New answers tagged

3

Scientists think that Venus' internal structure is somewhat like Earth's, as shown below: In other words, a crust, mantle, and core. We also know that Venus doesn't have plate tectonics like Earth. Venus also probably has a partially molten core, like Earth. Honestly, we don't know much else. We can tell you the atmosphere composition, but we don't know ...


2

So, scientists were surprised when they found that Mercury has a molten core. Since small planets (like Mercury) cool rapidly, the core should've frozen a while ago. In a nutshell, though, whether or not the core stays molten over time depends on the composition of the core...as this website says, Maintaining a molten core over billions of years ...


-1

Venus's Mass is roughly $.815 M_e$. So it would not be unorthodox to hypothesize that it is molten, which is supported by the volcanoes on its surface. It probably has a solid molten metal core like ours, with a smaller mantle and the solid core region, with the core being smaller in proportion to the mantle then our core to mantle ratio.


0

This goes along with ideas of terraforming planets and giant structures. I heard Susskind in a lecture talk about using quantum zeno machine with a black hole to eternally prevent hawking radiation and to insure the black hole is "eternal." I think that is about the most audacious idea I have heard, for you would have to keep it up for over $10^{70}$ or $10^{...


2

I may be wrong, but i think this may be related to orbital resonance effects. Due to orbital resonace, orbits are often destabilised and in some case stabilised as well. This inclination may have been produced over a long time, producing a more stable orbit(from the viewpoint of orbital resonance). For more info. See this https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


0

To formalize @GrahamReid's comments, Tides get their energy from the tidal forces exerted on the Earth by the Moon. Since the moon orbits around the earth much slower than the earth rotates, the moon drags water and rock around the earth in the direction opposite its rotation. In this manner angular momentum and energy is transferred from the rotation of ...


1

My advise on this question is to follow the data from the Juno spacecraft, which is now successfully in Jovian orbit. I suspect that a lot of phenomenology about Jupiter and related gas giants might be run through a paper shredder, and maybe a few will be supported. This spacecraft is tasked to address just this and related questions. I am no expert on ...


1

A superconducting current loop could perhaps do the trick. Let's consider a very simplified analysis for creating a protective magnetic field for Venus. We're going to be essentially imitating earth's magnetic field. I don't know much about the solar wind, so I'll assume the strength varies per the inverse square law. Further, I assume the magnetic field ...


1

What you need to pull an object off the surface of another, gravitationally, is for the tidal acceleration $F_{\rm tidal}$ from the "external" body at the surface of the Earth (or whatever other body) to exceed the gravitational acceleration $g$ of Earth on the surface. This comes with the caveat that if the tidal forces are too strong, they will start to ...


2

Assuming that the gravity well acts as an attracting mass whose force follows Newton's law of gravitation, your well will suck the object from Earth's surface when the force from the well is larger than the force from the earth. That is, $GM_{earth}m/R_{earth}^2<GM_{well}m/r_{well}^2$, where $r_{well}$ is the distance between object and well. Earth ...



Top 50 recent answers are included