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No, they don't. Only some of negative particles (electrons) on the top shell could do that. Atomic nuclei together with inner electronic shells do not move (almost). In metals they form kind of crystalline cubic grid.


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Think of charges as a bunch of $+1$s (protons) and $-1$s (electrons). It doesn't matter how many $0$s (uncharged particles) we have because $0 + 0 + 0 + 0 +... +0 = 0$. Now in most cases it's pretty difficult to change the number of $+1$s a body has, so we can see if it has more $-1$s than $+1$s to know if it's negatively charged or not. Let's call the ...


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Although there is already an accepted answer, I want to give some further ideas: While the Bragg-peak is the "perfect" solution to get a high percentage of effective dose to the desired tissue, the exact positioning of this peak in the tumor tissue can be challenging due to misalignments of CT/MRI data and the application gantry and furthermore due to ...


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proton collisions from a cern blog (LHC) Anything is possible provided the conservation of energy holds. the collision results in a shower of all types of particles,.. in a proton-proton collision “anything” can happen, provided some important principles are respected, such as energy and momentum conservation. How many quarks? The graphic ...


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Some practical information first - the charged particle beam passing through the matter suffers from energy (and also angular) straggling. That means that even if an ideally monoenergetic beam is used, there will be always a finite volume with Bragg peak losses. The bigger initial energy, the bigger is the volume. Protons stopping at 40 mm have straggling ...



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