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1

Have you heard of the "bubble chamber"? It is like a cloud chamber, but uses liquid hydrogen (usually). When you take a liquid to a temperature/pressure where bubbles could form if there is a nucleation site, you can indeed observe traces. Now whether you observed something like this in your bathroom is hard to estimate. Supersaturated liquids (like hot ...


1

Take a look at Figure 2(a) of the 1fb$^{-1}$ $B^0 \to K^*\gamma$ branching fraction measurement paper: http://arxiv.org/abs/1209.0313v1 The inclusive $B^0 \to K^\pm\pi^\mp\pi^0$ background is modelled as a black dashed line. From the looks of this plot, the background contribution from $B^0 \to K^*\pi^0$ with a missing $\gamma$ is negligible. You have ...


-1

If I understand your question correctly, the answer is no. I myself am not a particle physicist but as far as I know, in contrast to massive particles, photons cannot deposit their energy partially. Either they interact and get destroyed or they do not. Of course this way, you can make a grid and detect, where photons are coming in, however, as they can not ...


0

This choice just depends on the experiment conducted. Some plots expect the trendline to give an implied value $mc^2$, while others track $(mc^2)^2$. My personal favorites on these plots are Curie plots which purportedly show that the square of the mass of the neutrino is negative. Good luck determining what that means. :)


2

It is not an exponential, it is the result of the available phase space. The higher the mass the smaller the probability from the phase space of n particles sharing the available energy that two particles will have a large invariant mass. The background depends on the energies and experiments. One uses for the phase space Monte Carlo simulations that in ...



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