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The best neutron generators (~3E+11 neutrons/second) are from Phoenix Nuclear Labs in Madison, Wisconsin. They are doing (at least) deuterium fusion to make these neutrons. Their machine is based on a fusor. But the design is very different. Electric fields do work on the ions - heating them to fusion conditions. That is the physical mechanism. In a ...


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Yes it will. Annihilation is a form of interaction which only happens between a particle and its anti-particle. You can sort of imagine it even though its not completely true I think, as destructive interference of the same particle field. Its independent of charge.


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Neutron-matter interaction cross-sections vary somewhat depending on the material in question, and depends greatly on energy. In addition, the type of neutron-matter interaction that statistically dominates depends on the energy, with elastic collision being the sole contributor to material cross-sections below energies of 4 MeV: If you're talking about ...


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A very n-rich nucleus is unstable to beta decay. The neutron is more massive than the proton, there are therefore lower energy proton states available for neutrons to decay into (emitting a beta decay electron at the same time). Filling these states with protons (i.e. reducing the N/Z ratio) blocks this beta decay channel because the Pauli exclusion ...


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In a neutron star there are mostly "free" neutrons and the question then is why they don't all beta decay into electrons and protons? Well, some of them do, but the point is that when the electron (or proton, there are equal numbers of each) numbers build up then they become degenerate (meaning no more than two electrons can occupy the same energy state and ...


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Regarding neutrons in neutron stars the answer is a direct extension of the argument use by madR. In a neutron star there are mostly "free" neutrons and the question then is why they don't all beta decay into electrons and protons? Well, some of them do, but the point is that when the electron/proton (there are equal numbers of each) numbers build up then ...


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I think there are two parts to this answer. The first is to do with an ensemble of neutrons in a dense fermion gas and the second is to do with the strong nuclear force between two neutrons (in a many-body nucleon system). Neutrons in a dense gas will be degenerate. That is to say that the Pauli exclusion principle prevents more than two neutrons (spin up ...



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