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I agree with John Rennie, that you should read the article about confinement, but I will still attempt to answer what you may want to explain/teach to give your students a reasonable overview. A good point to start would be the phenomenology. Don't make particle physics a black box. Show what we actually "see" in accelerator experiments! For the purposes ...


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All of our observations in particle physics have led to the so called standard model of physics. The particles in the table are characterized with several quantum numbers, spin, lepton number, baryon number, charge and a mass This states that all particles of matter are made out of a basic number of elementary particles, with very specific rules ...


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99.9% of the mass of a hadron or a meson comes from confinement in QCD. Confinement is a special feature of QCD due to its non abelian symmetry which leads to a negative beta function. It is confinement that also leads to a breaking of the chiral symmetry at about 200 MeV or the radius of a hadron (about 1 femto meter).


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Your last equation does not make sense. On the left had side you have a scalar 1, while on the right hand side there is supposed to be the unit matrix. However, it is $$ 1=\begin{pmatrix}d' & s' & b'\end{pmatrix}\begin{pmatrix}d' \\ s' \\ b'\end{pmatrix} = \begin{pmatrix}d & s & b\end{pmatrix}V_{CKM}^\dagger V_{CKM}\begin{pmatrix}d \\ s \\ ...


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It does not mediate flavor changing because the couplings in the gauge basis are of the form $ c_L Z_\mu \bar{\psi}^i_L \gamma^\mu \psi^i_L$ and $c_R Z_\mu \bar{\psi}^i_R \gamma^\mu \psi^i_R$ with $i$ flavor index and $c_{L,R}$ flavor independent by gauge invariance (that is, $c_L$ and $c_R$ are proportional to the identity in flavor space). In this basis ...


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Gluons are the bosons associated with the strong nuclear force. The particles W and Z are the bosons associated with weak nuclear force. The strong nuclear force holds quarks together to make nucleons.


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I think that the answer is that there is a flavor symmetric octet representation and a flavor antisymmetric octet representatio, while the decuplet is totally symmetric. Therefore, when you consider the spin and flavor wavefunction of a baryon for an octet baryon you have: $\chi(spin)\cdot\phi(flavor)=\frac{1}{\sqrt{2}}(\chi^{1/2}_s\cdot ...


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Correction $\Delta(1620) 1/2^-$ is actually pretty well settled. (Thanks to rob.) Original Answer Actually, the Pauli exclusion principle can explain why there are no (uuu,ddd,sss) spin-1/2 ground states. In baryons, quarks have four degree of freedom: orbital, spin, flavor, color. As you already know, the quarks' total wave functions should be ...



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