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That's precisely why a single sharp image is formed. Extend all three reflected rays back below the surface to see where the light seems to come from. If your drawing is precise enough, you'll find that they intersect at a single point, which is precisely the mirror image of the object. The point of specular reflection is that the light seems to come from ...


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Total Internal Reflection is an example of reflection. In TIR and other forms of reflection (e.g. reflection off of a mirror or other barrier) the angle of incidence will be equal to the angle or reflection. You wrote "TIR reflects with the angle of incidence=angle of refraction." I'm not sure if this is a typo or if this is what you intended but ...


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I work with mirrors that reflect 99% of the laser wavelength; even higher rates are common for the mirrors used inside the laser cavity, though some method must be provided for the laser beam/pulse to escape, for example, by having the exit mirror at 90%. The relative reflectivity of the cavity mirrors determines the average number of round trips for the ...


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When light goes from one medium to another some is reflected. You get a virtual upright image formed by reflection off the near surface of the glass and an inverted real image formed by reflection off the back surface.


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Perhaps your first question is answered with the following diagram where the displacement of the incident (red) plus the displacement of the reflected (red) must equal the displacement of the transmitted (black)? For your second question the answer is that the vertical acceleration of the rope which is proportional to the vertical component of the tension ...


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The refraction angle will be different for different materials provided these materials have a different index of refraction. Reversely, by measuring the angle you can determine the index of refraction of the material. You can look up Snell's law.


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Let us dive into the light clock thought experiment, Special relativity is based on two postulates, There is no such thing as absolute motion. Phrased another way, all laws of physics should be invariant under changes in inertial frame. The speed of light is measured to be the same value in all inertial reference frames. Let's say you are on the train ...



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