Hot answers tagged

5

The translucent sheets and optical fibers are being lit from below. Light enters one end with a relative small angle incidence. Once inside the sheet/fiber the light experiences total internal reflections multiple times because it hits the sides of the sheet/fiber with a large angle incidence. It's not until the light gets to the far end of the sheet/...


2

Your assertion If something was not reflecting photons in any direction, you could then see through it. is not right; you haven't thought of the possibility where the light is absorbed and not re-emitted. An object that absorbs all incident light is not seethrough, but black. It would block one's view of objects behind it, and therefore be very ...


1

Yes. It's is not so much the water is the beach sand reflecting light back to you like a parabolic mirror. The droplets of water on your skin can form more surface area to catch light creating a magnifying effect focusing light on your skin as well. The random texture in the beach sand will also give you even tan. Most sand is white in color even if not the ...


1

Let's first of all negelect the differences in absorption between the miror and the red brick wall. The main difference between the brick wall and a mirror is the flatness of the surface. The morphology of the surface will determine whether you will observe specular or diffuse reflection. I've depicted both situations in the figure below. You can easily ...


1

Light from the focus, when reflected to a parabolic mirror, will all be reflected in parallel rays.


1

Total Internal Reflection is an example of reflection. In TIR and other forms of reflection (e.g. reflection off of a mirror or other barrier) the angle of incidence will be equal to the angle or reflection. You wrote "TIR reflects with the angle of incidence=angle of refraction." I'm not sure if this is a typo or if this is what you intended but "...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible