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6

Life is not so simple, as in all high energy interactions there is a probability of a large number of particles appearing at the main interaction which will subsequently have decays through the weak or electromagnetic interaction. If one sees jets of hadrons in the detectors the strong interaction is involved, but the main vertex may be electromagnetic, ...


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Because no rational process can make them. I've been over the tables, and there are only a couple of possible reactions to get there for any nuclei, and they require two rare ones. Alpha particle capture just isn't going to cut it. Look at the curve; you need more neutrons. We remember that all elements heavier than iron have primary sources as neutron star ...


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An explicit mass term violates Gauge invariance, because left and right particles belong to different representations 2.At one loop, the lepton mass is given by $m_{1L} = M_{bare} + \Delta M_{1L}(\mu = m_{1L})$ this condition uniquely defines the bare mass. The correction $\Delta M(\mu)$ is anyway proportional to some power of the yukawa, thus is very ...


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First of all, physical descriptions usually cannot be proven in a mathematically sense. Of course they should make sense and therefore mathematically sound. In particular when it comes to particle and antiparticles which is a concept of relativistic quantum field theory (QFT), actually a wavefunction as it exists in quantum mechanics no longer makes sense. ...


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Producing ultra-heavy elements in nature is not easy. So their absence "in nature" does not mean they cannot exist or cannot be created given the right conditions. Some details: The valley of stability becomes increasingly n-rich, so neutron capture reactions are essential. To get beyond lead requires rapid neutron capture in the r-process. The ...



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