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In thermostatics a phase is a region of space occupied by a homogeneous material characterized by a pair of thermic and caloric equations, i.e., $T=f(V, x_1, x_2, ...) $ and $U=g(V, x_1, x_2, ...) $, resp., where $V, x_1, x_2, ...$ are the various extensive variables describing the mechanical, chemical, electrical, magnetic, etc., configuration. Different ...


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Why does a critical point even exist? I think this question is equal to this one: "Why the width of the two phase region is bigger at lower temperatures and pressures?" Specific volume of liquids mostly depends on the temperature of them in comparing with their pressure. This means, for a well-defined increment of the pressure, we can neglect its effect ...


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Attempting to answer the "why" question intuitively: In a liquid, the molecules experience significant intermolecular force - so much so, that the average energy of the molecules is insufficient to escape the attractive force of the surrounding materials. The result is that it energetically favorable for them to remain close together, even if that means ...


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I have no idea what you are asking in (1). (2) During adiabatic compression, the temperature of the system does change. Starting from the first law of thermodynamics: $$\mathrm{d}U = \mathrm{d}Q + \mathrm{d}W$$ For an adiabatic process $\mathrm{d}Q=0$. If we assume an ideal gas, then the internal energy is $\mathrm{d}U = C_V\, \mathrm{d}T$ and the work ...


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I will try to answer these questions from different views. Macroscopic view The "quantitative" rather than qualitative difference in a liquid-gas phase transition is due to the fact that the molecules arrangement does not change so much (there is no qualitative difference) but the value of the compressibility changes a lot (quantitative difference). This ...


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For a pure substance that can exist in the solid, liquid, and vapor states (i.e., wood is not in this category), let's assume that a closed container is half full of liquid and half full of vapor. As the temperature rises, the liquid expands and the liquid density falls. Also, as the temperature rises, the pressure in the container rises due to the vapor ...


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Good question. I don't have my Widom around, but I'll try to answer from memory. I think the consensus is to say a substance is at its gas state if it could be a liquid at the same temperature. This, as opposed to same pressure, same volume, etc. If the temperature is supercritical, there is no transition between liquid and gas, and the generic term "fluid"...


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There is no spontaneous symmetry breaking at the water-gas phase transition, because it's a first-order transition and symmetry breaking typically happens at second-order phase transitions. Physicists usually think of a phase as a region of parameter space that's connected by paths that don't cross any phase transitions, so a physicist would indeed say that ...



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