Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Events in high energy physics detectors that can't produce useful data, mostly because they are the result of soft scattering events, are discarded by multiple layers of trigger circuits. What these circuits do is prescribed by so called trigger menus, which are based on theoretical predictions about a large number of known and hypothetical physics event ...


0

You may be able to call them elemental particles. If you're looking for a single word, maybe even elementals.


2

You may address all of them as Sub-atomic Particles


0

Let's be clear on what we call a particle. It is an object of which you can measure its physical properties like energy, momentum, charge or spin. None of those is space and for a good reason : space (or time) is not an intrinsic property of a particle. Space is a useful mean to describe the universe and the particles in it, nobody could deny that. But as ...


2

There are no such things as particles in the physical world. The correct description of "small things" in classical mechanics is that the dynamics of the motion of the center of mass of an extended object is the only relevant physical quantity while internal degrees of freedom like rotation, vibration, magnetization, temperature etc.. can be ignored. That ...


0

Two electrons when they move experience these forces $$ F_{electrostatic repulsion } = \frac{ke^2}{r^2}$$ And, $$ F_{magnetic attraction} = \frac{μ_0 . e^2 v^2}{4 \pi . r^2}$$ As you can see from the formulae for attraction there must be a velocity. For the two forces to be the same the speed of the electrons must as fast as light, practically these two ...


0

you can check the discussion here. There is a certain case in which a phonon mediates attraction between two electrons. Indeed, acoustic phonons correspond to a slowly varying in-space displacement of atoms which produces a charge. This charge, in turn, results in an electric potential for the electrons. This means that the electron distorts the crystal ...


0

In certain scenarios there can be a magnetic attraction, but the electrostatic replusion will greatly overpower it.


0

Do you mean that the field is created by a stationary charge $C$, and $r$ is the distance from your particle to it? Even then, if you want acceleration you have to multiply your expression by $q/m$, where $q$, $m$ are the mass and the charge of your particle, respectively. More generally $a=\frac{q}{m}\,E$, where $E$ is the electric field strength. See ...


2

You are correct, it is redundant. You could also say they have the same spin and parity.


1

I suspect you have misunderstood what is meant by the term field in relation to the Higgs boson. You say: an electron creates a radial electric field but in no way it can interact with the field it created and you are quite correct that the electron creates an electrostatic field around it. However in this context the term field refers to a quantum ...


1

Take an Abelian example. The $U(1)$ gauge invariant kinetic term of the photon is given by $$\mathscr{L}=-\frac{1}{4}F_{\mu \nu}F^{\mu \nu}$$ Where $$F_{\mu \nu} = \partial_{\mu}A_{\nu}-\partial_{\nu}A_{\mu}.$$ That is $\mathscr{L}$ is invariant under the transformation: $A_{\mu}(x) \rightarrow A_{\mu}(x)-\partial_{\mu} \eta(x)$ for any $\eta$ and $x$. If ...


0

Mass comes from things other than the Higgs field--the latter is just the main contributor. What gives the Higgs boson its mass is still up for debate--for a more detailed discussion, see the following post: How does the Higgs Boson gain mass itself?



Top 50 recent answers are included