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Your question asks why the "current quark masses" [see http://pdg.lbl.gov/2011/download/rpp-2010-booklet.pdf at page 21] of the quarks that make up a proton don't add up to the mass of the proton. The problem is that, for the light quarks, the "current quark masses" are very different from the "constituent quark masses" [see wikipedia]. "Constituent quark ...


2

The equivalence principle tells us that energy and mass are really just two sides of the same coin, and are related by $E = m c^2$. Rearranging, we get that $m = E/c^2$, so instead of asking where all that mass comes from, let's ask where all that energy comes from. In the case of the proton, there are some quarks and gluons that make it up, and those ...


1

The three quarks you talk about are usually called the valence quarks of the proton, and their contribution to the mass of the proton is not it. In particle accelerators, when we hit protons with high energy beams, we discover that protons are made of a cluster of smaller constituents (like quarks and gluons, which constantly are created and destroyed in ...


2

Remember that the rest mass of a proton is about 940MeV. So, a proton at 0.6c is pretty darn energetic. I will leave a precise energy up to the reader. However, there are a number of experiments in the physics literature of smashing protons into various things. At low (1MeV-ish) energies, you are looking mainly at classic Rutherford scattering cross ...


5

An atomic species defined by its number of protons (usually denoted $Z$) and its number of neutrons (usually denoted $N$) is called a nuclide. For atomic species the number of electrons is the same as the number of protons (i.e. $Z$). You are right to assume that the nuclide of a single nuclide solid will typically determine its melting point and hardness ...


2

It's not even that simple, as different crystal structures of a given molecule can have different melting points, e.g. Ice-V . I don't remember enough solid-state physics to state whether any elements form different crystal structures with different melting points, but certainly, for example, the hardness of carbon depends on whether it's diamond or ...


3

Atoms and molecules that have high boiling points and melting points have strong intermolecular bonds that resist form change. Therefore, to make a material win these properties, in general your you want long chained molecules.


1

A proton is described as a combination of three valence quarks, each with a bayrion number of 1/3 and a charge that adds up to the +1 of the proton, two up and one down. That is a primary constraint from data. Now in QCD, the theory we have developed to describe the strong interactions of quarks, it comes about that overall, in the constraining "bag" ...


1

I'm a little new here, so I can't comment yet. However, I do think you're supposed to indicate what you've already tried, so please try to give this problem you're best shot before looking to my answer below and next time, give some indication that you've put some effort into the problem. ...


0

You can look at data from the ACE and Wind spacecraft at NASA's SPDF CDAWeb. Both of these spacecraft have solid state telescopes that go up to tens to thousands of keV for protons. The data is freely available to anyone.


1

The observable effects of the gluon field are in the nuclear binding energy curve. The spill over gluon field is what gives the strong nuclear force the attraction that binds protons and neutrons into nuclei. We use this in our every day life through the electricity provided by fission reactions, and shall be using it in the future through fusion reactors. ...



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