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The difference is that angular momentum flux $\psi$ depends on the direction and scalar momentum flux does not, because is integrated over all directions: $\phi = \int_{4\pi} \psi d\Omega$. For the rest, they exhibit the same dependence on Energy. So $\psi$ gives the amount of neutrons that at a certain position $\bf r$ and at energy $E$ are moving in the ...


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"Free" electrons and protons can combine to form neutrons (and electron neutrinos) through weak interactions. The process would usually be energetically unfavoured in low density situations because the rest mass of the neutron is about 1.29MeV higher than the combined rest mass energies of the proton and electron. This reaction, between free protons and ...


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Yes, they can be. The production of neutrons by deep inelastic scattering of electrons on protons was studied in HERA experiments in the 90's. No neutrino needed, at least not as one of the colliding particles. Here are some links: Deep-Inelastic Electroproduction of Neutrons in the Proton Fragmentation Region Measurement of Leading Proton and Neutron ...


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In electron capture an inner atomic electron and a proton will together form a neutron and an electron neutrino, I'm not sure if that's what you're looking for however. Source: Young and Freedman Physics textbook Electron Capture Wikipedia article`


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Since a neutron decays into a proton, electron and an electron anit-neutrino you will need to get all three together at the same time. Good luck on that one!


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There experiment which has measured the most stringent limit on neutron to anti-neutron oscillations (i.e. produce neutrons, let them fly for some time and then look if you find anti-neutrons) has used a 130 micrometer thick and 110 cm diameter carbon foil. This target had a probability greater than 99% for anti-neutrons to interact (and thus produce ...


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Detectors at particle colliders are layered like onions around the collision vertex. The CMS detector at CERN First there are charged particle sensitive detectors where charged particles leave tracks because of ionisation, but mass density is low so strong interactions do not happen often; their momentum can be measured by the curvature in the ...


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Refer to: http://www.encyclopediaofmath.org/index.php/Hulthen_potential According to this it's a model of potential which behaves similar to Coulomb potential. I don't know how it's derrived, but it was derrived by a German dude. This paper compares both the Coulomb Potential and Hulthen potential: http://adsabs.harvard.edu/full/1954AuJPh...7..365M ...


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You asked HOW it is that the bonded neutron is stable, but the free neutron is not: 'What happens inside the nucleus that makes neutrons stable?' This is an ontological question and these are the hardest to answer. The best answer you can get in terms of conventional physics is differences in binding energy, as Lagerbaer explained. The Table of Nuclides ...


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Yes! Neutrons are electrically neutral, but they have a magnetic moment. You can accelerate a bar magnet with a magnetic field, so you can also accelerate a neutron with a magnetic field. For most beams, the change in energy is pretty negligible, but there's a major exception for ultra-cold neutrons (UCN), which just so happen to be my specialty. UCN have ...



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