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As somebody who works in the field of chaos theory (for whatever that’s worth), I confirm Dmckee’s assessment: There is no reasonable relation to any concepts from chaos theory. There is, however, an attempt in your quote to relate this to the phenomenon of criticality – which is not chaos theory, but like chaos theory is related to the field of complex ...


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Along with all the other reasons posted, it's flat-out absurd to think that requiring double the thermal energy would somehow change the boiling point from 100 to 200 $^\circ C$ . Maybe from X to 2*x Kelvins, but even then the heat of vaporization appears to have been ignored. Edit: as thedude points out, the energy to reach boiling temperature is ...


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The book is wrong in the sense that it has made a lot of assumptions without actually accounting for all of them. So you are right that the question has incomplete information. The inaccuracies in the question are as follows: In such questions, you must refer to the principle of calorimetry. $$m_1s_1t_1=H=m_2s_2t_2$$ where $H=$heat absorbed by the body, ...


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I'd say the book is 50% wrong. For this problem, you have to assume that the specific heat is the same (or that the boiling point is the same). But either way, the problem is badly formulated. In order to solve it, you have to use the fact that this is a textbook problem and therefore must be solvable (and that's a really un-clean way of solving it). I ...


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The various solid/liquid/gas transitions are classified as first-order transitions because they involve a discontinuous change in density, which is the (inverse of the) first derivative of the free energy $G$ with respect to pressure. A phase transition is the transformation of a thermodynamic system from one phase or state of matter to another one by heat ...



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