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Consider a variant of the FitzHugh–Nagumo system: $$ \begin{align}\dot{x} &= x (a - x) (x - 1) - y \\ \dot{y} &= bx - cy \end{align}$$ with parameters like $a=-0.02; b=0.01; c=0.02$. The eigenvalues of the Jacobian at $(0,0)$ (which is a fix point) are $±\frac{\sqrt{6}}{25}i$. The attractor for this system looks like this: Obviously, this is ...


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I will restrict my answer to bipolar junction transistors. Let us take an npn transistor. Lots of electrons in the emitter, and if we forward bias the emitter-base junction they will head into the base. However, in the base they are minority carriers and are quickly gobbled up through recombination as the base attempts to keep $np = n_{i}^{2}$. None of the ...


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A possible answer for that might be that if you have a rope with the length $L$, you have a frequency $f$ as the first harmonic frequency with $T=\frac{1}{f}$ as the time between two amplitude maxima. This time is determined by the frequency how fast the wave can propagate in the rope, and is therefore bound to the speed of sound in the rope $$\nu = ...


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Generally, in linear systems modes are independent. Energy does not flow from one mode to another. What causes the coupling is a nonlinearity. The nonlinearity reveals itself at higher amplitudes (nonlinear terms are small at small amplitudes). Thus, when you drive the rod just a little bit the energy DOES go to the higher harmonics, but the coupling is weak ...



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