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Your equation: $$ \begin{align} ^{198} Au + 198e^- \rightarrow ^{198} Hg + 198e^- + e^- + \bar{v_e} \end{align} $$ is incorrect because the number of electrons in the atom is equal to the atomic number not the atomic weight. The atomic number of gold is 79 and the atomic number of mercury is 80, so the equation in the masses of the atoms should be: $$ ...


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Carbon 14 has a mass of 14, not 12.


4

When they show a decay with a certian amount of energy, this energy is net of the masses of the particles. So you get Co = $\beta$ + Ni + 0.31 MeV, the energy is attached to the ejected beta particle.


0

by definition, any object is stationary relative to itself, regardless of any other frame. from the perspective of that object, no dilation exists, and time is experienced at it's full normal rate rather than a fractional amount as relative to another objects perspective. the rate of time doesn't increase to infinity, but rather can decrease by a fractional ...


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I believe spontaneous means it happens on its own. You don't need any outside influence to get the isotope to decay. This term is sometimes used in contrast to stimulated. Random means one cannot know precisely when the next decay will happen, though one can predict the probability of such events occurring in some time interval. A decay process can be both ...


4

Here they say that there is no waste per se only that some parts can become contaminated and they'll refurbish them onsite. The rest will be handed over to the authorities. https://www.iter.org/mach/hotcell The Hot Cell Facility will be necessary at ITER to provide a secure environment for the processing, repair or refurbishment, testing, and ...


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That's right. I'm really out of the loop regarding nuclear fusion shielding so feel free to correct me, but the only radioactive waste will be the reactor's inner walls (because of the radiation). The only other 'waste' that a fusion reactor produces is helium.


0

You're messing up with simple time dilation. Time intervals are relative quantities. Two observers may not be agree with measured time intervals of an event. You see other moving observer's time dilated. Also, you see other observer's time dilated if she is deep in Gravity well than you are. Meaning, you find other observer's measured time interval more than ...


1

There is no absolute stationary object, an object may only be stationary with regard to an observer. If e.g. the relative velocity of an object is zero in our reference frame, we observe an object which is not moving with regard to our own reference frame. In this case Lorentz factor is 1, that means that there is no time dilation at all.


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Lorentz factor, the speed-dependent dilation function, is $$\lim_{v \rightarrow 0} \sqrt{1-v^2/c^2} = \sqrt{1-0^2/c^2} = \sqrt{1} = 1.$$ We see a considerable time dilation at v=0.



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