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4

Quantum mechanics, wave function and all that, was not invented out of thin air and imposed on nature. It was experimental results that could not be fitted with the classical theories of the end of the 19th century that created the need for a new mathematical theory/model to explain observations. With classical mechanics we can solve the newtonian ...


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Let me first correct you on a point that you make: Wave function collapses into an eigenstate of the measurement operator. The term "classical state" is not standard terminology. Now let me try to answer your question. It seems like you're asking whether there exists a physical reality separate from our observation (measurement). The answer is that we do ...


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You are correct time does stop at $c$ speed of light, however we (planet) did not place a timer inside the light but are measuring it from outside so time for us passes normally and nothing weird happens and nothing is frozen. As a result we simply are measuring the gap of time from the 1 point to another point whilst a object (light) goes to it so as ...


1

The thing is, in relativity you cannot have a reference frame "chasing" a photon. You'll get singularities if you try to view the world from a photon's perspective. A photon cannot move like you and you cannot move like a photon. As a photon, travelling along a light-like world line, experiences no proper time it's proper velocity is simply undefined. ...


4

Light travels at the speed $c$ this speed is finite and with out using any relativity we can calculate the time it takes for something travelling at this speed to reach us: $\text{time} = \frac{\text{Distance}}{\text{speed}}$ or $ t= \frac{d}{c} = \text{8 minutes}$ in this case. For a person travelling very close to the speed of light with velocity $v$ from ...


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I'd like to add a few words to Domagoj Pand┼ża's excellent answer. He makes this statement: "....Intuition and perception (or the lack of there of) can be a big problem when you're trying to comprehend the implications of special/general relativity ...." I think Domagoj's answer is excellent, but I disagree a little with this statement. Actually almost ...


1

Sitting at infinity, you will see something more and more red-shifted - but never actually stop radiating as you would expect it from a black hole. The reason being that your coordinates (the asymptotically flat ones) diverge at the radius of the event horizon. Specifically, in your coordinates the metric of a Schwarzschild black hole (which is not entirely ...


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So, here's the deal. "Time is relative" means a lot of different things to a lot of different people. In order to make a solid step forward, Einstein and company basically needed to clarify what they were trying to say. What they were trying to say looks something like this: "if you see a train passing by you, you're going to see things happen in slightly ...


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If you think about it, time as we know it does not actually exist/flow - it is our mental manifestations of the world around us that we think of as time. For example, what we see is not actually there as we view it. The object sends us light-waves (only a small portion possibily of what the object really is), our eyes then have to decode the light waves and ...



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