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What is the binding energy of a neutron star? What Rob said is about right. It's about a fifth of the original mass-energy. See Wikipedia: "Its mass fraction gravitational binding energy would then be 0.187". Neutrons which constitute a neutron star have a rest mass that is greater when separated from the star because they are bound with a certain ...


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The gravitational mass of a neutron star is quite a lot less than its baryonic rest mass (plus the mass associated with the kinetic energy of its contents), because a bound neutron star, by definition, must have a total energy (the sum of its internal energy and gravitational potential energy) that is less than zero. In a “normal star” this is also true, ...


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This paper is interesting. It uses the method of calculating the number of nucleons in the neutron star, $N$, based on the radius, $r$, the number density as a function of radius, $n(r)$, and the metric function $\lambda$, which comes from the equations of general relativity: $$N=\int_0^R 4\pi r^2e^{\lambda/2}n(r)dr=\int_o^R4\pi r^2 ...


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We don't need to "observe" a star's internal structure to know if they will end as white dwarves or neutron stars. its only a question of finding the mass of their progenitor stars. I think you might be confused about the Chandrasekhar limit, which only gives you the upper mass limit of the white dwarf or the lower mass limit of the neutron star. Your ...


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In astrophysics, the mass–luminosity relation is an equation giving the relationship between a star's mass and its luminosity. The relationship is represented by the equation: $$ \frac{L}{L_{\odot}} = \left(\frac{M}{M_{\odot}}\right)^a $$ where L⊙ and M⊙ are the luminosity and mass of the Sun and 1 < a < 6.[1] The value a = 3.5 is commonly used ...



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