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Actually it is interesting to calculate the radiation frequency for an electron in low orbit about a neutron star. The orbital frequency depends only on the density of the star or planet (radius doesn't matter!). Wikipedia tells me a neutron star has a density of 10^17 times as great as earth. The frequency goes as the square root of the density. The orbital ...


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Is a neutron star's residual light released similar to an exited atom the difference is gravity hold in the electrons instead of protons? No. Atomic energies are of order of keV at most, the electrons are bound in energy levels about the atom. There will only be photons produced if an electron is kicked to a higher energy level and then decays back ...


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The zero-range nuclear interactions felt by neutrons makes free neutrons, outside a nucleus or a neutron star, an excellent implementation of an ideal gas. However a neutron gas is a little unusual since neutron gases mostly are at such low density and pressure that the neutron-neutron interaction is very unlikely to occur before the neutron either decays ...


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"Activation" in the neutron business refers to transmutation of stable isotopes to unstable isotopes by neutron capture, such as $\rm^{27}Al + n \to {}^{28}Al + \text{photons}$, or to other nucleon-exchange processes such as $\rm^{14}N + n \to {}^{14}C + p$. Sometime later the unstable isotope emits detectable beta (and possibly gamma) radioactivity. The ...


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Well essentially there is no much difference, at least if we are talking of temperature and we mean "average kinetic energy" as we generally do. Why? Because neutrons as "every-day particles" interact via the nucleon-nucleon potential which similarly to the one between molecules, it is repulsive at short distance and atractive at longer distances. Of course ...


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Neutrons interact with each other only via exchange interaction Neutrons interact via the strong and weak forces. At low energies the interaction is principally via the nuclear force, or residual strong force, which derives ultimately from the strong force interactions between quarks. This can be described as an effective force due to the exchange of ...


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These atoms would not have a negative charge, they would have zero charge. They would have no electrons at all. You could imagine (if they were far from anything else) an electron orbiting a neutron under gravity. The attraction is so weak that any other matter anywhere close would disturb it. The real question is whether a clump of neutrons could be ...



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