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The usual way to "spray" things with cold nitrogen vapor is to transfer the nitrogen to a one- or two-gallon dewar with an open top, and pour liquid on them. If you want to spray them with vapor, do the same thing but stand on a ladder so that the liquid doesn't quite reach the object. The usual way to control temperatures using liquid nitrogen is cooling ...


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This problem has certainly been solved in practice in a number of applications - cryosurgery, cryogenic treatment of metals, and cryogenic cooling of x-ray crystallography samples, but the approach will depend on the application. The flow of liquid nitrogen is always always unstable and fluctuating, because it is usually impossible to prevent small amounts ...


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When you put the ice cubes in, the temperature of the cubes is (much) below freezing temperature. The drink in the glass is above freezing temperature. The interface between the ice and the liquid (the surface of the ice cube) is cooled by the ice cube, but heated by the liquid. The ice cube heats up in this process and the liquid cools down in this process ...


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I realize that this question was asked some time ago but I looked at this page when I was trying to figure this out in the context of 2D liquid crystals. Legend_Dyson gave an answer that mentioned the tensor order parameter $\mathbf{Q}$ --- let's talk about that first (and use their notation). Essentially, we are really interested in the tensor ...


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I made a very simple mistake of plotting Specific heat and not Specific heat per spin. It is specific heat per spin that scales as $L^{\alpha/\nu}$. And hence, the actual value from the data of my previous simulations is $2.44-2 = 0.44$. Using system sizes $10$ and $12$, one in fact gets a value $0.3$.



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