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The charge parity operator $\newcommand{\C}{\mathcal C}\C$ takes each particle to its antiparticle, which has opposite charge. As such, its eigenstates are those states that remain the same if you change all particles for their antiparticles. This can happen, for example, in a state that contains two particles which are each other's antiparticle, such as ...


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"Spin parity" isn't a thing. It's saying the xi baryon has spin $\frac{1}{2}$ and positive parity; they're separate properties whose names tend to be run together for some reason. As for why we use the word spin even though some of the angular momentum may be orbital: it allows you to imagine the $\Xi^-$ as an elementary particle which has the same amount ...


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Let's check that parity is violated by the weak interaction lagrangian: $$\mathcal{L}(x) = \bar{\psi}(x) \gamma^\mu \frac{(1-\gamma^5)}{2} \psi(x) W_\mu(x)$$ Saying that parity is violated means that the transformed lagrangian $\mathcal{L}'(x)$ is not equal to the old lagrangian resulting from new coordinates $\mathcal{L}(x')$ where $x'^0 = x^0$ and ...


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I think the source of your confusion is the misnomer "conservation of parity". Because a conserved charge is a result of the invariance of the s-matrix under a continuous symmetry (best understood in the lagrangain formulation with Noether's theorem). Parity is a discrete symmetry, and there for does not have any corresponding conserved charge (in the ...



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