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EDIT 2:There is no general procedure. It is not easy to find out how many commuting observables there are. In classical mechanics some systems are integrable. Then they have as many constants of motion as the number of degrees of freedom. For a system of N particles in d spatial dimensions times the number of degrees of freedom is Nxd. One particle and a ...


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In non-relativistic quantum mechanics the mass can, in principle, be considered an observable and thus described by a self-adjoint operator. In this sense a quantum physical system may have several different values of the mass and a value is fixed as soon as one performs a measurement of the mass observable, exactly as it happens for the momentum for ...


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Of course, mass is an observable, although in simple models it is constant. This is already the case classically. One cannot determine the path of as rocket that burns fuel (which forms a large fraction of its mass) without taking into account that the mass is variable. The same holds in quantum mechanics, whenever the mass is not fixed by the modeling ...


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Mass-squared is a Hermitian linear operator, it's a Casimir operator $\hat{C}_{1}=\hat{P}_{0}\hat{P}_{0}-\hat{P}_{i}\hat{P}_{i}$ for the Poincare group. It's Hermitian because the translation generators $\hat{P}_{\mu}$ are Hermitian. It commutes with all the generators of the Poincare group and so it's eigenvalues (mass-squared) are constant on each ...


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You have to interpret $|\frac{d}{dq} \psi\rangle$. Knowing that decomposition of the basis $|q'\rangle$ gives : $$|\psi\rangle = \int dq' \psi(q') |q'\rangle \tag{1}$$ You have : $$|\frac{d}{dq}\psi\rangle = \int dq' \frac {d\psi(q')}{dq'} |q'\rangle\tag{2}$$ So, applying it to $|\psi\rangle = |q"\rangle = \int dq' \delta(q"-q') |q'\rangle$, you get : ...


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The operator $d/dx$ isn't a "function" and Dirac surely never claims so. It's an operator, something that changes one function to another. By a function, we mean something that maps one number to another. Functions of $x$, like $f(x)$, may also be connected with operators on the space of (wave) functions. The wave function $\psi(x)$ is mapped to ...



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