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28

X-rays do warm you up. It's just that the X-rays are more dangerous per photon (they can do major damage to cells and DNA, and are known to cause tumors and cancer), so they limit the amount of time you're exposed to the bare minimum needed for a clear image. The total energy from standing in the sunlight for several seconds is much higher than the energy ...


27

From the wiki article on color vision as an illustration of how photons are absorbed: Perception of color begins with specialized retinal cells containing pigments with different spectral sensitivities, known as cone cells. In humans, there are three types of cones sensitive to three different spectra, resulting in trichromatic color vision. Each ...


20

In addition to the answer from @MichaelS, you need to consider where the energy from each source is deposited: Sunlight energy is deposited on/in the skin where there are numerous nerve endings. An increase in skin temperature is "measured" and your brain is aware of it. X-ray energy which is absorbed by the body is mainly absorbed by bones and some ...


16

Photons can be created and destroyed freely, since they don't have charge or mass. Turn on a light, and you create many photons. Any body (made of atoms) not at absolute zero temperature will spontaneously emit photons. They are consumed just as easily. Most any bit of bulk matter will absorb a photon in the electrons on the surface, transforming the energy ...


11

In principle, yes. You can reverse any decay process and the corresponding synthesis will be valid - in this case, since $H_0\to\gamma\gamma$ happens, then $\gamma\gamma\to H_0$ will also happen, assuming the kinematics work out. However, the corresponding probability is very small. Out of all the possible things that could happen when two photons cross ...


10

Photons are elementary particles and their interactions are dictated by quantum mechanics. In quantum mechanics the strength of the interactions comes from the coupling constant that characterizes the the strength of the force between the interacting particles. To see if a particle interacts with another particle we write down Feynman diagrams (page down ...


9

Photons don't directly interact with each other, but if one photon pair produced an e+/e- then the second photon could interact with that pair. The interaction has to conserve the energy of the two photons and conserve their momentum as well of course. But yes they could (and most probably depending on their energy) just pass right "through" each other.


9

A photon is an elementary particle. As much elementary and as much particle as the electron . A single elementary particle has a fixed mass and cannot emit another particle without violating energy conservation, because its mass is fixed. In the center of mass of a massive elementary particle, electron, there is no energy for an emission , for a ...


8

While photons can in principle form a black hole, the black hole will not be massless. The mass of the black hole will be related to the energy of the photons that went into it by Einstein's famous equation $E = mc^2$. The black hole will be a regular black hole, and classically it has an infinite lifetime. Once you include Hawking radiation the black hole ...


7

If you mean actual photons, the particle gets pushed. Photons have momentum that points along their direction of travel. You may be confused because you might have heard that the electromagnetic force comes from the exchange of photons. So if charges throw photons at each other, it looks like they should only be able to repel, and never attract. The ...


6

Light from all over the place hits your eyeball fairly randomly. The lens forces light from a specific angle to hit a specific part of the retina. This HowStuffWorks article shows how the mechanics of that work. The only major differences between camera lenses and eyeball lenses is that we can dynamically alter the shape of the lens to focus on different ...


6

This is a special example of "what will happen" under given circumstances. Almost all of physics – and natural science – is about answering such questions. But they're really very many very different questions and one must be a little bit more specific about what the question is. Your general question "what forms of energy will result" is so general that it ...


5

After the hypothetical split, 2 photons with the same energy would be propagating at an angle ok with momentum conservation. Then there would be a rest frame where the angle is 180 degrees. Now if you stay in this restframe and go back in time before the split, your single photon would be at rest. However, that is not possible: According to relativity, speed ...


4

Imagine a spring-loaded trap with a hole that's sized such that only a particular size of object can enter the hole and trigger the trap. The molecules involved in vision are like that trap, with a bond having an electron energy gap tuned to the visible frequencies of light, encapsulated in a specialized protein that transforms the absorbed energy into a ...


4

A photon traveling at speed of light has a lightlike worldline. It has one place of emission and one place of absorption. The spacetime interval between both points is empty (=0), that means that no spacetime is between them. That means, if a photon would experience something, it would experience both points as simultaneous. But there is no reference frame ...


