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What you have not taken account of is that the light wave reflected is travelling in the opposite direction. The incoming and outgoing waves may interfere with each other, but they will not completely cancel each other out - in fact a standing wave may be formed as described below. Now - the way an antiflection coating works is to reflect the wave back ...


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In general, the interaction of matter with light is dominated by electrons because they are lighter and this makes their coupling with light stronger than that of nuclei. However, this doesn't mean that nuclei cannot interact with light: they are still electrically charged particles, and they do interact with electromagnetic radiation to some extent. On the ...


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So, the question is sort of broad but I'm bored enough. I describe my reasoning bellow. When we watch TV we are constantly looking at a screen, which I assumed to be circular with radius $L$. This is represented in this beautiful figure: Now, to make sense of what you're talking about I needed to compute some personal, yet generalizable, estimates. My ...


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OpenFilters is wrong (or your programming or interpretation of it is). Interference depends on the difference in path lengths between substrate and coating, and that increases with shallower angles of incidence. Don't use OpenFilters, use a puddle. Oil your finger, wipe off almost all the oil, and stick it into the puddle. You will create a thin layer ...


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It is unrelated to physics, but is part of a brand called psychophysics, that is, the study of perception. In the visual psychophysics branch of depth perception, you are interested in finding not only what depth information reaches your eye, but how and if all this information is used by your brain to estimate depth. Not all optic information is there to ...


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This occurs because the blue book absorbs all the red, leaving nothing to be reflected, so it appears black. White light is made up of all the different colors (wavelengths) of visible light. Some of the colors are absorbed by an object and some are reflected. We view reflected light, and we do not view absorbed light. For example, say you're wearing a red ...


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The Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle has two distinct aspects: One is the identification of matter as a wave and, in particular, the relationship between a particle's momentum $p$ and its wavelength $\lambda$ through de Broglie's relationship $p=h/\lambda$. This is the crucial bit of physical input. The second one is purely mathematical, and it's the ...


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Whatever your personal definition of "optimal", I will go ahead and assume that among other things you're aiming for is seeing as much image detail as possible - and get as immersive, or "large", an image as possible - without starting to perceive the pixels distinctly (or more precisely to perceive the mesh of thin dark lines separating the pixels, which ...


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If you look with just one eye (in order to isolate perspective from stereo vision effects), choose any Euclidean coordinate system that has your eye at the origin. The light emitted from any point on a given straight line will fall onto your retina at essentially the same position, i.e. straight lines through your eye are collapsed onto a single point. In ...


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Many ways to detect single particle radiation, charged or not. Scintillation counters can use photomultiplier tubes to detect single particles, single protons, neutrons, positrons, uncharged gamma rays etc. It depends on them having enough energy to ionize the material used for the scintillation. Plenty other ways, for instance a modified version of MRI ...



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