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You claim that there seem to be quantum jumps and ask why this does not refute non-collapse theories. To answer the question of whether there is evidence that rules out no-collapse theories, you first have to work out what would happen is no collapse took place. So suppose that you have an atom $a$ in an excited state $|e\rangle_a$ that has some half life ...


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The no collapse people would say that if you write down the continuous evolution equations for the actual experimental setup in question that it predicts a perfectly continuous evolution of the wave vector into two parts that don't overlap. For instance a Stern-Gerlach device takes an incoming beam with a spin state and that beam branches into two. So the ...


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A quantum system is described by a suitable $*$-algebra of observables. The quantum states are functionals of the observables, that when applied on observables yield the average value of it in the state. So, given an observable $A$, and a state $\omega$, $$\omega(A)$$ is the evaluation of $A$, i.e. its average value on the state. Now the state (or ...


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Having worked with elementary particles all my working life I can assure you that particles have a trajectory. Here is proof Another proof is the existence of accelerators which create the beams that we can scatter against targets, as in picture, or against each other and study the results statistically. That is how the standard model of particle ...


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Most people would say that $|\Psi(a)|^2$ is the probability density that the particle would be found in some small neighborhood of $a$. Most people would not say it is the probability that it is in that location. This is because because that same kind of thinking (that it has a probability of having a property and that a measurement merely reveals the value ...


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What [is] a measurement [...] in the MWI? A Stern-Gerlach (SG) device has an incoming beam be split by the Schrödinger equation (applied to the actual experimental setup) into two beams, one going left and one going right. This is not the the measurement, this can be undone; and you can tell whether or not has been undone. Specifically, when a series ...


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This answer may be slightly removed from your question but may help you understand some of the background discussion. Classical physics has a good partnership between its formal mathematical language and it's informal interpretive language since we have our intuition of everyday objects. In quantum mechanics we lose the intuition aspect and hence have no ...


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Decay is fairly well understood. You can model the components of the nucleus as being trapped in a well then find the rate at which the probability current leaks out. A realist QM interpretation would then say that the wave really does leak out. Of course the wave is in configuration space so it isn't a wave like an electromagnetic wave. A specific ...


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Unless you are a proponent of there being loopholes in the various test of Bell's Inequality1 then local hidden variable are ruled out as the way any quantum mechanics works. 1 Which some non-crank people are, though as I understand it the wiggle room is getting pretty constrained.


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In CHSH we can explain why quantum violate the inequality but it tells nothing about nonlocality : The operator S=AB-AB'+A'B'+A'B The measurement process in Copenhagen is used : the wavefunction collapses in an eigenstate of A remeasuring A will give the same result noted a The same for A' noted result a' Then a strange thing happens for the B side the ...



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