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It's important to understand that the size of the state space in the many worlds or Everett theory is constant: it doesn't increase when the individual "worlds" or eigenstates "split up" or become macroscopically distinguishable. A consequence is that just as the "worlds" can "split up", they can also "merge", such as when the two spin eigenstates of an ...


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A simpler example than putting humans inside your equations might be more clear. Imagine a single electron with some spin. It is going to enter a Stern-Gerlach device as a beam going in the positive y direction and the Stern-Gerlach device will deflect a spin up beam entirely left. And the Stern-Gerlach device will deflect a spin down beam entirely right. ...


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The assumption behind the statement you ask about is that one's consciousness of the world corresponds to a single classical state and not a quantum superposition: that is, if you looked at schrodinger's cat, you would "see" it in either a "dead" state or an "alive" state and not a mixture of both. (You may want to look up schrodinger's cat if you don't ...


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Why doesn't Many-Worlds interpretation talk about many worlds? Because it's popscience pseudoscience that even after sixty years has no evidential support whatsoever. I'm afraid it's one of those things that has gained some acceptance because people have grown up with it, rather than for any scientific reason. I'm not really understanding the reason "It ...


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There exists no "spooky action at a distance" except in the mind of the bemused. Correlation is not causation, correlation is not causation, correlation is not causation .... I have read the article about entanglement and EPR paradox. The spin of two particles is measured when they are very far apart, and they always make opposite choices. It seems that ...


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The MWI explains the EPR experiment without invoking any non-local influences. Each observer measures one particle. The measurement affects only the particle being measured and the measurement device. Each measurement device differentiates into two versions, one for each measurement outcome. The correlations are established only after the results are ...


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Waves have a speed as well, and it satisfies the wave equation $\frac{\partial u}{\partial t} = c^2 \nabla^2$ where is $c$ is the speed of the wave. You said "The particle was agitated and turned into a wave" If you mean this context the wave-particle duality, actually if we don't agitate the particle (collapse it's wave fuction) it's wave function, ...


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This problem is an example of the wave-particle duality (which is a simplistic model of a complex quantum interaction). Everything can be considered as a wave or a particle, although the higher the energy (that is the larger the particle's mass) the smaller the wave length. So, a low energy photon (like a radio photon) has a very long wave length, while an ...


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There is simply no such thing as an electron that "goes from place to place". That electrons are little hard balls is simply an implicit assumption that we carry over from the macroscopic into the microscopic world. It's also a false assumption. The best way to think of an electron is in form of quantization and conservation laws that are valid for a ...


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When the mean number of photons is huge, the Heisenberg uncertainty becomes negligible and "disappears" (formally it looks like $\hbar\to 0$). Thus, such a coherent state becomes quite classical one.


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It might help to cite your source: I found this one here - is this what you speak of? Anyhow, actually this kind of idea has had considerable, if not mainstream attention over the years. Many people who have worked with quantum mechanics will have at least heard of the following: it's just that it doesn't make it into many QM courses (being an equivalent ...


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Answer to your question The term "quantum non-locality" refers to the fact that quantum mechanics cannot be described by a local classical hidden variable model. This is the content of Bell's theorem. In particular, locality is not violated. The statement of the theorem is that if we assume (wrongly) that quantum mechanics is described by a classical ...


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If you have a quantum state in which more than one of the possible outcomes of a particular measurement has non-zero amplitude (an unsharp state, as opposed to a sharp state in which there is only one outcome), then the MWI says that there will be multiple versions of you, and each version will see one possible outcome. In the standard (non-MWI) way of ...



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