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4

By using orthogonal optical resonators, laboratory tests concerning verifying the isotropy of c have come a long way. As quoted from http://journals.aps.org/prd/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevD.80.105011 "An analysis of data recorded over the course of one year sets a limit on an anisotropy of the speed of light of $\Delta c/c \sim 10^{-17}.$ This constitutes the ...


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I am wondering whether is it taken as a postulate or a proven phenomenon that c is constant irrespective of observer's speed? Either one. Both. Einstein took it as a postulate in his 1905 paper on special relativity. From it, he proved various things about space and time. The frame-independence of $c$ is also experimentally supported. This is what the ...


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It is a well-substantiated observed phenomenon. Science deals only with provisional truths, but this hypothesis has undergone (and passed) immense amounts of scrupulous experimentation and mathematical formulation. In a Neo-Lorentzian interpretation, physics works differently in all reference frames except for one single, undetectable, privileged reference ...


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I prefer a variant of Anonymous Coward's answer given above, by leaving out the environment. I would say that an observer is a system that interacts with the systems it observes by entangling orthogonal states of the systems under consideration with orthogonal states of itself and possibly other systems. So, I don't bring in the baggage of an environment ...


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Unless you have zero mass, you cannot reach the exact speed of light. But lets work with the hipothesis that you are just below light speed. Two things would happens: Doppler effect: light coming towards you would get blue shifted. That means you would be unable to see a blue object coming towards you, since you would see it as UV radiation or, depending ...


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It means someone in a different frame of reference would observe events happening slowly in the other frame of reference. All observers in their own frame of reference perceive time to be flowing at the same rate. Differences only arise when observing different frames of reference. The phrasing is an oddity and peculiarity of English. It is imprecise. It ...


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A particle moving at the speed of of light does not experience time, as it has no rest frame. Furthermore, a particle cannot continuously accelerate and eventually reach the speed of light, since massless particles can only move as fast as light. They either move at the speed of light or do not exist at all.



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