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2

This was actually considered under the Plowshare project The idea being to use an underground nuke to heat the surrounding rock and then run it like a geothermal resource. However, radiation problems.


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As you say, the problem is confinement (aka containment) - fusion is relatively easy; controlled, useful fusion turns out to be incredibly difficult and expensive. So the easiest way to harness it, and the only technically and economically viable way (for decades from now, and possibly a century or more into the future), is to have a large fusion reactor in ...


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a giant air tank. if the tank is large enough, we could set off a bomb inside without exceeding the containment strength of the perimeter, then harvest power from the increased pressure in the tank. i imagine making a large air-tight tank might be cost-prohibitive, although a 19 million cubic foot tank is already in use. perhaps we could build a ...


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No... In a nuclear bomb, energy does not last long enough... For continuous power, simply not enough...... But it might be possible to power a satellite launch vehicle with a nuclear bomb... But hydrogen fuel cells have an excellent efficiency which (probably) makes it a better option... All in all, I would say no... Regards, Pradyoth Shandilya


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Theoretically, yes. The problem is that there's no way to build a "small" thermonuclear warhead. Fusion isn't as simple as fission, the latter being as easy as smacking the right amount of Plutonium together. It is technically energetically favorable to fuse heavy isotopes of hydrogen into helium, but the conditions required to do so include giving the ...


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Not realistically. Ignoring other considerations, it's worth looking at how much power you would need to produce. The Sun produces about $1400$ watts per square metre at the top of the atmosphere: so let's assume we wanted to produce $1000$. Europa's radius is about $1.56\times 10^6$ metres, so we would need to generate $1000\times\pi\times (1.56\times ...


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Weapons grade $U$ has to be highly enriched to boost its levels of $U^{235}$ from the natural level (about 0.7 w%) to > 90 w%. That's because $U^{235}$ is the fissionable isotope and its concentration in the bomb core has to be sufficiently high for an explosive nuclear chain reaction to be able to occur. Weapons grade $Pu$ is not obtained by enrichment. It ...


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You already do this to some extent when your power supply is an electrolyte-based battery (a, b) --- there you have motion of both negative and positive ions in the electrolyte. Electrons are free to move in conductors when the Fermi energy falls within a band of energy levels rather than in a gap when there are no allowed energies. However, the band/gap ...


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The energy released in (mainly) neutrinos, along with light and the kinetic energy of the exploding envelope is around $10^{46}$ J. This is equivalent to 0.05 solar masses being converted into energy. This is less than a percent of the progenitor mass. The energy source is gravitational potential energy. At the heart of a supernova, there was an Earth-sized ...



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