Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

The energy is defined as $$ E = \frac{p^2}{2m} + V(\vec r) $$ where the first term is the kinetic energy and the second term is the potential energy calibrated so that $V(\vec r)=0$ for $|\vec r|\to\infty$. Consequently, you may say that the energy in a given state (an analogy of an orbit in classical physics) is equal to the kinetic energy $T_\infty$ ...


3

For example, the escape velocity of a particle from the galaxy is about 400 km/s and in most conceivable circumstances (unless you are basically on top of the event horizon of a black hole or on the surface of a neutron star), escape velocities will be far, far below relativistic speeds (here defined as $3\times10^4$ km/s). So basically, if a particle has a ...


1

I am puzzled at your leap: quantum bound state of electron to hydrogen, to the earth potential classical bound state. Bound classically and bound quantum mechanically are two different frameworks. The electron is bound quantum mechanically to the hydrogen atom and does not "see" the gravitational coupling quantum mechanically due to the very small value of ...


1

Technically, the energy of a system is conserved. This is a subtle, but important, distinction from the energy being constant. Conservation is different from constancy in that energy can move in and out of a system and can change forms, but it is neither created nor destroyed. An expanded formula would look like this: ...


1

I propose redefining this problem as follows (because I'm not sure it has a solution the way the OP has defined it). Let $y=f(x)$ be some symmetrical (around $y$) function like $x^2$. Let the point mass experience a friction force acc. to the usual simple model $F_f=\mu F_N$, with $F_N$ the Normal force acting on the point mass in the point $(x,y)$ ($N$ ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible