Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

What exactly does $\Delta_{r_e}$ mean ? Your wave function isn't a field in space, it is a field on configuration space, i.e. it assigns complex numbers to a configuration. If your electron is at $(x_e,y_e,z_e)$ and your proton is at $(x_p,y_p,z_p)$ then the configuration is the point $(x_e,y_e,z_e,x_p,y_p,z_p)$ in a 6d space. A point in that 6d space ...


5

The index of the Laplacian tells you which of the coordinates it acts on, that is, if you write $r = (r_x,r_y,r_z)^T$ and $R = (R_x,R_y,R_z)^T$ as Cartesian coordinates, then \begin{align} \Delta_r & := \frac{\partial^2}{\partial {r_x}^2} + \frac{\partial^2}{\partial {r_y}^2} + \frac{\partial^2}{\partial {r_z}^2} \\ \Delta_R & := ...


3

The answer is already on page 2 of your link above: "Among the large number of radionuclides of medical interest, Sc-44 is promising for PET imaging. Either the ground-state Sc-44g or the metastable-state Sc-44m can be used for such applications, depending on the moleculeused as vector." So the metastable state Sc-44m decays to the ground state Sc-44g.


1

The left exponential evolves the $\langle \alpha_0 \lvert$ on the left. This is one of the pitfalls of Dirac notation, it would be unambiguous to write $$ (\mathrm{e}^{-\mathrm{i}E_{\alpha_0} t} \lvert \alpha_0 \rangle,B \mathrm{e}^{-\mathrm{i}E_{\alpha_0} t} \lvert \alpha_0 \rangle)$$ where $(\dot{},\dot{})$ denotes the inner product on the Hilbert space, ...


1

$\Delta_e$ is called the Laplacian operator and it is defined as $$\Delta_e \equiv \frac{\partial^2}{\partial e_x^2} + \frac{\partial^2}{\partial e_y^2}+ \frac{\partial^2}{\partial e_z^2}$$ The Laplacian operator is related to the Del operator $\nabla_e$ $$\nabla_e \equiv \frac{\partial}{\partial e_x}\hat e_x+ \frac{\partial}{\partial e_y}\hat e_y+ ...


1

There's a small error here: you say, "...these two vectors $v$ and $\mathbf{v}$" (emphasis mine). The problem there is that $v$ is not a vector. Rather, it's the magnitude of a vector; specifically, it is the magnitude of the velocity vector $\mathbf{v}$. This is actually implicit in your derivation: you created a unit vector in the direction of the motion ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible