deflect ions and only if the ions are moving through the magnetic field. You'd need something different or more complex to attract ions. Also your "resultant positively charged collecting mass" would repel the positive ions you are trying to collect.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible