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They are smoke rocket trails. Before each test blast, technicians fired these rockets up in the air, leaving large smoke trails that rose well above the bomb's mushroom. When the atomic blast's shockwave arrived, they moved the trails. Scientists at observation stations could instantly see the effect of the shockwave, hitting, moving and deforming ...


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Apologies for evincing magisterial cluelessness about what your diagrams represent and what you'd want to achieve, but I'd array the standard facts on tetraquarks avoiding Young diagrams, although they are self evident in the Dynkin labelling, which I also give, next to the tensor labelling. They may be useful to what you appear to be after--but I can't ...


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I don't know the origin of either convention, so I am reluctant to make any absolute statements, but as an experimenter the question I ask myself is "What material has I learned is present in the sample?" or perhaps "What material do I bring into the lab to observe this line?". The answer to these questions would be Berylium-7 in the former case and ...


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Well yes, maybe, but they are called planets. So fission in stars? No, but maybe in planets. I do not know what the status of this is, but the core of the Earth is heated by weak and maybe strong nuclear processes. The standard model is that weak nuclear decay. The major heat-producing isotopes within Earth are potassium-40, uranium-238, uranium-235, and ...


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Indeed, a nuclear bomb works a bit differently in a vacuum than in the atmosphere. If you want to generate momentum, an atmosphere or some material with a low boiling point (e.g. ice) is probably better than bare rocks in vacuum, because all the heat will be converted directly into gas with a high momentum, without "wasting" energy on heating and evaporating ...


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The Fox-Goodwin reference is to a method for numerical integration of ordinary differential equations, which must refer to the algorithm you were to use. Possibly the problem was taken from a paper which referenced this method; that means you can use a scientific citation index to find papers which cite Proc. of Cambridge Phil. Soc. 45 (1949) 373. You can ...


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Since the question has not been closed, here are a few references on the subject that exist on the net. Of course a nuclear physics course is a prerequisite for serious physics studies. http://ee.stanford.edu/~hellman/sts152_02/handout02.pdf http://www.abomb1.org/nuketech/ this has many more references inside. ...


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A nuclear weapon doesn't really "explode." OK, I know that there are actual explosives used in the triggering of it, but Mostly it just gets really hot really fast. Virtually all of the blast from a nuclear explosion is the result of the large volume of air that expands when it is suddenly heated by radiation from the bomb. If the bomb goes off on the ...



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