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6

The mass of a particle depends on the strength of the Yukawa coupling between the Higgs field and the quantum field for that particle. In the Standard Model the Yukawa couplings are free parameters i.e. their values have to be put in by hand to match the observed particle masses. You ask why the electron interacts with the Higgs less than the top quark, and ...


4

velocities don't add up like A + B = C. This is only approximately true in the limit of every day perception. You have to consider your coordinate frames relative to each other if you approach relativistic (meaning a fraction of the speed of light) velocities. $s = \frac{u + v}{1 + \frac{u v}{c^2}}$ would be the added velocity s of two objects moving ...


4

You understand that $\mathcal C$ violation is required, as if it weren't, processes related by $\mathcal C$ that violated baryon number conservation would balance, i.e. $$ P \to Q B \qquad \mathcal C:\qquad \overline P \to \overline Q \, \overline B $$ would result in no net baryon number violation. In these expressions, $B$ is a fermion carrying baryon ...


4

There are lots of ways to make antimatter "naturally". One of the most common is pair production. A high energy photon is converted into a particle / anti-particle pair. For example, a photon with energy greater than about 1 MeV ($E > 2 \, m_\mathrm{electron}c^2$) can turn into an electron positron pair (some more considerations are needed to conserve ...


2

Actually, i would think you are rigth, too. Usually, such a Problem is described via the Bethe-Bloch Formula. If you do an alpha-particle experiment, you can even measure the attenuation of alpha-particles in air, for example. So maybe he meant something else and just put it queery?


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This could be probably the closest one that I know: Data Analysis in High Energy Physics: A Practical Guide to Statistical Methods Olaf Behnke (Editor), Kevin Kroninger (Editor), Gregory Schott (Editor), Thomas Schorner-Sadenius (Editor) ISBN: 978-3-527-41058-3 http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-3527410589.html Especially Chapter 11 is ...


1

Atoms are electrically neutral. Because of this they shouldn't attract or repel each other - but atoms do show a slight attraction, which is the reason most molecules form. This is called the residual electromagnetic interaction. In short, the positive parts of one atom attract the negative parts of the other, and vice versa. There is a good little diagram ...


1

What I assert is that instead of the line being formed because it 'follows the path of an electron or muon', it is a chain of interactions. That is, there IS a disturbance, but the path begins with an electron-atom (or even an atom-atom, doesn't matter) interaction, and instead follows like a row of billiard balls (atoms) hitting each other and revealing ...


1

Antimatter, although only in the form of positrons, is produced by many nuclides during the β⁺ decay. I can not get any reliable source, but vast majority of such β⁺ nuclides seem to be artificially prepared in a reactor, so this is perhaps not a truly natural source. Other article, named "Antimatter from bananas" states otherwise. The concentration of ...


1

Intensity in this context often refers to only the number of alpha particles incident on a unit area per unit time. If you assume that the alpha particles only slow down and none of them are stopped completely, then the number passing through any area does not change with depth and the intensity in this sense is unchanged. Naturally the intensity in terms of ...


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Trackpy is a Python package for particle tracking in 2D, 3D, and higher dimensions. http://soft-matter.github.io/trackpy/stable/ https://github.com/soft-matter/trackpy The Matlab Particle Tracking Code Repository Daniel Blair and Eric Dufresne http://site.physics.georgetown.edu/matlab/ Particle tracking using IDL John C. Crocker and Eric R. Weeks ...



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