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You can't have strong enough electric fields to tear the proton away from the nucleus but it is really a very subtle thing and the inability is just "by a little bit". The strongest electric field that may exist is given by the Schwinger limit. In $\hbar=c=1$ units, the field is $m_e^2 /q_e$. Once you reach this value, electron-positron pairs start to be ...


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Another attractive feature of this conjecture is that it is similar to another conjecture related to hadrons that is known to be true: that the spin of a hadron is equal to the sum of the spins of the quarks in the hadron (which come in discrete half integer increments), even though non-quark partons in the hadron have non-zero spins that "magically" cancel ...


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Electron bombardment of neutral atoms produces X-rays by ionizing the atoms, not by removing the outermost "valence" electrons like you do when you rub a balloon on your hair, but by removing the innermost electrons. The ionized atoms neutralize by picking up charge from the environment into their valence shells. However the hole is the inner shell is ...


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The concept of electric charge is introduced to explain experiments (originally from static electricity). It is found that only two types of charges are necessary and to distinguish them and to distinguish between they are given labels. The most convenient label is positive and negative (that has some mathematical advantages). It is pure convention that ...


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All particles seems to be grouped under two distinct polarities based on the manner of attraction or repulsion. Those particles repelling one another are said to have like charges. Those that attract one another have different charges. Being a positive or negative charge, is a matter of convention already accepted by world scientific community. A Charge is ...


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In one sense, this should not be a coincidence, because the mass and the charge radius are actually determined by more fundamental quantities (quark masses, strong force coupling constant). So given that those quantities have their particular values, in theory it inexorably determines what "mass times charge radius" is going to be. What should be a ...



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