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Let's look theoretically to your question. Let's introduce linearized GR and then let's derive the wave equations. It is exactly the second Bianchi equation for the Weyl tensor. We want to associate some particle to the gravity wave (only for linearized gravity limit). For associating we must do at least two things: 1) Show that equation for hypothetical ...


1

If there was a quantum theory of gravity (which there isn't) then it would include a graviton as the elementary particle associated with gravity, in the same way that the photon is associated with the electromagnetic field (as CuriousMind says). An electromagnetic wave in vacuum is transverse - both the electric and magnetic fields are vectors that are at ...


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The photon couples to all particles with electric charge or magnetic moment. This includes all of the quarks, the charged leptons $e,\mu,\tau$, and their antiparticles. It also includes particles composed of quarks and charged leptons: the proton and neutron (though the neutron only magnetically), the charged mesons, etc. Many electrically neutral mesons, ...


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The entropy can be written as (discrete form)$$S=\sum_i p_ilog(p_i)$$ So you must identify what the uncertainty in your problem comes from, you would think that you have (in principle) exact deterministic equations for the evolution of these particles, so there is no uncertainty with respect to that. If you have unknown initial conditions then you could ...


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I'll make this an answer, even though it is more of a drawn out comment. As I mentioned as a comment, computing the potential energy is trivial. If you want speed, you'll probably want to look at fast methods for long-range interactions. The link takes you to state-of-the-art libraries and methods, but any introductory book on computational statistical ...


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Correct me if I am wrong, but a potential energy can only be determined for a conservative force field, which means that the force can only depend on position. So, because the charges vary with time you can not determine the potential energy. If the velocity is small compared to the oscillation, such that the displacement during the common period of the ...


1

A particle interpretation of QFT answers most intuitively what happens in particle scattering experiments and why we seem to detect particle trajectories. Moreover, it would explain most naturally why particle talk appears almost unavoidable. [My italics: the answer to your question.] http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/quantum-field-theory/#TakSto The ...



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