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The answer given above explains that there are some experiments that might be used to distinguish between different interpretations. However, it is a myth that experiments are the only way in which one can distinguish between theories in science. Many theories are discarded without any experimental tests of their consequences. A theory can be discarded for ...


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It is often claimed that the various interpretations of quantum mechanics are equivalent, in the sense that they yield the same predictions for the outcome of experiments. But for the 3 most popular interpretations, the Copenhagen Interpretation, the Many Worlds Interpretation and the De Broglie–Bohm theory this is only true when making certain (hidden) ...


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The key here is that, just like the infinite walls of the potential well, where the wave function is identically zero outside the well, the wave function in the Aharonov-Bohm effect vanishes in the region where $\mathbf{B} \neq 0$. Further, this impenetrable zone is excluded for all paths. No path that passes through the forbidden zone contributes to the ...


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I would like to get some help concerning the definition of information [in the context of sending information] Suppose Alice and Bob are playing a game. The communication game. The communication game goes as follows: A referee flips a coin, and tells Alice the result. (Alice and Bob apply some strategy X.) Elsewhere, Bob tells a second referee what he ...


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I had the same thought a few years before you did. As I understand it - and I'm still thinking about this one - your question is excellent - when this happens out and about, all information about what the system was is lost within the system itself when it 'collapses' due to a measurement. There is nothing in the system itself which retains information about ...


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Coherent states are classical in a precise way which hasn't been stated explicitly yet, although Rod suggests at it. Suppose you want to time-evolve the interaction between a coherent EM state and matter. This amounts to solving the Schroedinger equation for: $$ i\hbar\frac{d}{dt} |\psi \rangle= H |\psi \rangle$$ with $$\hat{H}= \hat{H}_{0A}+\sum_k\omega_k ...


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According to Jaynes, the different interpretations of probability do matter in QM. Not in terms of experimental outcomes, as the formalism gives the same predictions regardless of interpretation, but on how to interpret some "paradoxical" situations. But the interesting point made by Jaynes is that Bell , because the way he interprets probabilities, made ...


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Whether the cat is dead or alive - from the observers point of view - does depend upon observation. Whether the cat is in fact dead or alive does not depend upon observation. As something cannot be simultaneously dead and alive this thought experiment can only be a negative critique. Observation or non-observation has no bearing on the thing. So a star may ...


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The de Broglie-Bohm interpretation is a way of putting quantum mechanics in a classical-like format. It is somewhat contrived in a way. It starts with the wave function put in polar form $\psi~=~Re^{-iS/\hbar}$ and the Schrodinger equation for a particle moving in a potential $$ i\hbar\frac{\partial\psi}{\partial t}~=~-\frac{\hbar^2}{2m}\nabla^2\psi~+~V\psi $...


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The de Broglie-Bohm (dBB) interpretation really only applies to nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. It can handle spin just fine, but isn't well adapted to special relativity, quantum field theory, particle creation or destruction and so on. For example, if you have a situation that is well described by the Schrödinger equation or the Schrödinger-Pauli ...


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Yes, the many-worlds interpretation is supposed to be time symmetric. Consider this toy example with a particle than can be in either of the states $\left|1\right\rangle$ or $\left|2\right\rangle$. Additionally, we denote the no particle state as $\left|0\right\rangle$. The particle gets emitted by our source $S$ that can be in its ground state $\left|S_0\...



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