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The liquids are either dissolved or in a colloidal form. When the liquid is boiled off, the solute or particulate matter comes together to make a solid. This is also achieved by the changing of the molecular structure. This procedure is also called denaturation. This is how liquids can be heated into solids.


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A Boltzmann distribution is system dependent--it depends on the energy eigenstates. Moreover, if the system lacks symmetry, then Vx, Vy, and Vz may have very different distributions. However, if you're talking about an ideal gas--then it's the standard Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution. To get just Vx, you can use the equal-parition property, and rewrite a 1-d ...


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I've been wondering about what makes things melt versus light on fire, or why somethings burn at some temperature rather than melt(or vice versa) maybe I started off thinking of things burning or melting on a pan. I had this same line of thought to a large extent--some things will just melt at some temperature before they burn, but other things seem as if ...


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To determine the coefficient of friction, (in an ideal situation, of course) push a known mass of the object with a given force F. Also the frictional force has a numerical value of (approximately) coeff. times normal force. So you can calculate the coeff. this way. There are momentary 'bonds' formed between the surfaces. These bonds arise due to Van der ...


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As @Tweej suggests, it's because of water solubility. Because water molecules are quite polar, most things that are charged or polar are soluble in it (i.e.~"hydrophilic"). When a coffee stain dries up, the residue sticks to the surface. But when water is applied, it will readily mix with the water, and more easily be removed. Fats and oils are ...


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It's not necessary to use QFT to predict the lowest potential energy conformations of e.g. ethane and butane. Quantum chemistry, in particular the Molecular Orbital and VSEPR models, allow chemists to determine the electron configurations of such molecules. The conformational isomer with minimum internal electrostatic repulsion, that is minimum potential ...



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