New answers tagged

1

Indeed, a nuclear bomb works a bit differently in a vacuum than in the atmosphere. If you want to generate momentum, an atmosphere or some material with a low boiling point (e.g. ice) is probably better than bare rocks in vacuum, because all the heat will be converted directly into gas with a high momentum, without "wasting" energy on heating and evaporating ...


1

A nuclear weapon doesn't really "explode." OK, I know that there are actual explosives used in the triggering of it, but Mostly it just gets really hot really fast. Virtually all of the blast from a nuclear explosion is the result of the large volume of air that expands when it is suddenly heated by radiation from the bomb. If the bomb goes off on the ...


3

You may have things a bit mixed up. Plasma is not something that plays a role in fusion as if it were a tool or an instrument for its achievement. It is instead the only possible medium where nuclear fusion can occur: very basically, high enough temperature for protons to overcome the Coulomb repulsion, and high enough density for increased chances of ...


1

At the temperatures required for fusion reactions, matter can only exist in the plasma state. That's rather inconvenient for designers of fusion reactors, since plasma is hard to control and contain. And that's why the claims about cold-fusion were so appealing. Cold fusion promised to provide fusion power without the hassle of dealing with high temperature ...


1

Since the question has not been closed, here are a few references on the subject that exist on the net. Of course a nuclear physics course is a prerequisite for serious physics studies. http://ee.stanford.edu/~hellman/sts152_02/handout02.pdf http://www.abomb1.org/nuketech/ this has many more references inside. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included