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Note that this is not a nuclear reactor, but a Fusor. Fusors work by using a voltage drop to accelerate ions to high velocities and a few may fuse. Due to inefficiencies, they cannot be used for power generation. They are relatively simple to build (they are basically beefed-up plasma globes).


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Usually nuclear rockets have lower thrust than chemical rockets, in a nuclear rocket you are trying to get the heat from the reactor into the propellant, which means a lower temperature. In a chemical rocket you have all the heat in the propellant, and try to avoid getting it anywhere else. Nuclear rockets make up for this deficiency by using a very light ...


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Let's assume that there is a "shadow shield" protecting the ship from the nuclear reactor, this means that the shielding is only in the direction of the rest of the ship (protecting the crew while saving weight). When the unshielded, uncontrollable, reactor hits the enemy ship, the radiation will kill everything on board. The reactor will not explode, ...


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Building a nuclear reactor is very large-scale investment, and as thorium reactors are unproven, and there is already a large infrastructure in place for the uranium fuel cycle (mining, purification, enrichment, rod fabrication, etc...) a uranium reactor is considered a safer investment.


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This question doesn't make much sense in terms of pure terminology. A prompt neutron is a neutron which is emitted right when the fission event happens. For a recap, a fissile nucleus absorbs a neutron and then splits into two large fragments and makes several smaller particles in the process, which usually includes 2 or 3 free neutrons and a neutrino. A ...


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The energy Eigenstates of the final nucleus (after the neutron has been captured) form a complete set. That means that any wave function can be written as a superposition of these states; in particular we can express the incoming neutrons wave function in terms of these states, $$ \psi_{in}(x,t) = \sum_{n=1}^\infty a_n(t) \psi_n(x) e^{i E_n t}.$$ Lets say ...


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This is because U-235 is fissile, that is you only have to deliver the neutron to the nucleus for the magic to happen. Unlike U-238 where just delivering it doesn't do the job, there you also have to impart the nucleus with the neutrons kinetic energy. Once we know this, it becomes clear that for low energy neutrons, their de Broglie wavelength is very big. ...



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