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1

You should take it completely literally. (Quibbles about the Higgs field vs the Higgs boson are misguided. Particles don't acquire masses until the point at which the Higgs boson appears, so attributing the particle masses to the Higgs boson is just as correct.) However, there is a simple way to picture this. The concept of a Higgs boson is completely ...


4

It is probably impossible to illuminate most targets in time for a heavy freight train to stop. The lights are more to warn people on/near the tracks that the train is coming. On most high speed trains (European/Japanese not American defn) driver can't even see signals in time and so has to rely on electronic readouts in the cab. Given that a major design ...


9

"Binding a massless particle into a small space" is a good phrase for a popular discussion, but it is not the only way to picture the Higgs mechanism. Another perspective comes from the fact that every particle inside some interaction field behaves exactly like its energy or momentum has changed. This concept is called canonical momentum, in contrast to the ...


3

A standard simple answer (for the standard Higgs boson field) is that a particle acquires mass by passing through this field, which changes the particle's inertia (thus appearing as acquiring mass which is a measure of inertia among others) Of course the standard Higgs boson is still investigated (if it is the standard one and not some variation of other ...


15

Short answer: do not take it literally, without further context. In order to understand the Higgs boson's role in the Standard model, it is necessary to take a closer look at the framework in which we describe elementary particles: quantum field theory. In this approach, particles are described as excitations of fields that spans all spacetime. The ground ...


96

The Higgs field (note it is the field that is important here, not the Higgs boson itself, which is just a ripple in the Higgs field) gives particles mass in the same sense that the strong force gives the proton mass (context: $99\%$ of the mass of the proton comes not from the mass of its constituent quarks, but from the fact that roughly speaking the quarks ...


0

Fluctuations in the mean are also called fluctuations. It gives a notion about how reliable the mean value is (the second moment of the distribution). Any quantity that we are uncertain about will have that uncertainty encoded in a probability distribution, Quantum mechanics is no different in that respect then any other theory of inference, it is only ...


11

Warp drives are not allowed by the basic laws of physics, in particular the theory of relativity prohibits any superluminal motion or superluminal propagation of usable information. So whatever "exotic matter" or other wordings are proposed to justify the superluminal warp drives is banned, too. The typical "exotic matter" needed for warp drives would need ...



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