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3

If that happened, we would be able to detect it by looking at correlations between successive photons' "decisions." That is, suppose you represent each pair of consecutive photons (1 and 2, 2 and 3, 3 and 4, etc.) with $+1$ if they both made the same "decision" or $-1$ if one went through the polarizer and the other didn't. Take the average of these numbers ...


5

There is no such mechanism. The probability for a photon to pass through a polarizer at an angle $\theta$ is $\cos^2(\theta)$, regardless of what has happened before, and regardless of how many photons "at once" try to pass through it. As Bell's theorem tells us, the quantum world is really random (or non-local).


1

I do not think there is one method to describe where all the energy goes. This question is similar to an often researched question: "What determines the Laser Induced Damage Threshold (LIDT)". For CW lasers the answer is often (joule) heating. But for pulsed lasers, damage is often caused by dielectric breakdown (i.e. energy going into 're-arranging' a ...


1

IMHO, the current use of the word helicities happens only when one is looking at some representation of $SU(2)$. 1) Now, a first point of view is to try to go back to representations of $ \otimes^n SU(2)$, when working with representations of $SO(D-2)$. In the best case, you will have different kind of "helicities". Suppose we work with $D=6$, so spin-$1$ ...


0

If you split the circularly polarised light up into two perpendicular polarisations with a $\pi/2$ phase lag between them. You are free to choose which unit vectors to represent these perpendicular polarisations - so choose one in the plane of incidence and one parallel to it. Upon reflection at the Brewster angle the component polarised in the plane of ...


0

One possibility is that your polarizer interacts with the other parts of your setup (for example, forms a resonant cavity with some other interfaces that enhances transmission). You can test this hypothesis by rotating your polarizer (is the intensity always brighter?). If you include a drawing of your setup, it would be easier to figure out the underlying ...



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