4

To someone outside it looks the same as a regular, massive black hole. Classically the lifetime is the lifetime of the universe. It might merge with another black hole. It might last forever. It might meet a singularity in a big crunch if the whole universe contracts to a singularity. If you are worried that it can't decay by Hawking radiation because an ...


4

Usually absolutely nothing. Electromagnetism is linear, which means that the result of doing something with two photons is the superposition of the results of doing something with each one individually. By that reasoning, since one photon by itself just goes on its own merry way, then two photons, even if they go near each other, just go along on their ...


3

Photons undergo angular acceleration in very strong gravitational fields, gravitational lensing.. An acceleration can be defined in its change of direction, angular acceleration in radians/second^2, so the answer is positive, yes, light can be accelerated, but its speed will still be c, only the direction relative to the gravitational source changes.


3

I'm going to interpret your question a bit liberally - you ask for the case where we ignore the Sun; I'm going to go a little bit further and ignore the entire galaxy (and in fact other nearby galaxies) and talk about the cosmic background radiation. The cosmic microwave background gets a lot of attention, but in fact there are cosmic backgrounds at a very ...


3

It's a bit of a puzzling question. I'll try to work it out, but one of the tricky parts is that atoms absorb and emit photons all the time, higher temperatures emit higher wavelengths. Photons created in the sun (per second) can be estimated, but those are fusion gamma rays. The sun burns about $564$ million tons of hydrogen per second. (Source), and 1 ...


3

To get an understanding on quantum field theory issues, you have to understand the difference between virtual particles and real particles. Virtual particles, in contrast to real particles, are a mathematical construct inspired by the Feynman diagrams used to describe interactions. These diagrams start with real particles, i.e. particles that have the mass ...


3

There's two main things to consider - energy and absorption charasteristics of different photon wavelengths. The Sun emits a lot of energy, obviously. Even at Earth's distance from the Sun, the energy concentration is still far from negligible - when this energy impacts your body and is absorbed, it mostly causes heating (a bit complicated by wavelength, ...


2

Photons are energy. When a photon hits your retina, that energy is absorbed and converted to electrical energy in your optic nerve.


2

Although there are already some excellent answers, I believe they are a little complex. Please allow me to offer a simplistic answer. Let me start with the analogy of sound waves and the ear. The sound enters the ear and causes certain cilia to vibrate in response to the frequency and amplitude of the sound wave. Similarly a photon (as a wave), enters the ...


2

They do radiate light randomly in all directions -- in the object's own reference frame. But not from the Sun's reference frame. The effect in general is called "relativistic beaming." Here's the clearest derivation that I know. Take the Pauli matrices $\sigma_i$ and adjoin the identity matrix to them as $\sigma_0 = I$. Now take a four-vector $v^\mu$, and ...


2

Photons have two degrees of freedom, the helicity. But they are not an ideal gas with equation of state $$PV = NkT,$$ so the usual derivation of the adiabatic exponent does not apply. You need to use the equation of state $$U = PV$$ which is valid for any ultra-relativistic gas. You can derive it in the same way as the ideal gas law -- by considering ...


2

I think the first answer to this question also answers your question. Hopefully that helps :) P.s. I would've put this in the comments but I'm not quite there with the rep yet!


2

This situation would lead to an accumulation of the photons inside this sphere. Quantum mechanics has no prohibitions for bosons, like photons, to occupy the same space under the same quantum numbers, so the photons would just build up continuously. But at no moment any of them should create other particles, since this would require interactions if charges ...


2

The violation of gauge invariance by this term is the "only" reason why it's never written down – as long as we define the word "only" to include all other reasons that may be shown to be "physically equivalent" to gauge symmetry. Gauge symmetry is extremely important and its violation would make a similar theory inconsistent, especially at the quantum ...


2

To answer your questions: Yes, fibreoptics transfer light. Maybe. I'll discuss that now Fibreoptics are strands of glass, they're CRAP at going around corners, I mean seriously crap, communications fibre is VERY THIN. Even then it can't go around bends well, they test it at every stage during laying. However with communications stuff the path matters ...



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